SOUTH SUDAN / UNMAS SAFE GROUND

Preview Language:   Original
04-Oct-2021 00:03:02
The United Nations Mine Action Service (UNMAS) recently held an event marking the clearing and destruction of some 41 explosive ordnances in Ngulere, South Sudan, by holding a football match for community members on the newly decontaminated land. UNMISS

Available Language: English
Type
Language
Format
Acquire
/
English
Other Formats
Description
STORY: SOUTH SUDAN / UNMAS SAFE GROUND
TRT: 3:02
SOURCE: UNMISS
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 04 OCTOBER 2021, CENTRAL EQUATORIA, SOUTH SUDAN

SHOTLIST:

04 OCTOBER 2021, CENTRAL EQUATORIA, SOUTH SUDAN

1. Zoom out, Ngulere
2. Pan left, discarded ammunition
3. Med shots, discarded unexploded ordinance and weapons
4. Wide shot, UNMAS demining camp
5. Med shot, UNMAS Safe Ground banner
6. Wide shot, local football match
7. SOUNDBITE (English) Goran Tomasevic, Deputy Chief of Operations, United Nations Mine Action Service (UNMAS):
“In this particular village we deployed one of our teams, an UNMAS-contracted team, the Development Initiative, a clearance asset who only completed clearance recently and apart from removing a number of mainly mortar, and some projectiles from the village and in between houses, they also located, removed and subsequently destroyed 12 60-millimeter mortar that were buried somewhere in this football field.”
8. Wide shot, UNMAS female deminer in action
9. Tilt down, UXO area
10. Med shot, discarded unexploded ordinance
11. Pan right, UNMAS deminers camp
12. Close up, Deminer Personal Protective Gear
13. SOUNDBITE (English) Rebecca Bellrose, Programme Officer, United Nations Mine Action Service (UNMAS):
“The Safe Ground initiative is a five-year initiative that started in 2019 and ends in 2023. The thematic area for this initiative or for this campaign is to turn minefields into playing fields. So, with that said, we see contaminated areas in close vicinity to schools, or to playgrounds or where children convene, and we clear that contamination.”
14. Various shots, UNMAS team members explain to school children how to identify dangerous items
15. SOUNDBITE (English) Goran Tomasevic, Deputy Chief of Operations, United Nations Mine Action Service (UNMAS):
“This is a very good example of how clearance can be put into good use. In this case, we cleared this football pitch but we — and when I say we I mean UNMISS and partners — we are clearing schools. We are clearing roads. We are clearing clinics. We are providing support not just to the mission but also to our humanitarian partners. It just feels great being part of that.”
16. Wide shot, Football match in progress

STORYLINE:

While gunshots may not be a familiar sound across South Sudan anymore, the remnants of civil wars remain in a far more tangible form than anybody could imagine. These are landmines and explosive remnants of war, which pose a daily threat to women, children and men in remote locations across the world’s youngest country.

The United Nations Mine Action Service (UNMAS) has been working in South Sudan since 2004, clearing some 45 million square meters of land contaminated by explosive hazards. UNMAS recently held an event marking the clearing and destruction of some 41 explosive ordnances in Ngulere, Central Equatoria, by holding a football match for community members on the newly decontaminated land.

SOUNDBITE (English) Goran Tomasevic, Deputy Chief of Operations, United Nations Mine Action Service (UNMAS):
“In this particular village we deployed one of our teams, an UNMAS-contracted team, the Development Initiative, a clearance asset who only completed clearance recently and apart from removing a number of mainly mortar, and some projectiles from the village and in between houses, they also located, removed and subsequently destroyed 12 60-millimeter mortar that were buried somewhere in this football field.”

Working carefully with a small team of around five deminers, UNMAS took approximately two months to clear the area which is now a football field. It was particularly time-consuming because they had to work alongside homes of community members and had to keep residents safe at all times.

The event was part of the five-year Safe Ground project launched by UNMAS, which aims at uniting communities through sports and ensuring children can complete their education in a safe environment.

SOUNDBITE (English) Rebecca Bellrose, Programme Officer, United Nations Mine Action Service (UNMAS):
“The Safe Ground initiative is a five-year initiative that started in 2019 and ends in 2023. The thematic area for this initiative or for this campaign is to turn minefields into playing fields. So, with that said, we see contaminated areas in close vicinity to schools, or to playgrounds or where children convene, and we clear that contamination.”

For residents, the removal of these deadly reminders of a bloody past shall ensure trade prospers, children thrive, and people can live without fear. For the UNMAS team, it’s time to see firsthand the impact their work has on the lives of communities they are on the ground to protect.

SOUNDBITE (English) Goran Tomasevic, Deputy Chief of Operations, United Nations Mine Action Service (UNMAS):
“This is a very good example of how clearance can be put into good use. In this case, we cleared this football pitch but we — and when I say we I mean UNMISS and partners — we are clearing schools. We are clearing roads. We are clearing clinics. We are providing support not just to the mission but also to our humanitarian partners. It just feels great being part of that.”
Series
Category
Topical Subjects
Geographic Subjects
Creator
UNMISS
Alternate Title
unifeed211004g
Asset ID
2663005