UN / SYRIA HUMANITARIAN

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15-Sep-2021 00:03:05
UN humanitarian chief Martin Griffiths said that Syria is caught in “a downward spiral,” and the humanitarian needs are greater than they have ever been. UNIFEED

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STORY: UN / SYRIA HUMANITARIAN
TRT: 3:05
SOURCE: UNIFEED
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LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 15 SEPTEMBER 2021, NEW YORK CITY / FILE

SHOTLIST:

RECENT – NEW YORK CITY

1.Wide shot, exterior, United Nations Headquarters

15 SEPTEMBER 2021, NEW YORK CITY

2. Wide shot, Security Council
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Martin Griffiths, Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs and Emergency Relief Coordinator, United Nations:
“Syria is caught in a downward spiral. The country will continue to be a place of tragedy so long as the conflict continues. Need and suffering will continue to grow in the near term. I came away with a renewed commitment and conviction to identify, develop and invest in sustainable and effective ways to help. And I realize the complexity of that, and I realize the sensitivity of that. But this is what we owe, in this Council and in the countries that are represented here, this is what we owe to the people of Syria.”
4. Wide shot, Security Council
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Martin Griffiths, Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs and Emergency Relief Coordinator, United Nations:
“I spoke there with women, men, and children about the profound effects of more than ten years of conflict. Children asked for help to learn, to receive healthcare and for fuel to survive the upcoming winter. Women headed households spoke about the challenges that they have in finding income, almost all of them have no such income available, as well as for the family to survive.”
6. Wide shot, Security Council
7. SOUNDBITE (English) Martin Griffiths, Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs and Emergency Relief Coordinator, United Nations:
“People simply do not have clean water. And the lack of access to safe water is disproportionally affecting the general health and the reproductive health of women and girls. There is a human right for water which entitles everyone’s sufficient, safe, acceptable, accessible and affordable water.”
8. Wide shot, Security Council
9. SOUNDBITE (English) Martin Griffiths, Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs and Emergency Relief Coordinator, United Nations:
“Greater investment in resilience activities is an importance way, and a few ways to do just that. Put it in other way, failure to invest in resilience activities will of course, inevitably lead a greater humanitarian need and greater tension.”
10. Wide shot, Security Council
11. SOUNDBITE (English) Amany Qaddour, Regional Director, Syria Relief and Development:
“And similarity the exploitation of children, such as child recruitment, such as child labour. More recently, heavy manual labour in examples of construction and even mining for children as young as ten, there precarious working conditions pose enough risks for adults, let along children who have been stripped their ability to maintain a sense of normal and safe childhood, and also afford the rights to health development. We absolutely have seen increase in suicide, even among in young people and for children whose entire life are permeated by conflict. And the atmosphere is palpable with helplessness and despair.”
12. Wide shot, Security Council

STORYLINE:

UN humanitarian chief Martin Griffiths said that Syria is caught in “a downward spiral,” and the need and suffering will continue to grow in the near term. He said he “came away with a renewed commitment and conviction to identify, develop and invest in sustainable and effective ways to help”, but “this is what we owe, in this Council and in the countries that are represented here, this is what we owe to the people of Syria.”

Speaking to the Security Council today (15 Sep) via a video link, Griffiths described his recent visit to Syria, Lebanon and Turkey - first mission to the region in his new capacity.
He said that the visit offered opportunity for candid and constructive discussions, including in Damascus with Foreign Minister Faisal Mekdad and his Deputy, Bashar al-Jaafari, and in Ankara with Presidential Spokesman Kalın as well as the Deputy Foreign Minister there.

His primary conclusion from the visit is that humanitarian needs in Syria are greater than they have ever been.

During his trip, the UN humanitarian chief spoke with women, men and children about the profound effects of more than ten years of conflict. He said, “children asked for help to learn, to receive health care, and for fuel to survive the upcoming winter. Women-headed households spoke of the challenges they have in finding income, almost none of them having such income available, as well as for their families to survive.”
Griffiths also told the Council about the protracted water crisis that is affecting many parts of Syria. He explained, “people simply do not have clean water. And the lack of access to safe water is disproportionally impacting the general health and reproductive health of women and girls.

The humanitarian chief reiterated, “there is a human right to water, which entitles everyone to sufficient, safe, acceptable, accessible and affordable water.”

Griffiths also said that the communities he has met are determined to restart their lives, yet desperately need early recovery support to do so. Children want to learn, families want to prosper, and young adults want to work. They want support, as anywhere else in the world, to find their own dignified path to a better future.

He said, “greater investment in resilience activities is an important way – one of the few ways – to do just that. Put another way, failure to invest in resilience activities will, of course, inevitably lead to greater humanitarian need and greater tension.”

Amany Qaddour, Regional Director from Syria Relief and Development also briefed the Council. She told the Council members about the exploitation of children, such as child recruitment and child labour.

She said, “more recently, heavy manual labour in examples of construction and even mining for children as young as ten, there precarious working conditions pose enough risks for adults, let along children who have been stripped their ability to maintain a sense of normal and safe childhood, and also afford the rights to health development.”

Qaddour continued, “we absolutely have seen increase in suicide, even among in young people and for children whose entire life are permeated by conflict. And the atmosphere is palpable with helplessness and despair.”
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