WHO / NIGERIA CERVICAL CANCER PREVENTION

Preview Language:   Original
01-Oct-2021 00:05:12
Cervical cancer is curable if diagnosed and treated early. The tragedy is that while this type of cancer is preventable, poor access to prevention, screening and treatment contributes to 90 per cent of deaths. In Nigeria, WHO partner RAiSE Foundation is working to improve access to cervical cancer screening and prevention. WHO

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WHO / NIGERIA CERVICAL CANCER
TRT: 5:12
SOURCE: WHO
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 16-17 FEBRUARY 2021, MIINA, NIGERIA

SHOTLIST:

17 FEBRUARY 2021, MINNA, NIGERIA

1. Drone shot, town of Minna, Nigeria

16 FEBRUARY 2021, Minna, Nigeria

2. Med shot, Mohammad Kolo speaks during a radio show: “Yes, for the purpose of continuity for most efficient and effective control of cervical cancer, how regular should a test be, as a way of follow up?
3. Close up, audio mixer and Mohammed Kolo's hand
4. Close up, Mohammad Kolo asking a question to the show’s guest, Dr Amina Abubakar Bello
5. Various shots, Dr. Bello responding to the question: "We recommend everyone has it every year. Cervical cancer is the second commonest cancer that affects women. But the recommendation is that a child should have that [HPV] vaccine. The Nigerian government has pledged that at the first quarter of this year, HPV vaccines will be available for us in Nigeria. So we are waiting to see.”
6. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Amina Abubakar Bello, Gynecologiest/Obstetrician and Founder of RAiSE Foundation:
“It's a very conservative society. It's a place where you don't talk about such private matters outwardly. So a lot of women would keep those kind of private things to themselves, when they start having symptoms, they will not present on time. So those are some of the things that have made something like cervical cancer to stay so long before patients or women come into the hospital.
7. Various shots, women listening to Dr Bello at the RAiSE Foundation Screening Centre
8. Med shot, Dr. Bello speaking to the women waiting for screenings at the centre
9. Med shot, women listening to Dr Bello (Veronica in the front)
10. Med shot, Dr. Bello speaking to the women at the centre
11. SOUNDBITE (English) Veronica, recovered cervical cancer patient who was treated at RAiSE Foundation:
“To really come and screen is not easy. It's a bold step. I would encourage them to not be afraid. Come and screen yourself - it’s better than you being out there without screening. For women. Don't be scared. Just come. I know it is not easy, but come and do your screening to know whether there's something there or not. If there is something they will treat you immediately, they will take care of you.”

17 FEBRUARY 2021, MINNA, NIGERIA

12. Various shots, Veronica getting water from a well at her house
13. Wide shot, Veronica making a fire

16 FEBRUARY 2021, MINNA, NIGERIA

14. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Amina Abubakar Bello, Gynecologist /Obstetrician and Founder of RAiSE Foundation:
“She came in for a test, and then we found that it was pre-cancerous and then we treated her. And so in Veronica's story, you have a good ending. And this is the kind of ending we want others to have. And so we use people like her, you know, like Veronica, to show that this thing is not scary because one of the things, that, one of the problems that we have is some women are scared.”
15. Wide shot, RAiSE Foundation poster on the gate at the Foundation’s Screening Center
16. Wide shot, Screening Centre entrance
17. Close up, sign at Screening Center: “Cervical cancer screening & preventive therapy”
18. Various shots, a patient arrives at the screening room
19. Various shots, Dr. Bello with a patient in the counselling room
20. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Amina Abubakar Bello, Gynecologist / Obstetrician and Founder of RAiSE Foundation:
“I can't stand to see these women die needlessly. Especially when I know that it can be prevented. You know, that is the key thing for me here, that cervical cancer can be prevented. And so we need to do all that we can to make sure that our women don't get it.”
21. Wide shot, entrance to a hospital in Minna
22. Med shot, a health worker talking to a woman with her child at the hospital
23. Med shot, health worker prepares plate for a sample
24. Close up, health worker shows where Pap smear sample will be placed to test for cervical cancer
25. Wide Shot, health worker carrying out the screening
26. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Amina Abubakar Bello, Gynecologist / Obstetrician and Founder of RAiSE Foundation:
“We, first of all, advocate to increase the sensitisation and awareness of cervical cancer in the communities that we go to. We train the health workers at the primary health care facilities, which is the grassroots contact for the people, and we train them to train others so that we increase the number of health workers that have the capability and capacity to screen for cervical cancer. And lastly, we advocate to the government to bring up policies that will help with the eradication of cervical cancer, especially towards providing vaccines, providing screening to the health care system and also providing the treatments to be available for the people in the community.”

17 FEBRUARY 2021, MINNA, NIGERIA

27. Various shots, Veronica cleaning signs on the wall at the RAiSE Foundation office

STORYLINE:

Cervical cancer, which is caused by certain strains of the human papillomavirus (HPV), presents a significant public health threat to women on the African continent — all but one of the top 20 countries worldwide with the highest burden of cervical cancer in 2018 were in Africa.

Cervical cancer is curable if diagnosed and treated early. The tragedy is that while this type of cancer is preventable, poor access to prevention, screening and treatment contributes to 90% of deaths.

SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Amina Abubakar Bello, Gynecologist / Obstetrician and Founder of RAiSE Foundation:
“I can't stand to see these women die needlessly. Especially when I know that it can be prevented. You know, that is the key thing for me here, that cervical cancer can be prevented. And so we need to do all that we can to make sure that our women don't get it.”

To end needless suffering from a cancer that is both preventable and curable, 194 countries committed to WHO’s Global Strategy to Accelerate the Elimination of Cervical Cancer, launched in November 2020.

The strategy outlines three key steps: vaccination, screening and treatment. Reaching the targets outlined in the strategy would put the world on the path toward elimination of the disease within the century.

In Nigeria, organizations like RAiSE Foundation are working to improve cervical cancer prevention. RAiSE Foundation was established by Dr Amina Abubakar Bello, a gynecologist, obstetrician, and the first lady of Niger State.

SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Amina Abubakar Bello, Gynecologist / Obstetrician and Founder of RAiSE Foundation:
“We, first of all, advocate to increase the sensitisation and awareness of cervical cancer in the communities that we go to. We train the health workers at the primary health care facilities, which is the grassroots contact for the people, and we train them to train others so that we increase the number of health workers that have the capability and capacity to screen for cervical cancer. And lastly, we advocate to the government to bring up policies that will help with the eradication of cervical cancer, especially towards providing vaccines, providing screening to the health care system and also providing the treatments to be available for the people in the community.”

RAiSE offers financially accessible cervical cancer screenings, and any woman found with cancer or precancerous lesions is given free treatment.

SOUNDBITE (English) Veronica, recovered cervical cancer patient who was treated at RAiSE Foundation:
“To really come and screen is not easy. It's a bold step. I would encourage them to not be afraid. Come and screen yourself - it’s better than you being out there without screening. For women. Don't be scared. Just come. I know it is not easy, but come and do your screening to know whether there's something there or not. If there is something they will treat you immediately, they will take care of you.”

The Foundation aims to increase awareness about issues affecting the survival and growth of women and girls in Nigeria.

SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Amina Abubakar Bello, Gynecologist / Obstetrician and Founder of RAiSE Foundation:
“She came in for a test, and then we found that it was pre-cancerous and then we treated her. And so in Veronica's story, you have a good ending. And this is the kind of ending we want others to have. And so we use people like her, you know, like Veronica, to show that this thing is not scary because one of the things, that, one of the problems that we have is some women are scared.”

The elimination of cervical cancer is within the reach of all countries. Through widespread access to HPV vaccination, screening, and treatment, girls who are born today could live to see a world free of this disease.
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