UN / GUTERRES COMMON AGENDA

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10-Sep-2021 00:03:42
Launching his report on 'Our Common Agenda', UN chief António Guterres said, the world is “moving in the wrong direction,” and the choices we make now could “put us on a path towards breakdown and a future of perpetual crisis; or breakthrough to a greener and safer world.” UNIFEED

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STORY: UN / GUTERRES COMMON AGENDA
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SOURCE: UNIFEED
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LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / FRENCH / NATS

DATELINE: 10 SEPTEMBER 2021, NEW YORK CITY / FILE

SHOTLIST:

RECENT – NEW YORK CITY

1. Wide shot, exterior, United Nations

10 SEPTEMBER 2021, NEW YORK CITY

2. Wide shot, press briefing room
3. SOUNDBITE (English) António Guterres, Secretary-General, United Nations:
“We are moving in the wrong direction, and we are at a pivotal moment. The choices we make now could put us on a path towards breakdown and a future of perpetual crisis; or breakthrough to a greener and safer world.”
4. Wide shot, press briefing room
5. Wide shot, General Assembly Hall
3. SOUNDBITE (English) António Guterres, Secretary-General, United Nations:
“One message rang throughout our consultations: our world needs more, and better, multilateralism, based on deeper solidarity, to deal with the crises we face, and reverse today’s dangerous trends. There was broad recognition that we are at a pivotal moment. Business as usual could result in breakdown of the global order, into a world of perpetual crisis and winner-takes-all. Or we could decide to change course, heralding a breakthrough to a greener, better, safer future for all.”
4.Wide shot, General Assembly Hall
5. SOUNDBITE (English) António Guterres, Secretary-General, United Nations:
“We need an immediate global vaccination plan, implemented by an emergency Task Force made up of present and potential vaccine producers, the World Health Organization, ACT-Accelerator partners, and international financial institutions, to work with pharmaceutical companies to at least double vaccine production, and ensure that vaccines reach seventy percent of the world’s population in the first half of 2022.”
6. Wide shot, General Assembly Hall
7. SOUNDBITE (English) António Guterres, Secretary-General, United Nations:
“More broadly, we cannot afford to ignore the alarm sounded by the pandemic and by galloping climate change. We must launch a new era of bold, transformative policies across the board. We must take our heads out of the sand and face up to future health crises, financial shocks, and the triple planetary emergency of climate change, biodiversity loss and pollution. We need a quantum leap to strengthen multilateralism and make it fit for purpose.”
8. Wide shot, General Assembly Hall
9. SOUNDBITE (French) António Guterres, Secretary-General, United Nations:
« La coopération mondiale ne peut se construire que sur la solidarité au sein même des pays. C’est pourquoi je propose dans mon rapport une série de mesures visant à renouveler le contrat social entre l’État et les citoyens, ainsi qu’entre les citoyens eux-mêmes. Nous devons tirer sans tarder les enseignements de la pandémie de COVID-19 et nous employer à mettre en place une couverture sanitaire universelle et à offrir à toutes et à tous, partout, une éducation, un logement, un travail décent et une protection de leur revenu. »
“Global cooperation can only be built on solidarity within countries. This is why I propose in my report a series of measures aimed at renewing the social contract between the state and the citizens, as well as between the citizens themselves. We must learn the lessons of the COVID-19 pandemic without delay and strive to achieve universal health coverage and provide education, housing, decent work and protection for all, everywhere. returned.”
10. Wide shot, General Assembly Hall
11. SOUNDBITE (English) António Guterres, Secretary-General, United Nations:
“The United Nations is the only institution with universal convening power. Our Common Agenda must therefore include upgrading the United Nations. We need a UN 2.0 that can offer more relevant, systemwide, multilateral and multi-stakeholder solutions to the challenges of the 21st century. This transformation will be based on a quintet of cross-cutting issues: data; digital innovation; strategic foresight; behavioral science; and performance and results orientation.”
12. Wide shot, General Assembly Hall

STORYLINE:

Launching his report on 'Our Common Agenda,' UN chief António Guterres today (19 Sep) said, the world is “moving in the wrong direction,” and the choices we make now could “put us on a path towards breakdown and a future of perpetual crisis; or breakthrough to a greener and safer world.”

At a press conference in New York, Guterres briefed reporters on his vision for Our Common Agenda under four broad headings: strengthening global governance; focusing on the future; renewing the social contract; and ensuring a United Nations fit for a new era.

Earlier this morning, Guterres launched the report at a meeting of the General Assembly, prefacing his remarks with a scathing overview of the parlous state of a world he described as being under enormous stress, and warning that the world risks a future of “serious instability and climate chaos”.

The UN chief went on to describe the extensive consultations that fed into its development, a listening exercise that led the UN to the conclusion that enhanced multilateralism is seen as the way to deal with the world’s crises.

He said, “our world needs more, and better, multilateralism, based on deeper solidarity, to deal with the crises we face, and reverse today’s dangerous trends.”

Guterres noted that the international community is manifestly failing to protect its most precious global commons: the oceans, the atmosphere, outer space, and the pristine wilderness of Antarctica. Nor is it delivering policies to support peace, global health, the viability of the planet and other pressing needs.

He said that the lack of a global response and vaccination programme to end the COVID-19 pandemic is a clear and tragic example.

The UN chief said, “we need an immediate global vaccination plan, implemented by an emergency Task Force made up of present and potential vaccine producers, the World Health Organization, ACT-Accelerator partners, and international financial institutions, to work with pharmaceutical companies to at least double vaccine production, and ensure that vaccines reach seventy percent of the world’s population in the first half of 2022.”

More broadly, Guterres reiterated that the world cannot afford to ignore the alarm sounded by the pandemic and by galloping climate change.

He said, “we must launch a new era of bold, transformative policies across the board. We must take our heads out of the sand and face up to future health crises, financial shocks, and the triple planetary emergency of climate change, biodiversity loss and pollution.”

Guterres added, “we need a quantum leap to strengthen multilateralism and make it fit for purpose.”

The UN chief also said, “global cooperation can only be built on solidarity within countries,” explaining that this is why his report proses a series of measures aimed at “renewing the social contract between the state and the citizens, as well as between the citizens themselves.”

He continued, “we must learn the lessons of the COVID-19 pandemic without delay and strive to achieve universal health coverage and provide education, housing, decent work and protection for all, everywhere. returned.”

To ensure that we get to live in a world in which the breakthrough scenario dominates, the report makes a series of key proposals.

The importance of protecting vulnerable groups is recognized in commitments to gender equality and leaving no-one behind, which include reinforcing social protections and promoting gender parity.

Ensuring a more sustainable global economy is identified as a goal, with support for the poorest, and a fairer international trading system.

Climate action gets a special mention, with commitments to the goal of limiting warming to 1.5 degrees above pre-industrial levels, and net zero carbon emissions by 2050, and end to fossil fuel subsidies, a transformation of food systems, and a package of support for developing countries.

The perennial issues of peace and security are addressed, with the report calling for a “new agenda for peace”, involving more investment for peacebuilding, support for regional conflict prevention, a reduction of strategic risks such as nuclear weapons and cyberwarfare - and a dialogue on outer space to ensure that it is used peacefully and sustainably.

Linked to the security issue are commitments to international justice; the application of human rights online, as part of a Global Digital Compact, and a step up in the fight against corruption, in a bid to build trust in institutions.

One of those institutions is, of course, the UN itself, which, says the report, is due an upgrade, with a more participatory and consultative approach, gender parity by 2028, the re-establishment of the Secretary-General’s Scientific Advisory Board, and a policy that puts people at the centre of the UN System, taking into account age, gender and diversity.

Guterres said, “the United Nations is the only institution with universal convening power. Our Common Agenda must therefore include upgrading the United Nations. We need a UN 2.0 that can offer more relevant, systemwide, multilateral and multi-stakeholder solutions to the challenges of the 21st century.”

He added, “this transformation will be based on a quintet of cross-cutting issues: data; digital innovation; strategic foresight; behavioral science; and performance and results orientation.”

Other proposals concern the improved participation of youth in the political process and efforts to cut youth unemployment; better partnerships between governments, multilateral organizations, the private sector, and civil society; and an emergency platform to better prepare for global crises, with stronger global health security.

As the UN embarks on the Decade of Action – 10 years to make real progress to deliver the promise of a sustainable, fairer future by 2030 – there is an opportunity to reshape the world for the better, with multilateralism at the heart of the process.

However, as the “breakdown scenario” shows, failure to work effectively together risks significant, irreversible damage to the planet and even, life itself: In his speech to the General Assembly, Guterres underlined that Our Common Agenda is driven by solidarity, “the principle of working together, recognizing that we are bound to each other and that no community or country, however powerful, can solve its challenges alone.”
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