UN / YEMEN

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10-Sep-2021 00:02:56
The new Special Envoy for Yemen, Hans Grundberg, told the Security Council that the peace process in Yemen “has stalled for too long,” and called on the parties to the conflict “to engage in peaceful dialogue with one another under UN facilitation the terms of an overarching settlement, in good faith and without preconditions.” UNIFEED

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STORY: UN / YEMEN
TRT: 02:56
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LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / ARABIC / NATS

DATELINE: 10 SEPTEMBER 2021, NEW YORK CITY / FILE

SHOTLIST:

FILE – NEW YORK CITY

1. Wide shot, exterior United Nations Headquarters

10 SEPTEMBER 2021, NEW YORK CITY

2. Wide shot, Security Council
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Hans Grundberg, Special Envoy for Yemen, United Nations:
“The peace process has stalled for too long. The conflict parties have not discussed a comprehensive settlement since 2016. This has left Yemenis stuck in an indefinite state of war, with no clear way forward. It is therefore long overdue for the conflict parties to engage in peaceful dialogue with one another under UN facilitation the terms of an overarching settlement, in good faith and without preconditions.”
4. Med shot, Yemen Ambassador
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Hans Grundberg, Special Envoy for Yemen, United Nations:
“The freedom of movement of people and goods in and out as well as throughout the country should be guaranteed. Roads must be opened to allow people and goods to move in and out of Taiz. Sana’a airport needs to be open for commercial traffic. Restrictions on the import of fuel and goods through Hudaydah port must end. There is a continuous need for close coordination among all members of the UN family, the broader international community as well as parties to the conflict to appropriately address these issues.”
6. Wide shot, Council
7. SOUNDBITE (English) Ghada Eltahir Mudawi, Deputy Director of Operations, Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA):
“Conflict is raging across many parts of the country, especially in Marib, where fighting had again become particularly fierce. And as always, it is civilians who are paying the highest price. During Under-Secretary-General Griffiths last briefing to the Council, two-and-a-half weeks ago, he outlined the many ways in which the war in Yemen is compounding people’s suffering. We see it in the country’s crumbling economy. We see it the disintegration of essential services, and we see it in the faces of millions of men, women, and children who despite their extraordinary resilience, are being forced deeper into desperation.”
8. Wide shot, Council
9. SOUNDBITE (English) Abdullah al-Saadi, Permanent Representative to the United Nations, Yemen:
“The Yemeni government calls on the international community to provide generous support to government plans to ensure stability and economic recovery, and to provide development as well as humanitarian assistance. We call for building the capacity of state institutions to allow them to provide services, especially by creating a mechanism to challenge humanitarian donor funds through the Central Bank of Yemen to shore up the national currency and to improve the living conditions of citizensThe Yemeni government calls on the international community to provide generous support to government plans to ensure stability and economic recovery, and to provide development as well as humanitarian assistance. We call for building the capacity of state institutions to allow them to provide services, especially by creating a mechanism to challenge humanitarian donor funds through the Central Bank of Yemen to shore up the national currency and to improve the living conditions of citizens.”
10. Wide shot, Council

STORYLINE:

The new Special Envoy for Yemen, Hans Grundberg, today (10 Sep) told the Security Council that the peace process in Yemen “has stalled for too long,” and called on the parties to the conflict “to engage in peaceful dialogue with one another under UN facilitation the terms of an overarching settlement, in good faith and without preconditions.”

Grundberg noted that parties have not discussed a comprehensive settlement since 2016, which “has left Yemenis stuck in an indefinite state of war, with no clear way forward.”

The Special Envoy said, “the freedom of movement of people and goods in and out as well as throughout the country should be guaranteed. Roads must be opened to allow people and goods to move in and out of Taiz. Sana’a airport needs to be open for commercial traffic. Restrictions on the import of fuel and goods through Hudaydah port must end. There is a continuous need for close coordination among all members of the UN family, the broader international community as well as parties to the conflict to appropriately address these issues.”

Ghada Eltahir Mudawi, from the Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA), told the Council that “conflict is raging across many parts of the country, especially in Marib, where fighting had again become particularly fierce. And as always, it is civilians who are paying the highest price.”

Mudawi said, “we see it in the country’s crumbling economy. We see it the disintegration of essential services, and we see it in the faces of millions of men, women, and children who despite their extraordinary resilience, are being forced deeper into desperation.”

For his part, Yemeni Ambassador Abdullah al-Saadi said, “the Yemeni government calls on the international community to provide generous support to government plans to ensure stability and economic recovery, and to provide development as well as humanitarian assistance. We call for building the capacity of state institutions to allow them to provide services, especially by creating a mechanism to challenge humanitarian donor funds through the Central Bank of Yemen to shore up the national currency and to improve the living conditions of citizensThe Yemeni government calls on the international community to provide generous support to government plans to ensure stability and economic recovery, and to provide development as well as humanitarian assistance. We call for building the capacity of state institutions to allow them to provide services, especially by creating a mechanism to challenge humanitarian donor funds through the Central Bank of Yemen to shore up the national currency and to improve the living conditions of citizens.”

Secretary-General António Guterres appointed Grundberg of Sweden as his Special Envoy for Yemen in early August. Grundberg succeeds Martin Griffiths who has been appointed as Under Secretary General for Humanitarian Affairs and Emergency Relief Coordinator.
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