OHCHR / PHILONISE FLOYD

Preview Language:   Original
28-Jun-2021 00:01:01
"The pain that I went through, it was horrific because it was like a motion cinema picture watching my brother passed away," Philonise Floyd, brother of murdered George Floyd said in an interview with the OHCHR. “It's difficult knowing that you can run from the police and they still will shoot you in the back," he added. OHCHR

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STORY: OHCHR / PHILONISE FLOYD
TRT: 1:01
SOURCE: OHCHR
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH/NATS

DATELINE: 28 JUNE 2021 GENEVA, SWITZERLAND.

SHOTLIST:

FILE

1.Aerial shot, Palais Wilson

28 JUNE 2021 GENEVA, SWITZERLAND

2.SOUNDBITE (English): Philonise Floyd, brother of George Floyd:
“And the pain that I went through, it was horrific because it was like a motion cinema picture watching my brother passed away. He was tortured to death and I'm talking about in broad daylight, this was a modern-day execution and it was a lynching that shouldn't have never happened.”

FILE

3.Aerial shot, Palais Wilson

28 JUNE 2021 GENEVA, SWITZERLAND


4.SOUNDBITE (English) Philonise Floyd, brother of George Floyd:
“We live in this place where it's supposed to be the land of the free. But if people are dying because they looked at their cell phones and people thinking it's a gun, or you're dying because people just scared of you, it's a problem.”

FILE

5.Aerial shot, Palais Wilson

28 JUNE 2021 GENEVA, SWITZERLAND


6.SOUNDBITE (English) Philonise Floyd, brother of George Floyd:
“It's difficult knowing that you can run from the police and they still will shoot you in the back where no weapon you don't have any weapon. But at the same time, they still get qualified immunity.”

FILE

7.Aerial shot, Palais Wilson


STORYLINE:

The UN Human Rights Office was mandated in June 2020 by Human Rights Council resolution 43/1 – in the wake of the murder of George Floyd in the United States – to produce a comprehensive report on systemic racism, violations of international human rights law against Africans and people of African descent by law enforcement agencies, government responses to anti-racism peaceful protests, as well as accountability and redress for victims.

The analysis carried out by the Office is based on online consultations with over 340 individuals, mostly of African descent; over 110 written contributions, including with States; on a review of publicly available material; and on additional consultations with relevant experts.

Interviewed by the OHCHR for this occasion, Philonise Floyd, brother of murdered George Floyd said “the pain that I went through, it was horrific because it was like a motion cinema picture watching my brother passed away. He was tortured to death and I'm talking about in broad daylight, this was a modern-day execution and it was a lynching that shouldn't have never happened.”

“We live in this place where it's supposed to be the land of the free. But if people are dying because they looked at their cell phones and people thinking it's a gun, or you're dying because people just scared of you, it's a problem,” Philonise Floyd said. “It's difficult knowing that you can run from the police and they still will shoot you in the back where no weapon you don't have any weapon. But at the same time, they still get qualified immunity.”

The High Commissioner’s analysis of 190 deaths demonstrated that law enforcement officers are rarely held accountable for human rights violations and crimes against people of African descent, due in part to deficient investigations, a lack of independent and robust oversight and complaint and accountability mechanisms, and a widespread “presumption of guilt” against people of African descent. With rare exceptions, investigations, prosecutions, trials and judicial decisions fail to consider the role that racial discrimination, stereotypes and institutional bias may have played in the deaths. Seven illustrative cases were particularly closely examined: Luana Barbosa dos Reis Santos and João Pedro Matos Pinto (Brazil); George Floyd and Breonna Taylor (United States); Kevin Clarke (United Kingdom); Janner (Hanner) García Palomino (Colombia) and Adama Traoré (France).
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