IFAD / TONGA TRADITIONAL CANOE MAKING

Preview Language:   Original
28-Sep-2021 00:03:12
Young people in Tonga are learning the traditional craft of canoe making to create jobs, tackle obesity and protect their local fishing ecosystems. IFAD

Available Language: English
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Description
VIDEO NEWS RELEASE
STORY: IFAD / TONGA TRADITIONAL CANOE MAKING
TRT: 3:17
SOURCE: IFAD
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: TONGAN /ENGLISH /NATS

DATELINE: 14-20 SEPTEMBER 2021, EUA ISLAND, TONGA

SHOTLIST:

1.Various aerial shots, Eua island
2.Med shot, underwater, marine life off coast near to Eua
3.Various shots, elders and beneficiaries working with wood
4.SOUNDBITE (Tongan) Alipate Sailosi, Eua Community Member:
“People have to pay to go at sea on motorboats. But with the canoe, a good breakfast gives you enough energy to paddle through the day”
5.Med shot, motorboats moored in the Eua harbour
6.Various shots, fishermen unloading fish from boats
7.Wide shot, fisherman selling fish at market
8.Close up, fish packed in bags
9.Various shots, group of men carving out canoes
10.SOUNDBITE (Tongan) Okusi Lama, Young Eua Community Member:
“I learnt a lot of things during the training. I would like to encourage the youth to attend because this could be a way to make a living for them not only as fishermen but also as craftsmen.”
11.Med shot, group of men carving out canoes
12.Wide shot, fishermen going out in a canoe
13.SOUNDBITE (Tongan) Okusi Lama, Young Eua Community Member:
“With the canoes you can go out at sea and bring back fish for your family. Your family becomes healthy by eating from the ocean”
14.Aerial shot, coastline
15.SOUNDBITE (English) Tawfiq El-Zabri, Country Director, International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) in Tonga:
“Tonga also suffers from quite high [levels] of poor nutrition outcomes and non-communicable diseases such as obesity and a lot of that is related to access to nutritious food. There is limited land and it’s affected tby [water] salinity and climate change and increasing population and so the opportunity to go out and fish is very important.”
16.Various shots, underwater, fish over corals
17.SOUNDBITE (Tongan) Alipate Sailosi, Eua Community Member:
“These canoes help us achieve our goal which is to get enough fish for the whole island and to get it at a good price... We're slowly getting there.”
18.Med shot, men setting off in canoes
19.Pan right, men paddling in canoes

STORYLINE:

Young people in Tonga are learning the traditional craft of canoe making to create jobs, tackle obesity and protect their local fishing ecosystems.

In just over a month’s time, all eyes will be on Glasgow to see what steps world leaders will be taking to tackle climate change, but nine thousand miles away in the Pacific, young people on a Tongan island are returning to traditional crafts to help revive coral reefs and marine life in their local fishing waters.

The island of Eua in Tonga may look idyllic from the air, but on the ground, the local community are struggling to cope with high unemployment, spiralling obesity rates and climate change.

To try to tackle the problem some of the islanders are learning the traditional craft of canoe carving. Not only does it help the environment, but it also gives much needed employment to young islanders and gives them cheap and easy way to catch their own fish.

Small-scale fishing and selling locally is a key source of revenue for many Tongan households, but the increase in ocean temperatures and salinity levels, due to the changing climate, plus the proliferation of fishing motor boats in recent years has caused widespread damage to coral reefs.

As well as being much cheaper and easier to use, the canoes cause much less damage to the reefs, and are helping to increase marine biodiversity.

Canoe-carving lessons are led by the elders, who can pass down ttraditional knowledge.

SOUNDBITE (Tongan) Alipate Sailosi, Eua Community Member:
“People have to pay to go at sea on motorboats. But with the canoe, a good breakfast gives you enough energy to paddle through the day”

The courses are run by the MORDI Tonga Trust and are funded by the International Fund for Agricultural Development or IFAD and the Tongan Government. For unemployed young people like Okusi, they have given him much needed new skills.

SOUNDBITE (Tongan) Okusi Lama, Young Eua Community Member:
“I learnt a lot of things during the training. I would like to encourage the youth to attend because this could be a way to make a living for them not only as fishermen, but also as craftsmen.”

Fish are an important source of food and nutrition for Tongan communities and encouraging more young people to catch and eat their own fish will help tackle the countries huge obesity problem.

Tonga is one of the most obese countries in the world. At present over 90 percent of all Tongans are overweight.

SOUNDBITE (Tongan) Okusi Lama, Young Eua Community Member:
“With the canoes you can go out at sea and bring back fish for your family. Your family becomes healthy by eating from the ocean”

A rise in eating cheap processed imported food is at the heart of the problem, but the project leaders hope that by giving the young people the ability to make their own canoes, they are giving them the ability to access healthier food like fish and seafood.

SOUNDBITE (English) Tawfiq El-Zabri, Country Director, International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) in Tonga:
“Tonga also suffers from quite high [levels] of poor nutrition outcomes and non-communicable diseases such as obesity and a lot of that is related to access to nutritious food. There is limited land and it’s affected tby [water] salinity and climate change and increasing population and so the opportunity to go out and fish is very important.”

The project also aims to give food security and generate additional income for families living there.

SOUNDBITE (Tongan) Alipate Sailosi, Eua Community Member:
“These canoes help us achieve our goal which is to get enough fish for the whole island and to get it at a good price... We're slowly getting there.”
Series
Category
Geographic Subjects
Creator
IFAD
Alternate Title
unifeed210928f
Asset ID
2660554