BANGLADESH / CLIMATE CHANGE ROHINGYA REFUGEES

Preview Language:   Original
03-Nov-2021 00:08:06
Climate change is increasing the frequency and intensity of cyclones that threaten both Bangladeshis and the Rohingya refugees living in the hastily constructed settlements in Cox’s Bazar District. UNHCR

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TITLE: BANGLADESH / CLIMATE CHANGE ROHINGYA REFUGEES
TRT: 8:06
SOURCE: UNHCR
RESTRICTIONS: PLEASE CREDIT UNHCR ON SCREEN
LANGAUGE: ROHINGYA / NATS

DATELINE: PLEASE CHECK SHOTLIST

SHOTLIST:

11 NOVEMBER 2017, COX’S BAZAR, BANGLADESH

1. Various shots, drone shot of camps and refugees

16 OCTOBRE 2017, COX’S BAZAR, BANGLADESH

2. Drone shot, camp with big tree towering over

JUNE 2018, COX’S BAZAR, BANGLADESH
3. Wide shot, refugees walking carrying their belonging being relocated
4. Close up, water running in the mud

12-13 OCTOBER 2021, COX’S BAZAR, BANGLADESH

5. SOUNDBITE (ROHINGYA) Abdul, Volunteer Rescue Team:
“When there are floods, after a heavy storm, people who live in the low land houses suffer the most.”

30 JULY 2021, COX’S BAZAR, BANGLADESH

6. Wide shot, flooded street

12-13 OCTOBER 2021, COX’S BAZAR, BANGLADESH
7. SOUNDBITE (ROHINGYA) Abdul, Volunteer Rescue Team:
“Elderly people, pregnant women find it extremely difficult to move from one place to another place and little children are at great risk of drowning.”

30 JULY 2021, COX’S BAZAR, BANGLADESH

8. Wide shot, flooded street

12-13 OCTOBER 2021, COX’S BAZAR, BANGLADESH

9. SOUNDBITE (ROHINGYA) Abdul, Volunteer Rescue Team:
Our office sends a warning if there is the possibility of a storm or cyclone, and we immediately alert people in the community.”

FEBRUARY 2021, COX’S BAZAR, BANGLADESH

10. Various shots, elderly refugee woman with her family

12-13 OCTOBER 2021, COX’S BAZAR, BANGLADESH

11. SOUNDBITE (ROHINGYA) Abdul, Volunteer Rescue Team:
“We help carry the people who are unable to move to the shelter.”
12. Wide shot, Abul Osman giving instruction to the safety unit
13. SOUNDBITE (ROHINGYA) Abdul, Volunteer Rescue Team:
“Last year, there was flooding four times and this year, flash floods happened three or four times already.”
14. Wide shot, Abul Osman giving instruction to the safety unit
15. SOUNDBITE (ROHINGYA) Abdul, Volunteer Rescue Team:
“I am glad that we are able to reduce the impact of these disasters, even a little.”
16. Various shots, safety unit volunteers are going around people’s house to create awareness
17. SOUNDBITE (ROHINGYA) Abdul, Volunteer Rescue Team:
“We are trying our best to save our community.”


28 JULY 2021, COX’S BAZAR, BANGLADESH

11. Wide shot, kids swimming in the flooded river

2018, COX’S BAZAR, BANGLADESH

12. Various shots, landslide damages

12-13 OCTOBER 2021, COX’S BAZAR, BANGLADESH

13. Wide shot, safety unit volunteers are going around with siren to alert the community crossing bridge
14. Wide shot, kids playing in the water
15. Wide shot, siren being activated

FEBRUARY 2021, COX’S BAZAR, BANGLADESH

16. Wide shot, hanging plant pot

12-13 OCTOBER 2021, COX’S BAZAR, BANGLADESH

17. SOOUNDBITE (Rohingya) Mohammed, Tree Planting Cooperative:
“Our work is to look after the trees.”
18. Wide shot, Rohingya volunteers carrying trees
19. SOOUNDBITE (Rohingya) Mohammed, Tree Planting Cooperative:
“Every day, we work for eight hours taking care of these trees.”
20. Wide shot, Rohingya volunteers planting trees
21. SOOUNDBITE (Rohingya) Mohammed, Tree Planting Cooperative:
“Trees produce oxygen for both humans and animals.”
22. Wide shot, Rohingya volunteers carrying trees
23. SOOUNDBITE (Rohingya) Mohammed, Tree Planting Cooperative:
- “During the monsoon season, many trees get damaged. We try to preserve them and replant them somewhere else.”
24. Wide shot, animal
25. Wide shot, kids swimming it flooded water
26. SOOUNDBITE (Rohingya) Mohammed, Tree Planting Cooperative:
“If anyone tries to cut the trees, we convince them not to. This is part of our work.”
27. Various shots, Rohingya volunteers planting trees

16 NOVEMBRE 2018, COX’S BAZAR, BANGLADESH

28. Drone shot, camp

12-13 OCTOBER 2021, COX’S BAZAR, BANGLADESH

25. SOUNDBITE (English) Hamida, Mother:
– “It used to be very difficult to collect firewood because there was no one to take care of my children while I was gone. I had to ensure that I had collected enough firewood so I could prepare meals for my children on time.”
26. Various shots, Hamida Cooking food with Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG)
27. SOUNDBITE (English) Hamida, Mother:
“With this gas cylinder there is no smoke in my house and we can breathe better. I can give food to my children on time. I can spend time with them in a clean space.”
28. Various shots, Hamida Cooking food with Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG)
29. SOUNDBITE (English) Hamida, Mother:
- “I am also planting trees along the fence where the seeds can be protected. They will grow into trees and create some shade so other trees can grow. I enjoy the flowers and we can eat the fruits from these trees.”
30 Various shots, Hamida working in the garden
31. SOUNDBITE (Rohingya) Abdul, Volunteer Rescue Team:
“I have one request to you all, please extend your hands and work together to help us fight climate change.”

20 NOVEMBER 2018, COX’S BAZAR, BANGLADESH

32. Wide shot, LPG distribution center
33. Wide shot, Abdul Walking in the camps

STORYLINE:

Bangladesh is home to the largest refugee camp in the world. Kutupalong is a sprawling, densely populated area that is home to some 900,000 refugees, the majority of whom arrived in 2017 after fleeing violence and human rights abuses in Myanmar. In response to the influx over a period of just a few months, the Bangladeshi government allocated a 2,500-hectare sweep of protected forest to expand an existing settlement.

Vegetation was cleared to make way for shelters and infrastructure. Lacking alternative cooking fuels, refugees cut many of the remaining trees for firewood. What had been a sanctuary for wildlife, including endangered Asian elephants, quickly became a bare, hilly tract of bamboo and plastic-roofed shelters that was prone to flooding and landslides in the monsoon season.

The risks from such events are on the rise.

Bangladesh has always been buffeted by tropical storms and flooding, but climate change is increasing the frequency and intensity of cyclones that threaten both Bangladeshis and the Rohingya refugees living in the hastily constructed settlements in Cox’s Bazar District.
Between June and October, torrential rains batter the camps, collapsing hillsides, submerging makeshift shelters, and displacing the refugees once again. This year alone, some 24,000 refugees were forced to abandon their homes and belongings and 10 refugees lost their lives during particularly heavy rains in late July.

To reduce these risks, UNHCR and its partners set out in 2018 to restore the forest ecosystem and stabilize hillsides through a project to plant fast-growing indigenous species of trees, shrubs and grasses. More than 3,000 Bangladeshis and Rohingya refugees have received training on how to manage tree nurseries, plant and care for seedlings, and protect the young trees.

Three years on, the refugees have replanted an area of more than 600 hectares – nearly twice the size of New York’s Central Park. Grasses have also been planted in streams to help treat wastewater and reduce pollution levels.

The reforestation project’s success has hinged to a large degree on the roll-out of Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG) to refugees and local community households as an alternative to firewood, which refugees were stripping from the surrounding forest at a rate of 700 tonnes a day to meet their essential energy needs.

Abdul, at 21 years old, is a refugee volunteer working with a group that helps vulnerable people in the camp get to safety during heavy monsoon rains and flooding
Mohammed and a group of “plantation guardians” protecting tree sanctuaries and nurseries in the camp.

Hamida, a mother of six, switched to cooking with gas, which is available throughout the camp. Now she can spend more time with her children and is also planting trees around her shelter to reap the benefits of a greener space.
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UNHCR
Alternate Title
unifeed211103e
Asset ID
2680629