MADAGASCAR / CLIMATE INDUCED FAMINE

Preview Language:   Original
02-Nov-2021 00:05:59
As climate talks get underway in Glasgow, families in Southern Madagascar, where climate is driving famine-like conditions, brace themselves for yet another harsh year ahead as the ongoing drought shows no signs of abating, signaling deteriorating hunger. WFP

Available Language: English
Type
Language
Format
Acquire
/
English
Other Formats
Description
STORY: MADAGASCAR / CLIMATE INDUCED FAMINE
TRT: 5:59
SOURCE: WFP
RESTRICTIONS: PLEASE CREDIT WFP ON SCREEN
LANGUAGE: MALAGASY / ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: PLEASE CHECK SHOTLIST

SHOTLIST:

14 OCTOBER 2021, MAROFANONY VILLAGE, MADAGASCAR

1. Wide shot, Marofanony village
Sandstorms cripple what remains of agriculture in this drought stricken village near the southern tip of Madagascar. Here crowds of children are being tested with Middle Upper Arm Circumference tape (MUAC) for malnutrition by Mamy Razanamahefa, a WFP nutritionist. As the red in the band indicates, many, way too many, of them are shown to be severely malnourished.
2. Wide shot, Masy Celestinea collecting cactus flowers
47-year-old Masy Celestinea collects cactus flowers to eat. She can’t even wait for the fruits to form. She lost her 8-month grandson because too many seeds from the cactus fruits he was surviving on accumulated in his stomach.
3. SOUNDBITE (Malagasy)Masy Celestinea:
“This is what we eat; this is all the people in the village eat. Because it's been 5 years since there was any rain. Those who had herds of zebus have no more, because they have sold all their cattle. Look at our crops, there are no leaves growing, not even one. When you pass on the road, you can see, it's dry. There are only sandy winds.”
4. SOUNDBITE (Malagasy) Masy Celestinea:
(When asked what message she would have for leaders of industrialized countries meeting at COP in Glasgow)
“You know, the forest has its life, the human being has its life, the forest has its blood, and all of us human beings too. I have a sad heart because the rain does not fall anymore, and Madagascar is a victim of it. I have a sad heart because the rain does not fall. There is not even dew, but just high winds blowing, so I have a sad heart. it’s breaking my heart.”

12 OCTOBER 2021, AMBOYOMBE, MADGASCAR

5. Wide shot, family eating a soup made from cactus leaves
6. Various shots, dry rivers

13 OCTOBER 2021, MANAMBOVA RIVER, MADGASCAR

7. Wide shot, aerial, people digging in the dry riverbed for water and washing (no audio)

13 OCTOBER 2021, AMBOYOMBE, MADGASCAR

8. Wide shot, market, The price of sweet potatoes hasx increased by 8-fold in 2 years

13 OCTOBER 2021, FAUX CAP

9. Wide shot, people collecting seawater for washing and cooking. It is also being drunk.

12 OCTOBER 2021, AMBOYOMBE, MADGASCAR

10. Wide shot, nutrition testing, children being tested for malnutrition and being treated with special peanut based nutritional products provided by WFP at a clinic.
11. Wide shot, WFP nutritionist Anna Horner testing children for malnutrition
12. SOUNDBITE (English) Arduino Mangoni, Dep. Country Director WFP Madagascar:
“Because of the drought, because of the sandstorms-this is a new phenomenon that has manifested in the last couple of years itself-prices are skyrocketing because of the very poor agricultural production and people do not have enough food to eat…they don’t have the money to have access to the food and malnutrition rates are augmenting. //These people have not contributed to climate change but they are paying probably the highest price.”

14 OCTOBER 2021, AMBOYOMBE, MADGASCAR

13. Wide shot, WFP food distribution of maize, oil, salt and special peanut based nutritional products for mothers and babies who are affected by the drought.
14. Wide shot, Malnourished children eating special peanut based nutritional food provided by WFP

STORYLINE:

As climate talks get underway in Glasgow, families in Southern Madagascar, where climate is driving famine-like conditions, brace themselves for yet another harsh year ahead as the ongoing drought shows no signs of abating, signaling deteriorating hunger.

Severe hunger has touched over 1.1 million people with 14,000 of them one step away from famine. The situation, already alarming, is set to worsen by the end of year with the number of people in famine-like conditions expected to double.

“The changing climate has meant that many families who were able to live off the land 15 years ago have now fallen into severe hunger. Families are scavenging for survival and many are living only on the food assistance they receive,” said Menghestab Haile, WFP Regional Director, Southern Africa. I recently met a mother who told me that she had lost her 8-month-old to seeds from cactus fruit that had accumulated in his stomach. The face of hunger in Southern Madagascar is horrific.”

The drought has led to the complete disappearance of food sources leaving families visibly famished and resorting to survival measures such as eating locusts, wild leaves and cactus leaves which are usually fed to cattle. Vulnerable children are bearing the brunt of the crisis with malnutrition in under-fives expected to quadruple, crossing the half million mark by April 2022.

"The number of malnourished children coming to health centres in Southern Madagascar has doubled compared to this time last year. Many of them are too weak to laugh or cry, let alone play and learn,” said Anna Horner, WFP’s Chief of Nutrition Innovative Financing, who recently visited Southern Madagascar. “The physical and mental damage to children due to malnutrition can be irreversible. It is heart-wrenching to see so many young minds and bodies unnecessarily suffering from hunger and malnutrition.”

Amidst the hottest decade on record, Madagascar has suffered from exceptionally warm temperatures, deficits in rainfall and unexpected sandstorms that have covered fields, left crops wilted and harvests well below average. By April 2021, 70 per cent of the Grand Sud was in drought with food production only a third of the last five-year average. The forecasted dry start to the upcoming planting season means families will not be able to sow their fields immediately and their access to food and an income hangs in the balance. Adding to an already dire situation, a recent upsurge of locusts is expected to affect an estimated 400,000 hectares of land.

WFP has been reaching around 700,000 people monthly with emergency life-saving food as well as supplementary nutrition products for pregnant and nursing women and children. Moving beyond emergency support, WFP together with the government, is implementing long-term resilience building activities that help communities adapt to the changing climate. These include access to water, reforestation, sand dune stabilization and economic support like access to microinsurance schemes in case of crop failure.

In September, 3,500 insured farmers received a payout of US$100 to recover losses from the failed maize crop. The payout helped families sustain themselves despite a lost harvest.
WFP aims to scale up its response in Southern Madagascar and urgently needs US$69 million over the next six months. WFP is increasingly concerned about the situation in Madagascar and has been ringing the alarm bells over the climate-induced hunger crisis, one of the potentially many in the world.
Series
Category
Topical Subjects
Geographic Subjects
Corporate Subjects
Creator
WFP
Alternate Title
unifeed211102a
Asset ID
2679906