UN / AFGHANISTAN GIRLS EDUCATION

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24-Sep-2021 00:04:28
Nobel Peace Prize laureate Malala Yousafzai said, “I was targeted for speaking out for girls education, and it proved to me that the Taliban was scared of the voice of women and girls. They did not want to hear women and girls speak out for equality, and they did not want to see women being educated.” UNIFEED

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STORY: UN / AFGHANISTAN GIRLS EDUCATION
TRT: 4:28
SOURCE: UNIFEED
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS
DATELINE: 24 SEPTEMBER 2021, NEW YORK CITY

SHOTLIST:

21 SEPTEMBER 2021, NEW YORK CITY

1.Wide shot, exterio, United Nations Headquarters

24 SEPTEMBER 2021, NEW YORK CITY

1.Wide shot, SDG Studio
2. SOUNDBITE (English) Malala Yousafzai, Co-founder and Board Chair of the Malala Fund:
“I was targeted for speaking out for girls education, and it proved to me that the Taliban was scared of the voice of women and girls. They did not want to hear women and girls speak out for equality, and they did not want to see women being educated. And I knew that my right to education is not only granted by the constitution of my country, by the Human Rights Convention and legislation and they are also by Islam. And when women are educated and they know that their rights are protected within their religion, within their community, within their country, they are empowered, they cannot be told to stay in the house and not going to school and not do a job.”
3. Wide shot, SDG Studio
4. SOUNDBITE (English) Malala Yousafzai, Co-founder and Board Chair of the Malala Fund:
“What needs to be done is that the international community must take this matter seriously. We cannot make compromises on the protection of women’s rights and on the protection of human dignity. This is a commitment that the UN has made, that they are there to work for the protection of human dignity of a human person, so now is the time that we stick to that commitment and to ensure that the rights of Afghanistan women are protected. One of the most important rights is the right to education. We know that education is a human right of all children. We also know that it improves our society and brings more peace and harmony. We also know that it has economic advantage, it uplift the society from poverty, it helps us with issues like climate change and the increase of conflict. And it helps us improve economy. So we are all in a better position when girls are educated, when women are empowered.”
5. Wide shot, SDG Studio
6. SOUNDBITE (English) Amina Mohammed, Deputy Secretary-General of the United Nations:
“But I think, as Malala said, beyond the conventions, beyond the constitutions which all guarantee educational rights of women, it is also in the region, for them to stand behind our religion, our Quran, which says that we need to seek the light.And I think we also need to remember that the Prophet peace and blessing be upon him, his wife Khadija was a very successful business woman. And if she was here today, she would probably be top ten in the world leading that business. And her husband, Prophet, peace and blessing be upon him, was a support. He furthered that business. And I think what we need to see is human beings in their dignity as partners, and to bring that argument to the Taliban that if you have your girls going to school and if you believe in all of these things, and you have to at least build on the environment that was created to build a better Afghanistan in which every Afghan has a right to that future, has a right to be part of the nation building.”
7. Wide shot, SDG Studio
8. SOUNDBITE (English) Amina Mohammed, Deputy Secretary-General of the United Nations:
“Every Taliban man has been born from a woman. They need to go back and remember that, to bring back that humanity to this whole discussion. And then we can get on with different ways where the international community can help shore up the economy, because if the economy fails, the other 18 million will be at risk. So saving life but also saving the livelihoods, and underpinning those livelihoods is education, is women’s rights. These are the discussions we can have with the Taliban to ensure that their recognition, of their coming back in to, as it was to say give Afghanistan a better future, this is what it means a better future, not a reversal of the past.”
9. Various shots, SDG studio
10. ⁣SOUNDBITE (English) Somaya Faruqi, Captain of the ‘Afghan Dreamers’ Robotics Team:
“Education means for me everything, because a country can improve by the new generation who are educated. Now my fear is that our country will be in [inaudible]. It is the moment of need, and it doesn’t advance education for every child. We cannot afford to waste any opportunity that way.”

11. Wide shot, SDG studio

STORYLINE:

Nobel Peace Prize laureate Malala Yousafzai said, “I was targeted for speaking out for girls education, and it proved to me that the Taliban was scared of the voice of women and girls. They did not want to hear women and girls speak out for equality, and they did not want to see women being educated.”

The event “Supporting a future for girls' education in Afghanistan” was held in New York today (24 Sep). It has a panel that centred the voices, knowledge and experience of Afghan educators and advocates in addressing what steps the international community must take in support of a future for Afghan girls' education.

Speaking at the event via a video link, Malala Yousafzai said, “I knew that my right to education is not only granted by the constitution of my country, by the Human Rights Convention and legislation and they are also by Islam. And when women are educated and they know that their rights are protected within their religion, within their community, within their country, they are empowered, they cannot be told to stay in the house and not going to school and not do a job.”

Malala also said, “what needs to be done is that the international community must take this matter seriously. We cannot make compromises on the protection of women’s rights and on the protection of human dignity. This is a commitment that the UN has made, that they are there to work for the protection of human dignity of a human person, so now is the time that we stick to that commitment and to ensure that the rights of Afghanistan women are protected.”

She continued, “one of the most important rights is the right to education. We know that education is a human right of all children. We also know that it improves our society and brings more peace and harmony. We also know that it has economic advantage, it uplift the society from poverty, it helps us with issues like climate change and the increase of conflict. And it helps us improve economy.”

Malala reiterated, “we are all in a better position when girls are educated, when women are empowered.”

UN Deputy Secretary-General Amina Mohammed echoed Malala, she said, “beyond the conventions, beyond the constitutions which all guarantee educational rights of women, it is also in the region, for them to stand behind our religion, our Quran, which says that we need to seek the light.”

She continued, “I think we also need to remember that the Prophet peace and blessing be upon him, his wife Khadija was a very successful business woman. And if she was here today, she would probably be top ten in the world leading that business. And her husband, Prophet, peace and blessing be upon him, was a support. He furthered that business.”

Mohammed added, “I think what we need to see is human beings in their dignity as partners, and to bring that argument to the Taliban that if you have your girls going to school and if you believe in all of these things, and you have to at least build on the environment that was created to build a better Afghanistan in which every Afghan has a right to that future, has a right to be part of the nation building.”

The Deputy Secretary-General also said, “every Taliban man has been born from a woman. They need to go back and remember that, to bring back that humanity to this whole discussion. And then we can get on with different ways where the intentional community can help shore up the economy, because if the economy fails, the other 18 million will be at risk.”

Mohammaed reiterated, “saving life but also saving the livelihoods, and underpinning those livelihoods is education, is women’s rights.”

She added, “these are the discussions we can have with the Taliban to ensure that their recognition, of their coming back in to, as it was to say give Afghanistan a better future, this is what it means a better future, not a reversal of the past.”

18-year-old Somaya is the captain of the ‘Afghan Dreamers’ robotics team, a group of 25 girls who built a robot for detecting landmines.

Also speaking at the event via a video link, Somaya said that education means everything for her, “because a country can improve by the new generation who are educated.”
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