UN / INDIGENOUS PEOPLES FOOD SYSTEMS

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25-Jun-2021 00:01:53
Briefing reporters during the virtual launch of the Food and Agriculture Organization’s (FAO’s) Indigenous Peoples’ Food Systems Report, the FAO’s Indigenous People’s Unit Chief, Yon Fernández de Larrinoa, said, “indigenous peoples food systems are disappearing at an alarming rate, resulting from displacement, violence, climate change, extractive industries, and intensive agricultural livestock,” and “unless new policies are put in place to support them, they will be a major loss for humankind in the next years.” UNIFEED

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STORY: UN / INDIGENOUS PEOPLES FOOD SYSTEMS
TRT: 01:53
SOURCE: UNIFEED
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LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 25 JUNE 2021, NEW YORK CITY / FILE

SHOTLIST:

RECENT – NEW YORK CITY

1. Wide shot, exterior, United Nations Headquarters

25 JUNE 2021, NEW YORK CITY

2. Multiple screens
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Yon Fernández de Larrinoa, Chief, Indigenous People’s Unit, Food and Agriculture Organization’s (FAO):
“Indigenous peoples food systems are disappearing at an alarming rate, resulting from displacement, violence, climate change, extractive industries, and intensive agricultural livestock. Unless new policies are put in place to support them, they will be a major loss for humankind in the next years.”
4. Multiple screens
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Yon Fernández de Larrinoa, Chief, Indigenous People’s Unit, Food and Agriculture Organization’s (FAO):
“We cannot combat climate change and protect biodiversity without indigenous people’s food systems. Indigenous peoples protect 80 percent of the remaining biodiversity in the world, and we will not achieve SDG 2 unless we understand better indigenous peoples’ food systems and support them with tailored policies and programmes.”
6. Multiple screens
7. SOUNDBITE (English) Yon Fernández de Larrinoa, Chief, Indigenous People’s Unit, Food and Agriculture Organization’s (FAO):
“Indigenous peoples food systems are probably the most revolutionary food systems that we have around the world today. The level of understanding by scientists, the level of understanding by policy-makers is very low, and it is a pity that we are trying to reinvent the wheel and make other food systems sustainable and resilient when indigenous people have proved for thousands of years that theirs are.”
8. Multiple screens
9. SOUNDBITE (English) Ann Nuorgam, Chair, UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues:
“This publication clearly demonstrates how the rights of indigenous peoples over their lands and territories is crucial, not only for their own survival, and, as the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change noted, agricultural practices that include indigenous and local knowledge and can contribute to overcoming combined challenges of climate change, food security, biodiversity conservation, and combatting desertification and land degradation.”
10. Multiple screens

STORYLINE:

Briefing reporters during the virtual launch of the Food and Agriculture Organization’s (FAO’s) Indigenous Peoples’ Food Systems Report, the FAO’s Indigenous People’s Unit Chief, Yon Fernández de Larrinoa, today (25 Jun) said, “indigenous peoples food systems are disappearing at an alarming rate, resulting from displacement, violence, climate change, extractive industries, and intensive agricultural livestock,” and “unless new policies are put in place to support them, they will be a major loss for humankind in the next years.”

Fernández de Larrinoa said, “we cannot combat climate change and protect biodiversity without indigenous people’s food systems,” noting that “indigenous peoples protect 80 percent of the remaining biodiversity in the world.”

He said the world will not achieve the Sustainable Development Goal number 2 (SDG 2) of Zero Hunger, “unless we understand better indigenous peoples’ food systems and support them with tailored policies and programmes.”

The FAO official said, “indigenous peoples food systems are probably the most revolutionary food systems that we have around the world today. The level of understanding by scientists, the level of understanding by policy-makers is very low, and it is a pity that we are trying to reinvent the wheel and make other food systems sustainable and resilient when indigenous people have proved for thousands of years that theirs are.”

Also briefing reporters, the Chair of the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues, Ann Nuorgam, said the Report “demonstrates how the rights of indigenous peoples over their lands and territories is crucial, not only for their own survival,” but “agricultural practices that include indigenous and local knowledge and can contribute to overcoming combined challenges of climate change, food security, biodiversity conservation, and combatting desertification and land degradation.”

The collaborative study, titled Indigenous Peoples' Food System, Insights of Sustainability and Resilience from the Front Line of Climate Change, was produced by the FAO together with the Alliance of Biodiversity International and The International Centre for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT), and looks at eight Indigenous Peoples’ food systems in Amazon, Sahel, Himalayas, Pacific Islands and Arctic, documenting unique capacity to conserve biodiversity and foster resilient food security and calls for recognizing land rights, and traditional practices.
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UNIFEED
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unifeed210625d
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2636831