FAO / FOOD CRISES GLOBAL REPORT

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04-May-2021 00:07:04
Mounting numbers of people face acute hunger and require urgent life-saving assistance, with number acutely hungry people in countries hit by food crises reaching in 2020 the highest level in five years, an annual report launched by an international alliance of UN, governmental and non-governmental agencies working to tackle food crises together has found. FAO

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STORY: FAO / FOOD CRISES GLOBAL REPORT
TRT: 7:04
SOURCE: FAO
RESTRICTIONS: PLEASE CREDIT FAO FOOTAGE ON SCREEN / EMBARGOED TILL 5 MAY 2021, 08:00 GMT, 10:00 CET, 04:00 AM EST
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: FILE

SHOTLIST:

FILE – JULY 2017, KASAI PROVINCE, DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF THE CONGO

1. Various shots, people walking in the street
2. Close up, a woman’s face

FILE – MARCH 2018, COX’S BAZAR, BANGLADESH

3. Various shots, Rohingya people walking inside camp

FILE – JULY 2017 - LERIBE DISTRICT, LESOTHO

4. Wide shot, Woman in a maize field harvesting maize from the stalk

FILE – MARCH 2020, IBB GOVERNORATE, YEMEN

5. Close up, hand digging the earth
6. Wide shot, Farmer removing grass from a field

FILE – 07 MARCH 2016, AFAR REGION, ETHIOPIA

7. Wide shot, undernourished cattle on a country road
8. Wide shot, young herder

FILE – JUNE 2020, TURKANA COUNTY, KENYA

9. Wide shot, desert locust eating leaves
10. Wide shot, farmer trying to disperse locusts

FILE – JULY 2017, ARGHAKHANCHI DISTRICT, NEPAL

11. Wide shot, water buffaloes walking on dry riverbank
12. Close up, women farmers

27 APRIL 2021, ROME, ITALY

13. SOUNDBITE (English) Dominique Burgeon, FAO Emergency and Resilience director:
“In short the main finding of this report is that 2020 was a very dark year for humanity, in more ways than one. Of course, the suffering inflicted by the COVID-19 pandemic was on our television screens every evening. But what this report also tells us is that in addition to that human misery, 155 million women, children and men were enduring in 2020 what we call ‘high levels of acute food insecurity.’ That actually represents an increase of around 20 million people compared the last edition of this Global Report on Food Crises.”

21 JULY 2019, SANA'A GOVERNORATE, KHAWLAN DISTRICT, YEMEN

14. Wide shot, sunrise view from Khawlan
15. Wide shot, dry vineyard

26 JULY 2016, MERILLE, SOMALIA

16. Wide shot, a skeleton of a dead animal in the desert
17. Wide shot, undernourished goat

1 SEPTEMBER 2020, GAIBANDHA DISTRICT, NORTHWEST BANGLADESH

18. Wide shot, aerial shot of flooded area
19. Wide shot, aerial shot of damaged riverbank and banana plants caused by monsoon floods

NOVEMBER 2017, PAMPANGA PROVINCE, LUBAO, PHILIPPINES

20. Wide shot, aerial shot of damaged coconut palms

2016, HAITI

21. Wide shot, tracking shot of aftermath of Hurricane Matthew

27 APRIL 2021, ROME, ITALY

22. SOUNDBITE (English) Dominique Burgeon, FAO Emergency and Resilience director:
“This report tells us that conflict remains the number one driver of acute hunger. As a matter of fact, 99 million people were facing acute food insecurity in 23 countries and territories where conflict and insecurity were the primary driver. Conflict was followed by economic shocks, many of which were already a factor before COVID-19 even started, but which have been badly exacerbated by the pandemic. Climate disruptions and weather extremes such as droughts and floods, were the third most significant drivers of acute hunger in 2020.”

FILE - APRIL 2020 - ALEPPO GOVERNORATE, SYRIA

23. Wide shot, FAO expert following the installation of low tunnels as part of an FAO project helping farmers produce amid COVID-19 pandemic as part of a programme to enhance the livelihood opportunities of smallholders
24. Wide shot, farmers wearing masks installing the low tunnel arches

27 APRIL 2021, ROME, ITALY

25. SOUNDBITE (English) Dominique Burgeon, FAO Emergency and Resilience director:
“To prevent widespread famine from breaking out in 2021, humanitarian action is needed now to save lives and save livelihoods on a massive scale. FAO is on the ground, providing desperately needed livelihoods assistance so rural populations can continue to produce and access food. But we urgently need resources. And why so? We know from experience that even in difficult crises contexts, it is possible to help people produce food that keeps them alive. We know that no matter what, no matter the situation they are in, farmers are farmers and they will try to keep farming, even in the most difficult circumstances. Our goal therefore is to help them farming. Preventing famine starts with producing food right where it is needed most.

MARCH 2020, IBB GOVERNORATE, YEMEN

26. Wide shot, water tank with European Union and FAO logos
27. Various shots, water running out of a tube, running into a field
28. Wide shot, farmer at work

27 APRIL 2021, ROME, ITALY

29. SOUNDBITE (English) Dominique Burgeon, FAO Emergency and Resilience director:
“We need to work together, from national governments, to local organizations, UN agencies and NGOs, to the private sector, to radically transform our agrifood systems so that they are more inclusive, more resilient and more sustainable. That means anticipating crises with on-the-ground real-time early warning and rapid action when we see a deterioration. It also means strengthening social safety nets, so when a crisis happens, people have somewhere to turn to.”

9 AND 10 NOVEMBER 2020, AZAZA VILLAGE, SUDAN

30. Wide shot, FAO staff arriving on a UN marked 4x4 vehicle to assess the damages caused by floods
31. Wide shot, FAO staff interacting with local farmers
32. Various shots, flooded fields

27 APRIL 2021, ROME, ITALY

33. SOUNDBITE (English) Dominique Burgeon, FAO Emergency and Resilience director:
“It also means advocacy. Advocacy that is backed up by political commitment and sufficient funds, to rectify the overwhelming impact and burden of climate change on the most vulnerable. Overall, it means massive investments in building the resilience of people, of their livelihoods, and of their communities so they can cope with inevitable shocks.”

2016, HAITI

34. Wide shot, Seeds distribution
35. Close up, a hand taking seeds from a bag

26 JULY 2016, MERILLE, SOMALIA

36. Wide shot, the village
37. Various shots, a veterinarian giving treatment to sheep

NOVEMBER 2017, PAMPANGA PROVINCE, LUBAO, PHILIPPINES

38. Wide shot, a man installing a battery on a drone as part of an FAO project to map out at-risk areas of agricultural land
39. Close up, a battery being installed on a drone
40. Wide shot, drone being launched in the sky

23 FEBRUARY 2017, SHAMVA, ZIMBABWE

41. Wide shot, Farmer and Fao officer walking close to a maize field to assess damages caused by Fall Armyworm
42. Wide shot, Farmer opening leaves
43. Close up, armyworm on a leaf

JUNE 2020, TURKANA COUNTY, KENYA

44. Close up, desert locust hoppers on the ground
45. Close up, Hoppers eating crops
46. Wide shot, spray vehicle spraying pesticide

4 APRIL 2020, SAMBURU COUNTY, SEREN, KENYA

47. Wide shot of an FAO airplane spraying pesticide

JULY 2015, HONDURAS

48. Various shots, containers being loaded onto a ship

APRIL 2018, TURKEY

49. Wide shot, women picking olives
50. Wide shot, women working in an orange processing plant
51. Wide shot, women working in a dried tomato processing plant
52. Wide shot, woman at work in a food processing plant

8 OCTOBER 2020, NJORO, KENYA

53. Various shots, Njoro town market

STORYLINE:

Mounting numbers of people face acute hunger and require urgent life-saving assistance, with number acutely hungry people in countries hit by food crises reaching in 2020 the highest level in five years, an annual report launched by an international alliance of UN, governmental and non-governmental agencies working to tackle food crises together has found.

The Global Network Against Food Crises’ report reveals that at least 155 million people experienced acute food insecurity at Crisis or worse levels (IPC/CH Phase 3 or above) across 55 countries and territories in 2020. This represents an increase of around 20 million people from the previous year, and a confirmation of a worrisome trend: acute food insecurity has been rising steadily over the past five years.

One year after COVID-19 spread across the world, the 2021 edition of the Global Report on Food Crises (GRFC) confirms that the pandemic and related containment measures have aggravated the impact of pre-existing fragilities, notably conflict and climate change.

The resulting economic hardship has widened inequalities and exposed the structural vulnerabilities of local and global food systems, hitting already fragile contexts and vulnerable groups.

The worst food crises in 2020, in order of severity, were: the Democratic Republic of the Congo; Yemen; Afghanistan; the Syrian Arab Republic; the Sudan; northern Nigeria; Ethiopia; South Sudan; Zimbabwe; and Haiti.

Together these 10 countries and territories were home to over 103 million of the 155 million people suffering from high acute hunger in 2020.

Countries in Africa remained disproportionally affected by acute food insecurity. Close to 98 million people facing acute food insecurity in 2020 were on the African continent, that is 63% of the global share.

Acute food insecurity is the most extreme end of the hunger spectrum (IPC/CH Phase 3 or above). This means people are unable to feed their families and could be forced to either sell off household assets for cash, or rely on external assistance, to survive.

SOUNDBITE (English) Dominique Burgeon, FAO Emergency and Resilience director: “In short the main finding of this report is that 2020 was a very dark year for humanity, in more ways than one. Of course, the suffering inflicted by the COVID-19 pandemic was on our television screens every evening. But what this report also tells us is that in addition to that human misery, 155 million women, children and men were enduring in 2020 what we call ‘high levels of acute food insecurity.’ That actually represents an increase of around 20 million people compared the last edition of this Global Report on Food Crises.”

In 2020 conflict was the main driver of food crises at the global level, followed by economic shocks and weather extremes.

Almost 100 million people were in acute food insecurity in 23 countries and territories where conflict and insecurity were the primary driver. In 2019 they were 77 million.

Economic shocks, heavily related to measures to contain the COVID-19 pandemic, were the second most important driver, with over 40 million people in acute food insecurity in 17 countries and territories. In 2019 they were 24 million in 8 countries.

Weather extremes were the primary driver of acute food insecurity with over 15 million people affected in 2020.

SOUNDBITE (English) Dominique Burgeon, FAO Emergency and Resilience director: “This report tells us that conflict remains the number one driver of acute hunger. As a matter of fact, 99 million people were facing acute food insecurity in 23 countries and territories where conflict and insecurity were the primary driver. Conflict was followed by economic shocks, many of which were already a factor before COVID-19 even started, but which have been badly exacerbated by the pandemic. Climate disruptions and weather extremes such as droughts and floods, were the third most significant drivers of acute hunger in 2020.”

People in food crises need a range of urgent help, from lifesaving humanitarian assistance to life-sustaining livelihoods support.

SOUNDBITE (English) Dominique Burgeon, FAO Emergency and Resilience director:
“To prevent widespread famine from breaking out in 2021, humanitarian action is needed now to save lives and save livelihoods on a massive scale. FAO is on the ground, providing desperately needed livelihoods assistance so rural populations can continue to produce and access food. But we urgently need resources. And why so? We know from experience that even in difficult crises contexts, it is possible to help people produce food that keeps them alive. We know that no matter what, no matter the situation they are in, farmers are farmers and they will try to keep farming, even in the most difficult circumstances. Our goal therefore is to help them farming. Preventing famine starts with producing food right where it is needed most.

The Food and Agriculture Organization of the UN (FAO) and the partners of the Global Network against Food Crises are committed to working alongside affected populations, governments and stakeholders at national, regional and the global levels to address all dimensions of food crises by strengthening coordinated actions to combating food insecurity and preventing famine.

SOUNDBITE (English) Dominique Burgeon, FAO Emergency and Resilience director:
“We need to work together, from national governments, to local organizations, UN agencies and NGOs, to the private sector, to radically transform our agrifood systems so that they are more inclusive, more resilient and more sustainable. That means anticipating crises with on-the-ground real-time early warning and rapid action when we see a deterioration. It also means strengthening social safety nets, so when a crisis happens, people have somewhere to turn to.”

The members of the Global Network Against Food Crises are asking for concerted advocacy and political commitment, backed up with sufficient resources, to rectify the overwhelming burden of climate change on the most vulnerable.

SOUNDBITE (English) Dominique Burgeon, FAO Emergency and Resilience director:
“It also means advocacy. Advocacy that is backed up by political commitment and sufficient funds, to rectify the overwhelming impact and burden of climate change on the most vulnerable. Overall, it means massive investments in building the resilience of people, of their livelihoods, and of their communities so they can cope with inevitable shocks.”

Founded by the EU, FAO and WFP in 2016, the Global Network Against Food Crises is an alliance of humanitarian and development actors working together to prevent, prepare for, and respond to food crises and support the Sustainable Development Goal to End Hunger (SDG 2).

The Global Report on Food Crises is the flagship publication of the Global Network and is facilitated by the Food Security Information Network (FSIN). The Report is the result of a consensus-based and multi-partner analytical process involving 16 international humanitarian and development partners.
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