CAMEROON / REFUGEES GREEN WALL

Preview Language:   Original
22-Sep-2021 00:01:54
An ambitious reforestation project, carried out since 2018 by refugees and host communities in northern Cameroon, is contributing to the Great Green Wall, an African-led initiative that aims to grow an 8,000-kilometer continent-wide barrier to stop the ongoing desertification of the Sahel. UNHCR

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STORY: CAMEROON / REFUGEES GREEN WALL
TRT: 1:54
SOURCE: UNHCR
RESTRICTIONS: PLEASE CREDIT UNHCR ON SCREEN
LANGUAGE: FRENCH /HAUSSA /NATS

DATELINE: 30 JULY 2021, MINAWAO REFUGEE CAMP, CAMEROON

SHOTLIST:

1.Drone shot, children running around Minawao Camp
2.Drone shot, camp, all green
3.Drone shot, fenced house surrounded by trees
4.Wide shot, young children gathered around a cooking pot
5.Med shot, young child sitting by a cooking pot
6.SUONDBITE (Haussa) Lydia Youcoubou, refugee, member of the group managing the nursery:
“Minawao has become a place that is green all over and there are a lot of benefits to that. We have shade from the sun, the soil has improved and the trees attract water.”
7.Drone shot, plantation
8.Med shot, Lydia Yacoubou walks in the tree nursery with 2 others refugees
9.Med shot, Lydia Yacoubou walks in the tree nursery with 2 others refugees
10.Wide shot, Nigerian refugees at a camp
11.Med shot, refugees queueing for rations
12.Wide shot, refugees taking care of the plants
13.Wide shot, women in the nursery plantation
14.Med shot, woman who takes care of the nurseries
15.Drone shot, plantation
16.Drone shot, plantation with a street
17.Drone shot of the lake
18.Med shot, Lydia gives baby plants to children
19.Wide shot, refugees carrying bundles of wood on their heads
20.SOUNDBITE (French) Abdul Aziz, LWF Project Coordinator:
"We have not only focused our actions on reforestation and raising awareness. We are also overcoming challenges like cutting wood. We have set up a strategy with UNHCR to promote alternative energy sources like the use of eco-friendly briquettes.”
21.Wide shot, refugee women working with wood
22.Med shot, man who turns on a machine
23. Med shot, woman working with the machine
24.Close up, hand taking an eco-friendly briquette out of the machine
25.Med shot, women working with the briquettes
26.Close up, hand placing a charcoal in a fire
27.Drone shot, plantation and street
28.Med shot, kids walking away with baby plants in hands

STORYLINE:

Some 360,000 seedlings have been planted by refugees and host communities on more than a 100 hectares in and around the Minawao refugee camp in northern Cameroon. This ambitious reforestation project has been carried out since 2018 with spectacular results. It is part of the Great Green Wall, an African-led initiative that aims to grow an 8,000-kilometer continent-wide barrier to stop the ongoing desertification of the Sahel.

Located in the semi-desertic region of Far North region Cameroon, Minawao hosts nearly 70,000 refugees who have fled violence linked to the Boko Haram insurgency in neighbouring Nigeria since 2014. The region was already badly affected by climate change. The new arrivals have accelerated the desertification process, cutting down the few surrounding trees to support themselves.

In 2018, faced with this ecological and human tragedy, UNHCR and the Lutheran World Federation (LWF) launched a unique reforestation programme. The 'cocoon technology' developed by Land Life Company is both simple and efficient: burying a water tank that surrounds the plant roots and feeds it by capillary action, using a string that connects the tank to the young shoot.

The programme has been paid for by the Dutch Postcode Lottery, which donated €2,350,000 (US$2,765,000). It is part of the Great Green Wall, an African-led initiative that aims to grow an 8,000-kilometer continent-wide barrier to stop the ongoing desertification of the Sahel.
Seen from the sky, the evolution of the site in a few years is striking. A film made in 2018 showed vast stretches of sand surrounding buildings and shelters, now covered with vegetation (see video). But progress remains fragile. Refugees and locals still need fuel for cooking and heat.

To address this need, UNHCR and LWF are promoting alternative energy sources. Families in the camp can send their household waste to charcoal production centres where trained refugees turn it into coal they can use in specially adapted stoves.
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Category
Geographic Subjects
Creator
UNHCR
Alternate Title
unifeed210922b
Asset ID
2656443