UN / SEXUAL VIOLENCE IN CONFLICT

Preview Language:   Original
14-Apr-2021 00:02:59
UN Special Representative on Sexual Violence in Conflict Pramilla Patten said building back better from the COVID-19 pandemic requires an “inclusive, intersectional, and gender-informed approach” and demands a paradigm shift: “to silence the guns and amplify the voices of women; to invest in public welfare rather than the instruments of warfare.” UNIFEED

Available Language: English
Type
Language
Format
Acquire
/
English
Other Formats
Description
STORY: UN / SEXUAL VIOLENCE IN CONFLICT
TRT: 2:59
SOURCE: UNIFEED
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / FRENCH / NATS

DATELINE: 14 APRIL 2021, NEW YORK CITY

SHOTLIST:

FILE – NEW YORK CITY

1. Med shot, UN flag outside headquarters with cars passing in foreground

14 APRIL 2021, NEW YORK CITY

2. Multiple screens, participants in Security Council virtual meeting
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Pramilla Patten, Special Representative of the Secretary-General on Sexual Violence in Conflict, United Nations:
“It may be many months before we know the full scale and magnitude – the extent and impact – of these atrocities. There is no question that this Council has adopted ground-breaking resolutions to combat sexual violence. But the question could be asked: What do these resolutions mean right now on the ground in Tigray? When history looks back on this painful episode – as part of the long litany of battles fought on the bodies of women and girls, from Bosnia, to Rwanda, Iraq, Syria and elsewhere – we will rightly be asked what we did to honour our commitments.”
4. Multiple screens, participants in Security Council virtual meeting
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Pramilla Patten, Special Representative of the Secretary-General on Sexual Violence in Conflict, United Nations:
“Proactive measures to foster an enabling environment for survivors to safely come forward and seek redress have become more urgent than ever. Many survivors have broken their silence; but many others have been broken by the silence forced upon them. Shame, isolation, rejection, and the anguish of having nowhere to turn, has shattered lives and livelihoods.”
6. Multiple screens, participants in Security Council virtual meeting
7. SOUNDBITE (English) Pramilla Patten, Special Representative of the Secretary-General on Sexual Violence in Conflict, United Nations:
“If applied in a timely and consistent manner, sanctions can change the calculus of parties that operate on the assumption that rape is “cost-free” – or even profitable – in the political economy of war in which women are trafficked, traded and sold.”
8. Multiple screens, participants in Security Council virtual meeting
9. SOUNDBITE (English) Pramilla Patten, Special Representative of the Secretary-General on Sexual Violence in Conflict, United Nations:
“Building back better in the wake of this pandemic requires an inclusive, intersectional, and gender-informed approach. Let us not miss or misunderstand this moment. This is not just a point in time; it is a turning point in history. The pandemic demands a paradigm shift: to silence the guns and amplify the voices of women; to invest in public welfare rather than the instruments of warfare.”
10. Multiple screens, participants in Security Council virtual meeting
11. SOUNDBITE (French) Denis Mukwege, Nobel Peace Prize Laureate:
“We are still far away from being able to draw a red line against the use of rape and sexual violence as a strategy of war, domination and terror. Thus, our fight continues to build a world where every woman and every girl as the right to live a life safe from violence, because the overwhelming majority of victims still do not receive the assistance and the support that they need nor do they have access to justice and to the reparations for the atrocities they have suffered.”
12. Multiple screens, participants in Security Council virtual meeting

STORYLINE:

UN Special Representative on Sexual Violence in Conflict Pramilla Patten said building back better from the COVID-19 pandemic requires an “inclusive, intersectional, and gender-informed approach” and demands a paradigm shift: “to silence the guns and amplify the voices of women; to invest in public welfare rather than the instruments of warfare.”

Speaking at a virtual meeting of the Security Council today (14 Apr), Patten presented the findings of her office’s 2020 annual report, which covers 18 country situations and documents over 2,500 UN-verified cases of conflict-related sexual violence. She called for concerted efforts to ensure that survivors of sexual violence are not obscured beneath the long shadow cast by the COVID-19 pandemic.

Patten said the chronic underreporting of wartime sexual violence has been compounded by COVID-19. Proactive measures to help survivors safely come forward and seek redress have become more urgent than ever, she told the Members of the Council.

SOUNDBITE (English) Pramilla Patten, Special Representative of the Secretary-General on Sexual Violence in Conflict, United Nations:
“Proactive measures to foster an enabling environment for survivors to safely come forward and seek redress have become more urgent than ever. Many survivors have broken their silence; but many others have been broken by the silence forced upon them. Shame, isolation, rejection, and the anguish of having nowhere to turn, has shattered lives and livelihoods.”

Turning to Tigray, The Special Representative said women and girls have been subjected to sexual violence with a level of cruelty beyond comprehension. She said the report presented today records allegations of over 100 rape cases since hostilities began in November last year. She said her Office had engaged with authorities at the highest-level and would continue to closely monitor the situation, calling for restraint, humanitarian access, service-provision, and effective investigation.

SOUNDBITE (English) Pramilla Patten, Special Representative of the Secretary-General on Sexual Violence in Conflict, United Nations:
“It may be many months before we know the full scale and magnitude – the extent and impact – of these atrocities. There is no question that this Council has adopted ground-breaking resolutions to combat sexual violence. But the question could be asked: What do these resolutions mean right now on the ground in Tigray? When history looks back on this painful episode – as part of the long litany of battles fought on the bodies of women and girls, from Bosnia, to Rwanda, Iraq, Syria and elsewhere – we will rightly be asked what we did to honour our commitments.”

This year’s report lists 52 parties credibly suspected of committing or being responsible for patterns of sexual violence in situations on the agenda of the Council. Over 70 per cent are persistent perpetrators, having appeared on the list for five or more years without taking remedial or corrective action. Patten said it was critical to ensure greater coherence between the practice of listing and the practice of levying targeted and graduated measures by sanctions committees.

SOUNDBITE (English) Pramilla Patten, Special Representative of the Secretary-General on Sexual Violence in Conflict, United Nations:
“If applied in a timely and consistent manner, sanctions can change the calculus of parties that operate on the assumption that rape is “cost-free” – or even profitable – in the political economy of war in which women are trafficked, traded and sold.”
The Special Representative stressed that building back better in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic requires “an inclusive, intersectional, and gender-informed approach.” She added, “Let us not miss or misunderstand this moment. This is not just a point in time; it is a turning point in history. The pandemic demands a paradigm shift: to silence the guns and amplify the voices of women; to invest in public welfare rather than the instruments of warfare.”

Nobel Peace Prize Laureate Denis Mukwege said the issue of sexual violence in conflict was finally gaining visibility, but progress in international law should not hide the fact that the scourge of sexual violence continues to prevail in all situations of conflict. He stressed that the responses to sexual violence in conflict remain under-funded and the climate of impunity remains more the rule than the exception.

SOUNDBITE (French) Denis Mukwege, Nobel Peace Prize Laureate:
“We are still far away from being able to draw a red line against the use of rape and sexual violence as a strategy of war, domination and terror. Thus, our fight continues to build a world where every woman and every girl as the right to live a life safe from violence, because the overwhelming majority of victims still do not receive the assistance and the support that they need nor do they have access to justice and to the reparations for the atrocities they have suffered.”

Mukwege said the greatest challenge today is to effectively implement the existing normative frameworks and turn commitments by the Security Council to tangible realities.
Series
Category
Topical Subjects
Corporate Subjects
Creator
UNIFEED
Alternate Title
unifeed210414c
Asset ID
2612618