COLOMBIA / AMAZON COVID-19 VACCINATION DOOR-TO-DOOR

Preview Language:   Original
07-Apr-2021 00:05:10
In Colombia, vulnerable indigenous communities in the Amazon region are among the priority groups for COVID-19 vaccination. In the riverside settlement of Paujil Indigenous reserve, health teams go door-to-door to vaccinate as many eligible community residents as possible. WHO

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STORY: COLOMBIA / AMAZON COVID-19 VACCINATIONS DOOR-TO-DOOR
TRT: 05:10
SOURCE: WHO
RESTRICTIONS: CREDIT WHO ON SCREEN
LANGUAGE: SPANISH / NATS

DATELINE: 18 MARCH 2021, PAUJIL INDIGENOUS RESERVE, INÍRIDA, COLOMBIA

SHOTLIST:

1. Various shots, health workers in a boat on the Inírida river
2. Wide shot, vaccinators walking in the outskirts of Inirida, in Paujil Indigenous reserve
3. Med shot, vaccinators walking in the outskirts of Inirida, in Paujil Indigenous reserve
4. Wide shot, vaccinators making contact with community residents door-to-door
5. Wide shot, vaccinators filling in forms with a woman who resides in the community
6. Med shot, vaccinators filling in forms with a woman who resides in the community
7. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Dr Ivy Talavera, Advisor in Family, Gender and Life course, World Health Organization (WHO):
“In the specific case of the Amazonian populations, we know that these populations live in vulnerable conditions. We have difficulties of access, due to geography, unequal economic opportunities and unequal access to services. And all these social determinants of health contribute to a much more limited access. Making it available requires much more important and intensified reinforcements, not only regarding health. It has to be an articulated response beyond health to provide the vaccine in remote locations.”
8. Wide shot, vaccinators looking at a map of the area
9. Close up, vaccinators looking at a map of the area
10. Various shot, vaccinators reaching out to an indigenous family
11. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Dr Ivy Talavera, Advisor in Family, Gender and Life course, World Health Organization (WHO):
“We cannot act in the same way as in a city. So, we have to diversify our actions on the territory. Therefore, if we have a population, especially a population living in a reserve, indigenous population, it is important to recognize that they have diversity and they have their own cultural factors, their own factors of coexistence that make them different, but do not mean different in terms of how to carry the vaccination. So, these cultural elements are important to take into consideration in order to have the possibility that they also have access to the safe vaccine.”
12. Various shots, vaccinator putting on gloves while explaining the vaccination process to a man about to be vaccinated
13. Various shots, vaccine recipient listening to vaccinator instruction
14. Med shot, vaccination coordinator filling in forms with vaccine recipient
15. Med shot, vaccine receiver signing vaccination consent form
16. Close up, vaccinator pulling the COVID-19 vaccine into a syringe
17. Various shots, vaccinator injecting COVID-19 vaccine into the man's arm
18. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Dr Ivy Talavera, Advisor in Family, Gender and Life course, World Health Organization (WHO):
“There comes an important process which is communication. How does the message convey so that it can be accepted by different populations: risk communication, safety of the vaccine, how to really convey the message at the level of their languages with their own particularities, understand the idiosyncrasies of the population. How they really think, how they interpret the health-disease process. Those anthropological elements of creation and local behavior at the level of indigenous populations have to be taken into account.”
19. Wide shot, women washing clothes, children playing in the river
20. Wide shot, people on boats
21. Drone shot, sky view of the community

STORYLINE:

In Colombia, vulnerable indigenous communities in the Amazon region are among the priority groups for COVID-19 vaccination. In the riverside settlement of Paujil Indigenous reserve, health teams go door-to-door to vaccinate as many eligible community residents as possible.

SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Dr Ivy Talavera, Advisor in Family, Gender and Life course, World Health Organization (WHO):
“In the specific case of the Amazonian populations, we know that these populations live in vulnerable conditions. We have difficulties of access, due to geography, unequal economic opportunities and unequal access to services. And all these social determinants of health contribute to a much more limited access. Making it available requires much more important and intensified reinforcements, not only regarding health. It has to be an articulated response beyond health to provide the vaccine in remote locations.”

As of 5 April 2021, more than 2.4 million COVID-19 cases have been confirmed in Colombia, resulting in almost 64 000 deaths in the country. Colombian authorities are addressing the challenge of reaching out to remote indigenous communities, some of which are only accessible by air or by river.

SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Dr Ivy Talavera, Advisor in Family, Gender and Life course, World Health Organization (WHO):
“We cannot act in the same way as in a city. So, we have to diversify our actions on the territory. Therefore, if we have a population, especially a population living in a reserve, indigenous population, it is important to recognize that they have diversity and they have their own cultural factors, their own factors of coexistence that make them different, but do not mean different in terms of how to carry the vaccination. So, these cultural elements are important to take into consideration in order to have the possibility that they also have access to the safe vaccine.”

(English translation) “We cannot act in the same way as in a city. So, we have to diversify our actions on the territory. Therefore, if we have a population, especially a population living in a reserve, indigenous population, it is important to recognize that they have diversity and they have their own cultural factors, their own factors of coexistence that make them different, but do not mean different in terms of how to carry the vaccination. So, these cultural elements are important to take into consideration in order to have the possibility that they also have access to the safe vaccine.”

In order to reach a large part of the population among indigenous communities, the Colombian health authorities have to adapt their strategy to the area, taking into account cultural specificities and working with indigenous health workers and field vaccinators to ease the process.

SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Dr Ivy Talavera, Advisor in Family, Gender and Life course, World Health Organization (WHO):
“There comes an important process which is communication. How does the message convey so that it can be accepted by different populations: risk communication, safety of the vaccine, how to really convey the message at the level of their languages with their own particularities, understand the idiosyncrasies of the population. How they really think, how they interpret the health-disease process. Those anthropological elements of creation and local behavior at the level of indigenous populations have to be taken into account.”

On 1 March 2021, Colombia became the first country in the Americas to receive COVID-19 vaccines through the COVAX Facility, marking an historic step toward the goal of ensuring equitable distribution of COVID-19 vaccines in the region and worldwide. The COVAX vaccines add to the vaccination campaign that the Colombian government started on February 17, with doses obtained from bilateral agreements with the producers.

COVAX, the vaccines pillar of the Access to COVID-19 Tools (ACT) Accelerator, is co-led by the Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations (CEPI), Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance and WHO working in partnership with developed and developing country vaccine manufacturers, UNICEF, PAHO Revolving Fund, the World Bank, and others. It is the only global initiative that is working with governments and manufacturers to ensure COVID-19 vaccines are available worldwide to both higher-income and lower-income countries.
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unifeed210407e
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2611529