IFAD / FOOD SYSTEMS ADVANCER

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23-Jul-2021 00:03:05
“If we ignore the challenges and needs of rural people in the world’s poorest countries, our attempts to create more equitable and sustainable food systems are doomed to fail,” said the President of the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) ahead of the UN Food Systems Pre-Summit that begins in Rome on Monday. IFAD

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STORY: IFAD / FOOD SYSTEMS ADVANCER
TRT: 3:05
SOURCE: IFAD
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH /URDU /NATS

DATELINE: 22 JULY 2021, ROME ITALY/ JUNE 2021, BAHAWALPUR, PAKISTAN /FILE

SHOTLIST:

JUNE 2021, BAHAWALPUR, PAKISTAN

1.Various shots, Shabana Bibi – farmer, getting food from foodbank
2.SOUNDBITE (Urdu) Shabana Bibi, farmer :
3.“Everything is difficult, but we have no other choice than hard work to raise children.”
4.Various shots, rural areas of Bahawalpur
5.SOUNDBITE (Urdu) Shabana Bibi, farmer:
“At times we get sick, but we have no choice except to continue work. As we work under the sun, we get sick and during winters and while cotton picking we get flu and cough.”

FILE - 2020, MEKONG DELTA, VIETNAM

6.Various shots, farmers in paddy fields

FILE – 2020, EL SALVADOR

7.Tracking shot, farmer walking

FILE – 2020, TUNISIA

8.Various shots, farmer with her camels

FILE - JUNE 2021, UGANDA

9.Pan right, farmer walking through the chicken coop

22 JULY 2021, ROME ITALY

10.Wide shot, IFAD Headquarters
11.Close up, UN flag
12.SOUNDBITE (English) Gilbert Houngbo, President, International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD):
“If we ignore the challenges and needs of rural people in the world’s poorest countries, our attempts to create more equitable and sustainable food systems are doomed to fail. Let’s be frank”
13.Close up, IFAD logo
14.SOUNDBITE (English) Gilbert Houngbo, President, International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD):
“If you want to fix food systems, listen to the people who work in them. Rural small-scale farmers produce about a third of our global food, but too often they receive a pittance for their efforts and are left vulnerable to shocks.”

JUNE 2021, BAHAWALPUR, PAKISTAN

15.Tracking shot, Bibi picking up a sack at food bank
16.SOUNDBITE (Urdu) Shabana Bibi, farmer:
“I want to request world leaders to control the prices of food items. I request world leader to please eliminate poverty”
17.Tracking shot, Bibi leaving with sack on her head

STORYLINE:

“If we ignore the challenges and needs of rural people in the world’s poorest countries, our attempts to create more equitable and sustainable food systems are doomed to fail,” said the President of the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) ahead of the UN Food Systems Pre-Summit that begins in Rome on Monday (26 Jul).

At the Food Systems Pre-Summit (26-28 July), IFAD will join thousands of governments, companies, development agencies, farmers and civil society organisations to discuss ways to transform how we grow, process, sell and consume food to make it more sustainable and equitable. The pre-Summit aims to establish a common vision, launch commitments and mobilize financing and partnerships.

35-year-old Shabana Bibi finds it hard to earn a living harvesting wheat and picking cotton in Bahawalpur in Pakistan. She also takes in sewing to help pay the bills, but often the money she earns is still not enough and her children go hungry, so she has to turn to a food bank to feed her children.

SOUNDBITE (Urdu) Shabana Bibi, farmer:
“Everything is difficult but we have no other choice than hard work to raise children.”

The changing climate in Pakistan has seen an increase in weather extremes, in summer temperatures now regularly reach 50 °C, in winter it can drop to below freezing.

“At times we get sick, but we have no choice except to continue work. As we work under the sun, we get sick and during winters and while cotton picking we get flu and cough,” Bibi said.

Rural small-scale farmers like Shabana help produce at least a third of global food and supply up to 80 per cent of food in parts of Africa and Asia but are often ignored, despite playing a major role in keeping food systems functioning, they themselves go hungry.

Last year, this was exacerbated by climate change, conflict, and the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic, resulting in a dramatic increase in global hunger, according to a report released by IFAD and other UN agencies last week. One in ten people now go hungry.

Ahead of the Food Systems Pre-Summit next week Gilbert Houngbo, President of the UN’s International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) is calling on policymakers to ignore rural farmers like Shabana at their peril.

SOUNDBITE (English) Gilbert Houngbo, President, International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD):
“If we ignore the challenges and needs of rural people in the world’s poorest countries, our attempts to create more equitable and sustainable food systems are doomed to fail. Let’s be frank”

IFAD is making sure rural farmers and producers will be heard. The Rural Voices platform is giving rural producers like Shabana a chance to share their worries and concerns to a much wider audience.

SOUNDBITE (English) Gilbert Houngbo, President, International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD):
“If you want to fix food systems, listen to the people who work in them. Rural small-scale farmers produce about a third of our global food, but too often they receive a pittance for their efforts and are left vulnerable to shocks.”

Shabana and her family hope her voice will be heard by leaders attending the summit.

SOUNDBITE (Urdu) Shabana Bibi, farmer:
“We cannot afford diverse food for our children due to financial constraints. We need financial assistance schemes like loans, so we could afford wheat grains.”

IFAD will join thousands of governments, companies, development agencies, farmers and civil society organisations at the Pre-Summit to discuss ways to transform how we grow, process, sell and consume food to make it more sustainable and equitable.

IFAD is calling for a number of key changes to food systems, including:

To commit financing and political will to ensure rural people can access the inputs, markets, financial services, technology and information they need to grow their businesses, adapt to climate change, protect the environment and biodiversity, and be more resilient to economic, health and weather shocks.
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