WHO / MALARIA VACCINE

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06-Oct-2021 00:05:06
WHO Director-General Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus announced the Organization’s recommendation for the “broad use of the world’s first malaria vaccine,” adding that the long-awaited vaccine “is a breakthrough for science, child health and malaria control.” WHO

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STORY: WHO / MALARIA VACCINE
TRT: 5:06
SOURCE: WHO
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LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 06 OCTOBER 2021, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND / FILE

SHOTLIST:

FILE – GENEVA, SWITZERLAND

1. Wide shot, WHO emblem outside headquarters

06 OCTOBER 2021, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND

2. Wide shot, WHO officials at press conference
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director-General, World Health Organization (WHO):
“Today, WHO is recommending the broad use of the world’s first malaria vaccine. This recommendation is based on results from an ongoing pilot programme in Ghana, Kenya and Malawi that has reached more than 800,000 children since 2019. This long-awaited malaria vaccine is a breakthrough for science, child health and malaria control. Using this vaccine in addition to existing tools to prevent malaria could save tens of thousands of young lives each year.”
4. Wide shot, WHO officials at press conference
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director-General, World Health Organization (WHO):
“Malaria has been with us for millennia, and the dream of a malaria vaccine has been a long-held but unattainable dream. Today, the RTS,S malaria vaccine – more than 30 years in the making – changes the course of public health history. We still have a very long road to travel. But this is a long stride down that road. This vaccine is a gift to the world, but its value will be felt most in Africa, because that’s where the burden of malaria is greatest.”
6. Wide shot, WHO officials at press conference
7. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director-General, World Health Organization (WHO):
“Today is a very historic day because it's not only this vaccine is just for malaria, the first vaccine just for malaria, but it's also the first vaccine for any parasitic disease. So, it will open up opportunities for other diseases as well in the control of other diseases as well.”
8. Wide shot, WHO officials at press conference
9. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Matshidiso Moeti, Regional Director for Africa, World Health Organization (WHO):
“The RTS,S vaccine is a game changer and it's arriving at the right time. Progress in reducing the malaria burden in Africa has stalled in recent years, and innovative tools and approaches are urgently needed to get the global malaria control effort back on track. In the African region, we've already started a consultative process of rethinking malaria to look at the barriers to progress and how to overcome them. With the RTS,S vaccine and other anticipated changes in the malaria business model, we expect to see greater impacts on the malaria burden in Africa in the very near future.”
10. Wide shot, WHO officials at press conference
11. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Alejandro Cravioto, Chair, Strategic Advisory Group of Experts on Immunization (SAGE), World Health Organization (WHO):
“I think that the experience we have had before with other infections showed us clearly that a child that is repeatedly sick is maimed for life. And that means that he or she is not capable of developing the capacities that he or she is born with in the sense of achieving an adulthood that will be meaningful for him or her and their community. So, in that sense, having anything that protects them or helps them to be less sick during this growth phase is essential for us as a community in the sense of having a much better group of people that can really help us change the coming world.”
12. Wide shot, WHO officials at press conference
13. SOUNDBITE (English) Professor Dyann Wirth, Chair, Malaria Policy Advisory Group (MPAG), World Health Organization (WHO):
“This is the first ever vaccine for a human parasite and demonstrates that a vaccine is possible for this challenging infection. While ongoing threats to our existing tools, drug resistant parasites, insecticide resistant mosquitoes, innovation is needed not only to create new tools, but to better tailor our current tools to achieve maximum impact. The malaria parasite is a formidable foe, and while we are excited by this recent development, major battles remain.”

FILE – APRIL 2019, MALAWI

14. Wide shots, mother covering child with net
16. Close up, syringe being loaded with vaccine
17. Med shot, health worker loading syringe with vaccine
18. Med shot, child being vaccinated

FILE – APRIL 2019, GHANA

20. Med shot, health worker loading syringe with vaccine
21. Med shot, child being vaccinated

FILE – NOVEMBER 2018, MOZAMBIQUE

22. Close up, writing on back of malaria prevention team member
23. Wide shot, malaria prevention team member walking to home
24. Various shots, malaria prevention team member fumigating home

STORYLINE:

WHO Director-General Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus announced the Organization’s recommendation for the “broad use of the world’s first malaria vaccine,” adding that the long-awaited vaccine “is a breakthrough for science, child health and malaria control.”

At a press conference held in Geneva today (06 Oct), Dr Tedros said the recommendation is based on results from an ongoing pilot programme in Ghana, Kenya and Malawi that has reached more than 800,000 children since 2019.

He said, “Malaria has been with us for millennia, and the dream of a malaria vaccine has been a long-held but unattainable dream. Today, the RTS,S malaria vaccine – more than 30 years in the making – changes the course of public health history. We still have a very long road to travel. But this is a long stride down that road. This vaccine is a gift to the world, but its value will be felt most in Africa, because that’s where the burden of malaria is greatest.”

Malaria remains a primary cause of childhood illness and death in sub-Saharan Africa. More than 260 000 African children under the age of five die from malaria annually.

The WHO chief said, “Today is a very historic day because it's not only this vaccine is just for malaria, the first vaccine just for malaria, but it's also the first vaccine for any parasitic disease. So, it will open up opportunities for other diseases as well in the control of other diseases as well.”

WHO Regional Director for Africa Dr Matshidiso Moeti said the RTS,S vaccine is a “game changer and it's arriving at the right time.” She said progress in reducing the malaria burden in Africa has stalled in recent years, and innovative tools and approaches are urgently needed to get the global malaria control effort back on track. She added that a consultative process of rethinking malaria to look at the barriers to progress and how to overcome them has already started in the African region. She said, “With the RTS,S vaccine and other anticipated changes in the malaria business model, we expect to see greater impacts on the malaria burden in Africa in the very near future.”

Dr Alejandro Cravioto, Chair of WHO’s Strategic Advisory Group of Experts on Immunization (SAGE), said experiences with other infections showed us clearly that “a child that is repeatedly sick is maimed for life.” He added, “That means that he or she is not capable of developing the capacities that he or she is born with in the sense of achieving an adulthood that will be meaningful for him or her and their community. So, in that sense, having anything that protects them or helps them to be less sick during this growth phase is essential for us as a community in the sense of having a much better group of people that can really help us change the coming world.”

Professor Dyann Wirth, Chair of WHO’s Malaria Policy Advisory Group (MPAG), noted that this is the first-ever vaccine for a human parasite and demonstrates that a vaccine is possible for this challenging infection. She said, “While ongoing threats to our existing tools, drug resistant parasites, insecticide resistant mosquitoes, innovation is needed not only to create new tools, but to better tailor our current tools to achieve maximum impact. The malaria parasite is a formidable foe, and while we are excited by this recent development, major battles remain.”

WHO recommends that in the context of comprehensive malaria control the RTS,S/AS01 malaria vaccine be used for the prevention of P. falciparum malaria in children living in regions with moderate to high transmission as defined by WHO. RTS,S/AS01 malaria vaccine should be provided in a schedule of 4 doses in children from 5 months of age for the reduction of malaria disease and burden.
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