BANGLADESH / ROHINGYA REFUGEE FARMERS

Preview Language:   Original
18-May-2021 00:05:05
In one of Bangladesh’s poorest districts, which hosts some 900,000 Rohingya refugees, UNHCR is offering support to local farmers who often struggle to make ends meet, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic. UNHCR

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STORY: BANGLADESH / ROHINGYA REFUGEE FARMERS
TRT: 5:05
SOURCE: UNHCR
RESTRICTIONS: PLEASE CREDIT UNHCR ON SCREEN
LANGAUGE: CHAKMA / NATS

DATELINE: 10 FEBRUARY 2021, HORIKHOLA AND TEKNAF, BANGLADESH

SHOTLIST:

10 FEBRUARY 2021, TEKNAF, BANGLADESH

1. Med shot, Mathana picking vegetables in her garden
2. Wide shot, Mathana picking vegetables in her garden
3. SOUNDBITE (Chakma) Mathana Chakma, Farmer:
“My name is Mathana Chakma. There are five people in my family: my father, three younger brothers and a sister, and myself. We had to work extremely hard to make a living, even before the Rohingya people came.”
4. Wide shot, Mathana filling up a watering can
5. Med shot, Mathana watering her garden
6. Close up, watering can
7. Wide shot, Mathana watering her garden

12 FEBRUARY 2021, TEKNAF, BANGLADESH

8. Close up, sun glares through leaves
9. Close up, straw basket picked up
10. Med shot, Mathana walking to the market, carrying her straw basket
11. Med shot, Mathana walking to the market, carrying her straw basket
12. Med shot, Mathana arriving at the market
13. Med shot, locals at the market
14. SOUNDBITE (English) Shoila Chakma, CNRS:
“This village has a local community of about 100 families. Before there was no market in this village so they had to go far to sell, to Shaplapur and Whykong. They couldn’t even cover their transportation costs by selling only one or two kilogrammes of vegetables.”
15. Wide shot, vegetable hanging in garden
16. Med shot, straw basket filled with vegetables
17. Med shot, Mathana talking to client, smiling
18. Med shot, Mathana Emptying her vegetables basket for display
19. Med shot, Mathana Emptying her vegetables basket for display
20. Med shot, other farmer selling their vegetables
21. Med shot, Mathana talking to client, selling her vegetables, collecting money
22. Med shot, farmer coming to the market with a basket full of vegetables on her head

10 FEBRUARY 2021, TEKNAF, BANGLADESH

23. SOUNDBITE (English) Subrata Kumar Chakrabarty, UNHCR Livelihoods Officer:
“It has a positive impact since they don’t need to pay the transportation cost. Moreover, they have a bargaining capacity to increase the price which is positively impacting their food security.”

8 FEBRUARY 2021, UKHIYA, BANGLADESH

24. Med shot, local farmer picking vegetables from a tree
25. Med shot, Kefayetullah and his wife working on their homestead garden
26. Close up, Green tomato being sliced in half
27. Med shot, Kefayetullah and his wife working on their homestead garden

12 FEBRUARY 2021, TEKNAF, BANGLADESH

28. Wide shot, Mathana walking to the market, carrying her straw basket
29. Med shot, Mathana and her father at home

10 FEBRUARY 2021, TEKNAF, BANGLADESH

30. Wide shot, Mathana watering her garden
31. SOUNDBITE (Chakma) Mathana Chakma, Farmer:
“In the future I hope to get a job, I want to stand on my own feet. I am not worried about what happened in the past. I left it all in the past. I don’t want a big house. I just want a beautiful, happy family with my siblings, and that is my future.”
32. Wide shot, Mathana walking through her garden
33. Med shot, Mathana picking up vegetables in her garden
34. Wide shot, Mathana walking along side a pond
35. Med shot, Mathana arriving home, dropping her vegetable basket
36. Close up, wood fire boiling pot
37. Med shot, Mathana in her home, looking at the fire

STORYLINE:

In one of Bangladesh’s poorest districts, which hosts some 900,000 Rohingya refugees, UNHCR is offering support to local farmers who often struggle to make ends meet, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Prior to the Rohingya refugee influx in 2017, Cox’s Bazar district was already an underdeveloped district in Bangladesh. The influx of more than 740,000 refugees has further impacted the lives of local communities. The local community were the first responders when the Rohingya arrived with nothing, however, the continued presence of the refugees has impacted the livelihoods of many local Bangladeshis. The COVID-19 pandemic resulted in serious economic hardship and food security implications for the already vulnerable local population, putting many at risk of food insecurity.

New programmes, such as vegetable collection centres have been introduced recently to support local populations to sell their produce at a fair price. Vegetable collection centres are also located close to the producers, reducing transportation costs. This has significantly increased their earning capacity, encouraging more people to engage in agriculture.

Mathana is one of the farmers benefiting from a local collection centre created by UNHCR and its local aid partner CNRS. Her future is taking root in these fields in Bangladesh’s Cox’s Bazar district.

SOUNDBITE (Chakma) Mathana Chakma, Farmer:
“My name is Mathana Chakma. There are five people in my family: my father, three younger brothers and a sister, and myself. We had to work extremely hard to make a living, even before the Rohingya people came.”

Mathana was briefly married at 16, then widowed, and returned to live with her father and four younger siblings. She supports the whole family with the sale of her crops, which includ okra, long beans, green chilies, cabbage and other leafy vegetables. Mathana has received three or four trainings on animal husbandry and on improving bedding techniques for plants. She also received seeds, fertiilizer, as well as a goat and hens, and last year UNHCR gave her an emergency cash grant as part of a COVID-19 assistance effort, which she has used to expand her livestock.

SOUNDBITE (English) Shoila Chakma, CNRS:
“This village has a local community of about 100 families. Before there was no market in this village so they had to go far to sell, to Shaplapur and Whykong. They couldn’t even cover their transportation costs by selling only one or two kilogrammes of vegetables.”

Today a small marketplace has brought big changes to their lives. Set up by UNHCR and aid partner CNRS, the collection centre helps unite local farmers so they can sell their crops locally for a better price.

SOUNDBITE (English) Subrata Kumar Chakrabarty, UNHCR Livelihoods Officer:
“It has a positive impact since they don’t need to pay the transportation cost. Moreover, they have a bargaining capacity to increase the price which is positively impacting their food security.”

UNHCR’s farm support extends to thousands in Rohingya refugee settlements and the host communities nearby providing specialised training, crop seeds and farm supplies. In the COVID-19 pandemic families receive cash benefits, too. Aid has taken Mathana from desperation to hope. She can support her family and nurture ambitions for herself.

SOUNDBITE (Chakma) Mathana Chakma, Farmer:
“In the future I hope to get a job, I want to stand on my own feet. I am not worried about what happened in the past. I left it all in the past. I don’t want a big house. I just want a beautiful, happy family with my siblings, and that is my future.”

UNHCR responded by increasing livelihoods support through training, agricultural inputs, cash support and the creation of vegetable collection centres. More than 7,500 local families have been provided with livelihoods support, while more than 2,000 families have been lifted from extreme poverty through the Ultra-poor Graduation Approach. A further 36,500 families received emergency cash assistance in 2020.
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UNHCR
Alternate Title
unifeed210518b
Asset ID
2620009