GENEVA / AFGHAN FEMALE MAYOR

Preview Language:   Original
22-Sep-2021 00:02:54
Taliban can’t rule Afghanistan without women, said an Afghan political campaigner Zarifa Ghafari – a former mayor who fled Kabul last month – insisting that the Taliban must allow women to play a meaningful part in Afghanistan’s future. UNTV CH

Available Language: English
Type
Language
Format
Acquire
/
English
Other Formats
Description
STORY: GENEVA / AFGHAN FEMALE MAYOR
TRT: 2:54
SOURCE: UNTV CH
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH /NATS

DATELINE: 21 SEPTEMBER 2021, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND

SHOTLIST:

1. Exterior wide shot, United Nations flags flying.
2. Wide shot, Geneva Peace Talks in progress at UN Geneva, participants.
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Zarifa Ghafari, former mayor of Maidan Shar:
“Since 15 August, unfortunately, life is getting so hard for everyone: the financial situation, poverty, the level of violence, the level of poverty, the level of fear, the level of losses goes on and up always, day by day.”
4. Wide shot, Zarifa Ghafari delivering her speech to the Geneva Peace Talks audience.
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Zarifa Ghafari, former mayor of Maidan Shar:
“Qualifications in this new government is being part of jihad, being part of killing of people.”
6. Med shot, Zarifa Ghafari speaking and being filmed by a TV camera.
7. SOUNDBITE (English) Zarifa Ghafari, former mayor of Maidan Shar: “In Afghanistan, the biggest part of losses, the biggest victims of ongoing conflicts since more than 60 years is women always.”
8. Wide shot, Geneva Peace Talks, audience attending the Geneva Peace Week talks.
9. SOUNDBITE (English) Zarifa Ghafari, former mayor of Maidan Shar:
“We are not the women of 2001, we are not the women of the 90s; if they really want to govern and lead in Afghanistan, they are not able to govern without 50 per cent of Afghanistan which are women.”
10. Med shot, Zarifa Ghafari delivering her speech, TV camera in foreground.
11. SOUNDBITE (English) Zarifa Ghafari, former mayor of Maidan Shar:
“I don’t care, is there a Hazara, Uzbek, Pashtun or whatever, but there are no women, so this this cabinet, it’s not my cabinet.”
12. Close up, panel which reads “Peace Talks Geneva”.
13. SOUNDBITE (English) Zarifa Ghafari, former mayor of Maidan Shar:
“Taliban attacked me three times. They killed my dad, they destroyed my yesterday and my future, some amount of that. And they took all the hopes and everything that I had and the world that I made for myself.”
14. Med shot, Zarifa Ghafari speaking in front of audience.
15. SOUNDBITE (English) Zarifa Ghafari, former mayor of Maidan Shar:
“I want to talk to them on behalf of all women of Afghanistan who have been already paid a big amount of prices for the war or maybe for the peace. So now, they are just lost.”
16. Close up, participant filming event on his mobile phone.
17. SOUNDBITE (English) Zarifa Ghafari, former mayor of Maidan Shar:
“More than 50 per cent of teachers at school were women around the country but now, women are just forced to stay at home and more importantly, and so the worst part, is asking women, asking girls not to come to school and abandoning them from school.”
18. Wide shot, Zarifa Ghafari delivering her speech, shot from behind.
19. SOUNDBITE (English) Zarifa Ghafari, former mayor of Maidan Shar:
“For what do we have to pay? Why should I pay? Why am I paying? So I think these are the most important topics that we need to talk about it, and if they are ignoring it, they will have the same ignorance in Afghanistan that they are having right now.”
20. Wide shot, Zarifa Ghafari delivering her speech.
21. Med shot, Zarifa Ghafari delivering her speech, low-angle shot.
22. Med shot, one half of the Peace Talks sign, with Zarifa Ghafari to rear, participants applauding.

STORYLINE:

Taliban can’t rule Afghanistan without women, said an Afghan political campaigner Zarifa Ghafari – a former mayor who fled Kabul last month – insisting that the Taliban must allow women to play a meaningful part in Afghanistan’s future.

Speaking on the sidelines of the Geneva Peace Talks on Tuesday (21 Sep) at UN Geneva, where she was attending the NGO event as a keynote speaker in her personal capacity as an activist, Ghafari described how the situation has deteriorated in the country.

“Since 15 August, unfortunately, life is getting so hard for everyone: the financial situation, poverty, the level of violence, the level of poverty, the level of fear, the level of losses goes on and up always, day by day.”

Ghafari became the mayor of Maidan Shar, near Kabul, in 2018, at the age of 26. She survived attacks on her life by the Taliban, who murdered her father, she said. “Taliban attacked me three times. They killed my dad, they destroyed my yesterday and my future… And they took all the hopes and everything that I had and the world that I made for myself.”

Today, having fled abroad soon after the Taliban takeover, she remains determined to speak up on behalf of all Afghan women – noting that not a single one has been appointed to the new Afghan rulers’ cabinet.

“Qualifications in this new government is being part of jihad, being part of killing of people,” she maintained, adding that she didn’t care if there the Taliban appointees were “Hazara, Uzbek, Pashtun or whatever…there are no women, so this this cabinet, it’s not my cabinet”.

Volunteering herself for talks with the Taliban on behalf of all Afghan women, Ghafari said that women had been “the biggest victims of ongoing conflicts since more than 60 years”.

She added: “I want to talk to them on behalf of all women of Afghanistan who have been already paid a big amount of prices for the war or maybe for the peace. So now, they are just lost.”

A certain amount of progress on gender equality has happened in Afghanistan since the country’s new rulers were last in power, 20 years ago, Ghafari continued: “We are not the women of 2001, we are not the women of the 90s; if they really want to govern and lead in Afghanistan, they are not able to govern without 50 per cent of Afghanistan which are women.”

Nonetheless, the former mayor of Maidan Shar remains concerned about the future of girls and women whose education is under threat. “More than 50 per cent of teachers at school were women around the country,” she said. “But now, women are just forced to stay at home and more importantly, and so the worst part, is asking women, asking girls not to come to school and abandoning them from school.”

She added: “For what do we have to pay? Why should I pay? Why am I paying? So I think these are the most important topics that we need to talk about it, and if they are ignoring it, they will have the same ignorance in Afghanistan that they are having right now.”
Series
Category
Geographic Subjects
Creator
UNTV CH
Alternate Title
unifeed210922g
Asset ID
2656665