GLASGOW / COP26 GENDER EQUALITY

Preview Language:   Original
09-Nov-2021 00:03:49
Women took the global stage today in Glasgow to show that climate change isn’t gender neutral, and that climate action needs to invest in women and girls. UNIFEED

Available Language: Spanish
Type
Language
Format
Acquire
/
Spanish
Other Formats
Description
STORY: GLASGOW / COP26 GENDER EQUALITY
TRT: 03:49
SOURCE: UNIFEED
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: NATS

DATELINE: 09 NOVEMBER 2021, NEW YORK CITY / FILE

SHOTLIST:

1. Wide shot, plenary room
2. Various shots, “Little Amal” puppet moves to dais with climate activist Brianna Fruean
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Breanna Fruean, Climate Activist, Samoa:
“Talofa lava, my name is Brianna Fruean, and it is my absolute pleasure to stand by and stand with Little Amal today. Both of us have embarked here on a journey. We have arrived here at COP from two different places. But we are connected by the fact that we are living in a broken world that has systemically marginalized women and girls, especially women and girls from vulnerable communities. Amal brought with her today, seeds. Seeds to physically share, seeds to inspire, seeds to represent hope. The beautiful thing about seeds is that you need to be selfless enough to be content in the fact that you may not eat the fruit or bear the flowers of these seeds that you have planted, but feel that it was worth it, knowing that your children will live with its beauty.”
4. Wide shot, audience members take photos of stage guests
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Breanna Fruean, Climate Activist, Samoa:
“I hope that these seeds Amal has journeyed here with today can inspire you all and remind you the importance of your role as planters of a global future.”
6. Med shot, US Speaker Nancy Pelosi greeting attendees
7. Med shot, US delegation including Alexandria Ocasio Cortez walking to conference room
8. SOUNDBITE (English) Nancy Pelosi, Speaker, House of Representatives, United States:
“Now people ask me all the time for many years, if you ruled the world, what one thing would you do? If I ruled the world, the one thing that I would do, is invest in the education of women and girls, and their empowerment.”
9. Various shots, audience and guests on stage applaud
10. SOUNDBITE (English) Nicola Sturgeon, First Minister, Scotland:
“There is no doubt we must ensure that climate change is a feminist issue. We must make sure that the experiences of women and girls across the world, so often disproportionately impacted by climate change, are understood as we devise the solutions.”
11. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Tarcila Rivera Zea, indigenous Quechuan Activist, Peru:
“In that sense, the priority, for example when we heard that climate change and biodiversity were considered as interrelated, this perfectly allows indigenous women to be included. Because we cannot look at one aspect here, and other aspect there, but instead we have to look and the integrality of every aspect related to the lives of indigenous women.”
12. Wide shot, stage
13. SOUNDBITE (English) Samira Bawumia, Global Champion, SE4ALL:
“Inefficient cooking has an impact on education. The girl goes out fetching firewood, it is time spent instead of studying, she’s out there looking for firewood inside rural communities. So, the way we cook, the way we find energy for cooking, it all directly impacts education for girls.”
14. Med shot, Bawumia speaking with attendees at pavilion
15. SOUNDBITE (English) Samira Bawumia, Global Champion, SE4ALL:
“We are treating diseases, we are treating illnesses, but we could prevent those diseases, we could prevent indoor air pollution, by having clean cooking solutions. So, the impact on healthcare. So, there’s a lot of issues that could be resolved just in one fell swoop by dealing with clean cooking issues.”
16. Med shot, Bawumia photo op at SDG pavilion

STORYLINE:

Women took the global stage today (9 Nov) in Glasgow to show that climate change isn’t gender neutral, and that climate action needs to invest in women and girls.

Samoan climate activist Brianna Fruean introduced a powerful guest, and a powerful image, when she was accompanied by the giant puppet “Little Amal” to the COP26 stage Tuesday, acknowledging that though they may appear different, “we are connected by the fact that we are living in a broken world that has systemically marginalized women and girls, especially women and girls from vulnerable communities.”

SOUNDBITE (English) Breanna Fruean, Climate Activist, Samoa:
“Talofa lava, my name is Brianna Fruean, and it is my absolute pleasure to stand by and stand with Little Amal today. Both of us have embarked here on a journey. We have arrived here at COP from two different places. But we are connected by the fact that we are living in a broken world that has systemically marginalized women and girls, especially women and girls from vulnerable communities. Amal brought with her today, seeds. Seeds to physically share, seeds to inspire, seeds to represent hope. The beautiful thing about seeds is that you need to be selfless enough to be content in the fact that you may not eat the fruit or bear the flowers of these seeds that you have planted, but feel that it was worth it, knowing that your children will live with its beauty.”

SOUNDBITE (English) Breanna Fruean, Climate Activist, Samoa:
“I hope that these seeds Amal has journeyed here with today can inspire you all and remind you the importance of your role as planters of a global future.”

In a day that focused on themes of gender, science and innovation, key appearances and events spanned a wide range to draw attention to the ongoing struggle for gender equality, the significance of the disproportionate impact of the climate crisis on women and girls, and their contribution to meaningful climate action.

US Speaker of the House of Representatives Nancy Pelosi attended the summit on Tuesday, claiming a return of the United States to climate leadership and underscoring the value of and need for education of women and girls to lead on climate action when she stated, “if I ruled the world, the one thing that I would do, is invest in the education of women and girls, and their empowerment.”

SOUNDBITE (English) Nancy Pelosi, Speaker, House of Representatives, United States:
“Now people ask me all the time for many years, if you ruled the world, what one thing would you do? If I ruled the world, the one thing that I would do, is invest in the education of women and girls, and their empowerment.”

US Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez also arrived as part of the Congressional delegation to join the event on gender equality with Speaker Pelosi.

During a discussion chaired by Nicola Sturgeon, the Scottish First Minister noted “there is no doubt we must ensure that climate change is a feminist issue.”

SOUNDBITE (English) Nicola Sturgeon, First Minister, Scotland:
“There is no doubt we must ensure that climate change is a feminist issue. We must make sure that the experiences of women and girls across the world, so often disproportionately impacted by climate change, are understood as we devise the solutions.”

Tarcila Rivera Zea, an indigenous Quechuan activist from Peru, emphasized the need for indigenous women to be part of the decision-making process around climate change as they are inextricably linked to the world of biodiversity.

SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Tarcila Rivera Zea, indigenous Quechuan Activist, Peru:
“In that sense, the priority, for example when we heard that climate change and biodiversity were considered as interrelated, this perfectly allows indigenous women to be included. Because we cannot look at one aspect here, and other aspect there, but instead we have to look and the integrality of every aspect related to the lives of indigenous women.”

Second Lady of Ghana and Global Champion for Sustainable Energy for All (SE4ALL), Samira Bawumia, spoke of how the issue of clean cooking in Ghana is crosscutting and can resolve other needs such as education of women and girls and health, as poor cooking methods take time away from studies and cause health problems for families and the greater community that are preventable.

SOUNDBITE (English) Samira Bawumia, Global Champion, SE4ALL:
“Inefficient cooking has an impact on education. The girl goes out fetching firewood, it is time spent instead of studying, she’s out there looking for firewood inside rural communities. So, the way we cook, the way we find energy for cooking, it all directly impacts education for girls.”

SOUNDBITE (English) Samira Bawumia, Global Champion, SE4ALL:
“We are treating diseases, we are treating illnesses, but we could prevent those diseases, we could prevent indoor air pollution, by having clean cooking solutions. So, the impact on healthcare. So, there’s a lot of issues that could be resolved just in one fell swoop by dealing with clean cooking issues.”
Series
Category
Creator
UNIFEED
Alternate Title
unifeed211109b
Asset ID
2683803