ILO / CHILD LABOUR

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09-Jun-2021 00:04:02
The number of children in child labour has risen to 160 million worldwide – an increase of 8.4 million children in the last four years – with millions more at risk due to the impacts of COVID-19, according to a new report by the International Labour Organization (ILO) and UNICEF. ILO

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STORY: ILO / CHILD LABOUR
TRT: 4:02
SOURCE: ILO
RESTRICTIONS: PLEASE CREDIT UNICEF FOOTAGE / EMBARGO TILL THURSDAY 10 JUNE, 00:01 GMT]
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 09 JUNE 2021, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND / FILE

SHOTLIST:

FILE – ILO - SEPTEMBER 2014, PHILIPPINES

1. Various shots, children scavenging in waste dump

09 JUNE 2021, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND

2.SOUNDBITE (English) Henrietta H. Fore, UNICEF Executive Director:
“We are losing ground in the fight to end child labour. Even before the COVID-19 pandemic, we saw the first increase in two decades. 8.4 million more children engaged in child labour since 2016. And now, under COVID-19, an additional 9 million children are at risk of being pushed into child labour by the end of next year. They are affected by school closures, lockdowns, lost parental jobs and income, a lack of social safety nets.” “Families are desperate and they are turning to child labour as a last resort. We must not accept this. We urge countries to expand income support measures like child benefits to get children back into school where they belong, and to invest in programmes which protect and prevent them from being exploited. It’s time to get back on track.”

FILE – ILO - NOVEMBER 2013, PHILIPPINES

3. Wide shot, charcoal making in slum outside Manila.
4. Various shots, boy packing charcoal into bags.

09 JUNE 2021, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND

5. SOUNDBITE (English) Guy Ryder, ILO Director-General:
“The danger is, and with the pandemic and everything it’s done to the world of work, and we know what it’s done; it’s destroyed a lot of jobs, it’s reduced labour income, and it’s thrown a lot of people into poverty and extreme vulnerability. We estimate that the pandemic has put 108 million people and their families into working poverty. Well in those circumstances the danger is that people have to resort to child labour almost as a survival strategy. And our estimations show that unless we act to stop it we could see a further increase until the end of 2022 of some 9 million in child labour. This would take us further in the wrong direction. But it’s not inevitable if we do the right things, if we invest in the fight against child labour, invest in social protection and income support, we can stop that from happening and get back on track to where we want to get to.”

FILE – ILO – MARCH 2013, MALAWI

6. Various shots, children farming tobacco
7. Various shots, boys digging ditch

FILE – UNICEF – MAY 2021, DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF THE CONGO

8.Various shots, boys digging in deep mine

STORYLINE:

The number of children in child labour has risen to 160 million worldwide – an increase of 8.4 million children in the last four years – with millions more at risk due to the impacts of COVID-19, according to a new report by the International Labour Organization (ILO) and UNICEF.

Child Labour: Global estimates 2020, trends and the road forward - released ahead of World Day Against Child Labour on 12th June – warns that progress to end child labour has stalled for the first time in 20 years, reversing the previous downward trend that saw child labour fall by 94 million between 2000 and 2016. The report points to a significant rise in the number of children aged 5 to 11 years in child labour, who now account for just over half of the total global figure. The number of children aged 5 to 17 years in hazardous work – defined as work that is likely to harm their health, safety or morals – has risen by 6.5 million to 79 million since 2016.

SOUNDBITE (English) Henrietta H. Fore, UNICEF Executive Director:
“We are losing ground in the fight to end child labour. Even before the COVID-19 pandemic, we saw the first increase in two decades. 8.4 million more children engaged in child labour since 2016. And now, under COVID-19, an additional 9 million children are at risk of being pushed into child labour by the end of next year. They are affected by school closures, lockdowns, lost parental jobs and income, a lack of social safety nets.” “Families are desperate and they are turning to child labour as a last resort. We must not accept this. We urge countries to expand income support measures like child benefits to get children back into school where they belong, and to invest in programmes which protect and prevent them from being exploited. It’s time to get back on track.”

SOUNDBITE (English) Guy Ryder, ILO Director-General:
“The danger is, and with the pandemic and everything it’s done to the world of work, and we know what it’s done; it’s destroyed a lot of jobs, it’s reduced labour income, and it’s thrown a lot of people into poverty and extreme vulnerability. We estimate that the pandemic has put 108 million people and their families into working poverty. Well in those circumstances the danger is that people have to resort to child labour almost as a survival strategy. And our estimations show that unless we act to stop it we could see a further increase until the end of 2022 of some 9 million in child labour. This would take us further in the wrong direction. But it’s not inevitable if we do the right things, if we invest in the fight against child labour, invest in social protection and income support, we can stop that from happening and get back on track to where we want to get to.”
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