IFAD / BANGLADESH MONSOON SEASON

Preview Language:   Original
08-Nov-2021 00:03:31
Bangladesh is ranked seventh in the Global Climate Risk Index for countries most affected by extreme weather in the past two decades. The UN’s International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) is calling on governments to invest more to help the world’s poorest farmers to adapt to erratic weather. IFAD

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STORY: IFAD / BANGLADESH MONSOON SEASON
TRT: 3:31
SOURCE: IFAD
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / BENGALI / NATS

DATELINE: 26 AND 27 OCTOBER 2021, SUNAMGANJ DISTRICT AND SATKHIRA DISTRICT, BANGLADESH / ROME, ITALY

SHOTLIST:

1. Aerial shot, view of Bhinnakury, Sunamganj
2. Wide shot, boat on Jadukata river
3. Various shots, people on seasonal flood land
4. Various shots, storms and floods
5. Wide shot, people standing on limp of eroded land
6. Close up, foot on eroded land
7. Wide shot, eroded coastline with protective structure
8. SOUNDBITE (Bengali) Md. Nazrul Islam, Farmer:
“During the Flash Floods, our crops would get flooded and destroyed, and we did not have enough places to keep our harvested crops safe.”
9. Wide shot, Kujhati Village protection
10. Aerial shot, boat
11. SOUNDBITE (English) Jyotsna Puri, IFAD Associate vice-President, SKD:
"The poorest farmers are also the ones that are most responsible for our food. So perhaps in the most selfish sense of the word, we should invest in them so that we have food on our tables. One third of the food that we get and that we eat is produced by them. But in the overall and survival sense of the word, it's even more important to invest in the rural poor farmers because it is a question of survival for them. And unless we invest in them, we are not going to get the kind of resilience that we expect from this Earth.”
12. Various shots, people farming
13. Wide shot, Joysree GC- Golokpur GC via Sukhair Bazar Road in Sunamganj build under HILIP CALIP project, co-financed by IFAD
14. Wide shot, Meghna Baroghar village protection in Sunamganj District.
15. SOUNDBITE (Bengali) Lalon Mia, Farmer:
“Without this road, we could not access the community clinic, which had an impact on our health. Thanks to this submersible road, the youth also have access to employment opportunities.”
16. Wide shot, cows on road
17. Aerial shot, view of road
18. Wide shot, village greenery in Sumanganj
19. Various shots, people working in field
20. Various shots, community credit system
21. Various shots, Farmers
22. Wide shot, crab farm
23. Close up, woman working on crab cage
24. Close up, woman holding crab
25. Wide shot, Boat racing on Surma river in Sunamganj District
26. Aerial shot, view of Kaliarkuta Haor In Sunamganj District
27. Aerial shot, view of settlement
28. Aerial shot, view of village protection of Meghna Baroghar village surrounded by Kaliarkuta Haor and Meghna river


STORYLINE:

In Bangladesh, climate change is having a huge impact on the daily lives of its people.Over half the 90 million population now lives in high climate exposure and are at severe risk of flooding. Farmers, who are so dependent on the weather for their incomes, bear the brunt of this. Heavier rainfall has led to whole villages being cut off, making it challenging to get food to market, but also to grow and store food.


SOUNDBITE (Bengali) Md. Nazrul Islam, Farmer:
“During the Flash Floods, our crops would get flooded and destroyed, and we did not have enough places to keep our harvested crops safe.”

Millions of small scale farmers around the world are facing similar devastating effects from erratic weather and increased natural disasters, leading to increased hunger and poverty.

As COP26 in Glasgow enters its second week, The UN’s International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) is calling on governments to put the needs of small-scale farmers at the centre of climate financing discussions to help them adapt.

Currently only 1.7 per cent of climate finance – a fraction of what is needed - goes to small-scale farmers in developing countries despite their disproportionate vulnerability to the impacts of climate change. Of every $18 of mitigation finance, only $1 goes towards adaptation.

SOUNDBITE (English) Jyotsna Puri, IFAD Associate vice-President, SKD:
"The poorest farmers are also the ones that are most responsible for our food. So perhaps in the most selfish sense of the word, we should invest in them so that we have food on our tables. One third of the food that we get and that we eat is produced by them. But in the overall and survival sense of the word, it's even more important to invest in the rural poor farmers because it is a question of survival for them. And unless we invest in them, we are not going to get the kind of resilience that we expect from this Earth.”

In Bangladesh, more persistent rainfall due to climate change means that places like the Haor region are flooded for up to six months a year.

The land is submerged, forcing local people out of work and making it difficult for them to access food.

Helping farmers adapt to this weather change is vital. IFAD has worked with the Government of Bangladesh to provide them with early warning systems, and to build 230km of barriers against damaging wave action and more than 700 km of submersible roads to give people access to food, markets, jobs and medical facilities.

SOUNDBITE (Bengali) Lalon Mia, Farmer:
“Without this road, we could not access the community clinic, which had an impact on our health. Thanks to this submersible road, the youth also have access to employment opportunities.”

These types of investments in climate adaptation have helped over 1.5 million people in Bangladesh to be better prepared for and resilient to climate change.
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Geographic Subjects
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IFAD
Alternate Title
unifeed211108c
Asset ID
2682493