UN / MARITIME SECURITY

Preview Language:   Original
09-Aug-2021 00:02:40
The Secretary-General’s Chef de Cabinet, Maria Luiza Ribeiro Viotti, told the Security Council that “maritime security is being undermined at alarming levels.” UNIFEED

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STORY: UN / MARITIME SECURITY
TRT: 02:40
SOURCE: UNIFEED
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LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / CHINESE / NATS

DATELINE: 09 AUGUST 2021, NEW YORK CITY / FILE

SHOTLIST:

FILE – NEW YORK CITY

1. Wide shot, exterior United Nations Headquarters

09 AUGUST 2021, NEW YORK CITY

2. Multiple screens
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Maria Luiza Ribeiro Viotti, Chef de Cabinet of the Secretary-General:
“Maritime security is being undermined at alarming levels. From challenges around contested boundaries and navigation routes that do not conform to international law. To the depletion of natural resources — including illegal, unreported, and unregulated fishing. To armed attacks and crimes at sea, such as piracy, robbery, and terrorist acts, as well as use of limpet mines and drones.”
4. Multiple screens
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Ghada Fathi Waly, Executive Director, United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime:
“All countries, coastal and landlocked, rely on the security of the world’s oceans. Freedom of navigation, confirmed by the UN Convention on the Law the Sea, is recognized as a fundamental principle of international law. This time-honoured freedom has come increasingly under threat.”
6. Multiple screens
7. SOUNDBITE (English) Ghada Fathi Waly, Executive Director, United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime:
“The challenges to maritime security continue to grow and our responses must keep up. To secure our seas we need greater concerted international efforts to target challenges and to reduce vulnerabilities. Conflict in the South China Sea or in any ocean would have serious global consequences for security and for commerce.”
8. Multiple screens
9. SOUNDBITE (English) Antony John Blinken, Secretary of State, United States:
“Some may assert that resolving the dispute in the South China Sea is not the business of the United States. Or any other country that is not a claimant to the islands and waters. But it is the business, even more, the responsibility of every member state to defend the rules that we all agreed to follow and peacefully resolve maritime disputes. What’s more, when a state faces no consequences for ignoring these rules, it fuels greater impunity and instability everywhere.”
10. Multiple screens
11. SOUNDBITE (Chinese) Dai Bing, Chargé D'affaires, China:
“The United States is not qualified to make irresponsible remarks on the issue of the South China Sea. The United States has been stirring up trouble out of nothing, arbitrarily sending advanced military vessels and aircraft into the South China Sea as provocation, and publicly trying to drive a wedge into regional countries, especially countries concerned. This county itself has become the biggest threat to peace and stability in the South China Sea. The US itself does not join the UNCLOS but considers itself a judge of the convention pointing fingers at other countries and interfering arbitrarily. It has no credibility on maritime issues.”
12. Multiple screens

STORYLINE:

The Secretary-General’s Chef de Cabinet, Maria Luiza Ribeiro Viotti, today (9 Aug) told the Security Council that “maritime security is being undermined at alarming levels.”

Ribeiro Viotti said these challenges include contested boundaries and navigation routes that do not conform to international law, depletion of natural resources, including illegal, unreported, and unregulated fishing, armed attacks and crimes at sea, including piracy, robbery, and terrorist acts, and the use of limpet mines and drones.

For her part, the Executive Director of the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC), Ghada Fathi Waly, said, “all countries, coastal and landlocked, rely on the security of the world’s oceans. Freedom of navigation, confirmed by the UN Convention on the Law the Sea, is recognized as a fundamental principle of international law. This time-honoured freedom has come increasingly under threat.”

Fathi Waly said, “the challenges to maritime security continue to grow and our responses must keep up. To secure our seas we need greater concerted international efforts to target challenges and to reduce vulnerabilities. Conflict in the South China Sea or in any ocean would have serious global consequences for security and for commerce.”

The Secretary of State of the United States Antony John Blinken said, “some may assert that resolving the dispute in the South China Sea is not the business of the United States. Or any other country that is not a claimant to the islands and waters. But it is the business, even more, the responsibility of every member state to defend the rules that we all agreed to follow and peacefully resolve maritime disputes. What’s more, when a state faces no consequences for ignoring these rules, it fuels greater impunity and instability everywhere.”

Chinese Ambassador Dai Bing responded that “the United States is not qualified to make irresponsible remarks on the issue of the South China Sea.”

He said, “the United States has been stirring up trouble out of nothing, arbitrarily sending advanced military vessels and aircraft into the South China Sea as provocation, and publicly trying to drive a wedge into regional countries, especially countries concerned. This county itself has become the biggest threat to peace and stability in the South China Sea. The US itself does not join the UNCLOS but considers itself a judge of the convention pointing fingers at other countries and interfering arbitrarily. It has no credibility on maritime issues.”

Today’s virtual meeting, under the Indian presidency of the Council, aimed to provide an opportunity to discuss the measures to be taken by the United Nations and Member States to evolve a framework which would enhance their coordination in responding to non-traditional maritime security threats as well as unprecedented maritime situations, and the ways in which they can individually and jointly better respect their humanitarian commitments with regard to difficulties at sea.
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