OCHA / CLIMATE CHANGE RESILIENCY

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08-Nov-2021 00:02:21
In a world where return to normal is no longer possible, humanitarians and their partners will need to consolidate, coordinate and dramatically scale up efforts to make the people they serve more resilient, according to the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA). OCHA

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STORY: OCHA / CLIMATE CHANGE RESILIENCY
TRT: 02:21
SOURCE: OCHA
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: NATS

DATELINE: 05 NOVEMBER 2021, NEW YORK CITY / FILE

SHOTLIST:

RECENT – NEW YORK CITY

1. Wide shot, exterior, United Nations Headquarters

05 NOVEMBER 2021, NEW YORK CITY

2. SOUNDBITE (English) Hansjoerg Strohmeyer, Head of Policy, United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA):
“The climate crisis is a humanitarian crisis. And that crisis is now. Not in 2030, not in 2050, but for tens of millions of people in those most vulnerable countries, climate change is a daily reality and a daily struggle for their lives and livelihoods. And imagine, at currently 1.1 degrees global warming, we have one disaster after another. We're trying to cap at 1.5, which will already test the limits of the humanitarian system, but we are on a trajectory of 2.7 currently, which will lead to unprecedented proportions of human suffering humanitarian need across the world, not only in most vulnerable countries, but in places that we don't even think of delivering humanitarian assistance today. So, let's use Glasgow as a turning point because there will not be a return to normal. The climate crisis in most places is irreversible. We need to work differently. We need to be more integrated. We need to focus on communities’ resilience. We need to be more anticipatory and more lasting in our engagement with those communities.”

RECENT – NEW YORK CITY

3. Close up, UN flag

05 NOVEMBER 2021, NEW YORK CITY

4. SOUNDBITE (English) Quynh Nhu Tran, Humanitarian Affairs Officer, Policy Branch, United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA):
“The climate crisis is a threat multiplier for humanitarians we are seeing ever increasing need in the places where we work. In addition to dealing with conflict, displacement, we're also fighting floods and drought. At the same time, we're seeing new climate hotspots in places where we haven't traditionally worked. The best tool we have to fight the climate crisis is to help communities adapt and become more resilient. For humanitarians, the first principle is to do no harm. But this may be too passive. We do need to fight more actively to address inequality because for the communities that we work with women, children, indigenous groups and those who are displaced, we're seeing that they are at the greatest risk. Therefore, we must prioritize their needs as we fight the climate crisis.”

RECENT – NEW YORK CITY

5. Wide shot, UN flag

STORYLINE:

In a world where return to normal is no longer possible, humanitarians and their partners will need to consolidate, coordinate and dramatically scale up efforts to make the people they serve more resilient, according to the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA).

Ahead of the launch of the publication of a major report on climate and humanitarian aid, OCHA climate experts addressed the way forward in a world with unimaginable crises.

OCHA’s Head of Policy, Hansjoerg Strohmeyer, said, “the climate crisis is a humanitarian crisis. And that crisis is now. Not in 2030, not in 2050, but for tens of millions of people in those most vulnerable countries, climate change is a daily reality and a daily struggle for their lives and livelihoods. And imagine, at currently 1.1 degrees global warming, we have one disaster after another. We're trying to cap at 1.5, which will already test the limits of the humanitarian system, but we are on a trajectory of 2.7 currently, which will lead to unprecedented proportions of human suffering humanitarian need across the world, not only in most vulnerable countries, but in places that we don't even think of delivering humanitarian assistance today. So, let's use Glasgow as a turning point because there will not be a return to normal. The climate crisis in most places is irreversible. We need to work differently. We need to be more integrated. We need to focus on communities’ resilience. We need to be more anticipatory and more lasting in our engagement with those communities.”

For her part, OCHA’s Policy Branch Humanitarian Affairs Officer Quynh Nhu Tran, said, “The climate crisis is a threat multiplier for humanitarians we are seeing ever increasing need in the places where we work. In addition to dealing with conflict, displacement, we're also fighting floods and drought. At the same time, we're seeing new climate hotspots in places where we haven't traditionally worked. The best tool we have to fight the climate crisis is to help communities adapt and become more resilient. For humanitarians, the first principle is to do no harm. But this may be too passive. We do need to fight more actively to address inequality because for the communities that we work with women, children, indigenous groups and those who are displaced, we're seeing that they are at the greatest risk. Therefore, we must prioritize their needs as we fight the climate crisis.”
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