WMO / WEATHER CLIMATE DATA FINANCING MECHANISM

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29-Oct-2021 00:02:57
Three United Nations organisations are taking the lead in the response to climate change and will announce a new financing mechanism to fill the gaps in basic weather and climate data at the COP26 climate summit in Glasgow which begins on 31 October. WMO

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STORY: WMO / WEATHER CLIMATE DATA FINANCING MECHANISM
TRT: 2:57
SOURCE: WMO
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LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS
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SHOTLIST:

FILE – WMO – UN FLAG, ROME ITALY

1. Wide shot, UN Flag

FILE – WMO - panel powers and array of weather instuments, Point Loma Ecological Reserve

2. Med shot, automatic Weather Station
3. Wide shot, automatic Weather Station near ocean

FILE – WMO

4. Various shots, computer visual, weather data

FILE –WMO – hurricane spinning in ocean from satellite from above

5. Wide shot, from weather satellite of hurricane

WMO – 18 June 2021, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND

6. Med shot, Petteri Taalas, WMO Secretary-General, analysing data graph
7. Close up, analysing data graph
8. Med shot, Petteri Taalas, WMO Secretary-General, analysing data graph
9. SOUNBITE (English) Petteri Taalas, WMO Secretary-General:
“If you don’t have observations then you are not able to produce good forecasts and have major data gaps in observing systems in Africa, Caribbean, Pacific Islands and some parts of Latin America. Those countries are not able to provide the high-quality early warning services because they do not have enough input data for the forecast models.”

FILE – WMO – Flooded area in countryside of Slovenia.

10. Wide shot, aerial shot of flooding in Europe

FILE – WMO – Barren Land

11. Close up, ground showing drought and dry conditions.

FILE – WMO – Hyderbad, Flooded houses and the city

12. Wide shot, street flooded in South Asia

UNDP – 5 March 2021, New York, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

13. SOUNDBITE (English) Achim Steiner, Administrator of UNDP:
“Extreme weather and climate events are now increasing in frequency and intensity and severity as a result of climate change. Vulnerable communities are the hardest hit. To help address this they need access to the very best of technology to adapt to the effects of climate change and reduce risk.”

FILE –WMO

14. Med shot, women looking at rain gauge and observing weather conditions
15. Wide shot, inspection of weather station equipment
16. Wide shot, weather reading instrument near ocean

UNEP – 23 SEPTEMBER 2021, NAIROBI, KENYA

17. SOUNDBITE (English) Inger Andersen, Executive Director of UNEP:
“As we look towards a planet potentially hurtling towards three degrees Celsius at the end of the century, the necessary action that will be required for effective mitigation and adaptation must be underpinned by the best available science and data. SOFF is key in achieving this.”

FILE – WMO – SEA SWELL BREAKING ON COAST DURING STROM EL NINO

18. Wide shot, rough seas and waves

FILE – WMO – FRANCE, MONTPELLIER FLOODED HIGHWAY

19. Wide shot, road with busy traffic during heavy rain and storms

FILE – WMO - FRANCE, MONTPELLIER ANTIGONE, FLOODED STREET

20. Med shot, car driving through flooded roads

FILE – WMO – Muddy water from river

21. Wide shot, flooded street with debris

FILE – WMO

22. Wide shot, wildfire and smoke
23. Wide shot, car driving past hurricane damage of houses and fallen over trees.

STORYLINE:

Three United Nations organisations are taking the lead in the response to climate change and will announce a new financing mechanism to fill the gaps in basic weather and climate data at the COP26 climate summit in Glasgow which begins on 31 October.

The World Meteorological Organization (WMO), the UN Development Programme (UNDP) and the UN’s Environment Programme (UNEP) along with multiple international partners, are coming together to strengthen the international response to climate change.

The so-called Systematic Observations Finance Facility (The SOFF) will fill the data gaps that undermine our understanding of past and current climate, as well as our capacity to predict and project future climate scenarios. This, in turn, weakens international efforts to prepare for and respond to extreme weather events, such as floods, hurricanes and drought.

SOUNBITE (English) Petteri Taalas, WMO Secretary-General:
“If you don’t have observations then you are not able to produce good forecasts and have major data gaps in observing systems in Africa, Caribbean, Pacific Islands and some parts of Latin America. Those countries are not able to provide the high-quality early warning services because they do not have enough input data for the forecast models.”

Over the next ten years, the SOFF will build capacity in 75 Small Islands Developing States and Least Developed Countries to enable them to generate and exchange essential weather and climate data, in compliance with internationally agreed standards of GBON.

The SOFF will have life-saving impact in the most vulnerable countries to climate change, where decades of progress can be wiped out by a single extreme event. However, the benefits of SOFF will be felt everywhere. Countries across the globe will have access to improved weather forecasts and climate services, at a critical time when impacts of climate change are intensifying.

SOUNDBITE (English) Achim Steiner, Administrator of UNDP:
“Extreme weather and climate events are now increasing in frequency and intensity and severity as a result of climate change. Vulnerable communities are the hardest hit. To help address this they need access to the very best of technology to adapt to the effects of climate change and reduce risk.”

Recognising the value of the SOFF, countries are already providing indications of financial contribution of millions of dollars. The total of pledges will be unveiled at the event in Glasgow on 3 November.

SOUNDBITE (English) Inger Andersen, Executive Director of UNEP:
“As we look towards a planet potentially hurtling towards three degrees Celsius at the end of the century, the necessary action that will be required for effective mitigation and adaptation must be underpinned by the best available science and data. SOFF is key in achieving this.”
Potential global disaster management benefits enabled by the SOFF are estimated at 66 billion US dollars per year and improved economic production resulting from better planning is estimated at about 96 billion US dollars annual. Weather-sensitive sectors such as agriculture, water, energy, transportation, construction and insurance will see the greatest benefits.
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