UN / COMMISSION STATUS OF WOMEN

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15-Mar-2021 00:03:28
Speaking at the opening of 65th Session of the Commission on the Status of Women, UN chief António Guterres said, “what we need is not more training for women, but to train those in power on how to build inclusive institutions. We need to move beyond fixing women and instead fix our systems.” UNIFEED

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STORY: UN / COMMISSION STATUS OF WOMEN
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LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 15 MARCH 2021, NEW YORK CITY / FILE

SHOTLIST:

RECENT – NEW YORK CITY

1.Close up, UN flag

15 MARCH 2021, NEW YORK CITY

2.Wide shot, General Assembly Hall
3. SOUNDBITE (English) António Guterres, Secretary-General, United Nations:
“What we need is not more training for women, but to train those in power on how to build inclusive institutions. We need to move beyond fixing women and instead fix our systems. We must also support women leaders in all their diversity and abilities – including young women, migrant women, indigenous women, women with disabilities, women of colour and LGBTIQ+.”
4.Wide shot, General Assembly Hall
5. SOUNDBITE (English) António Guterres, Secretary-General, United Nations:
“Pandemic recovery is our chance to engineer a re-set, reignite the Decade of Action for the Sustainable Development Goals and chart a path to an equal future for women and men. I call on all leaders to put in place five key building blocks: First, realize women’s equal rights fully, including by repealing discriminatory laws and enacting positive measures. Second, ensure equal representation – from company boards to parliaments, from higher education to public institutions – through special measures including quotas. Third, advance women’s economic inclusion through equal pay, targeted credit, job protection and significant investments in the care economy and social protection. Fourth, to enact an emergency response plan in each country to address violence against women and girls, and follow through with funding, policies, and political will. Fifth, to give space to the intergenerational transition that is under way. From the frontlines to online, young women are advocating for a more just and equal world – and merit greater support.”
6. Wide shot, General Assembly Hall
7. SOUNDBITE (English) Volkan Bozkir, President of the General Assembly:
“I call on all Member States to strengthen legislation against gender-based violence; establish reporting and redress mechanisms, for victims; commit to data collection, election observation, and violence monitoring and consider special and well-designed gender targets.”
8. Wide shot, General Assembly Hall
9. SOUNDBITE (English) Volkan Bozkir, President of the General Assembly:
“For no woman should feel the need, to justify her presence. Or make herself smaller, so that others are comfortable. Or fear expressing herself, exercising her right to vote, or seeking election to public office. No woman should be under threat, underpaid, or underestimated.”
10. Wide shot, General Assembly Hall
11. SOUNDBITE (English) Dubravka Simonovic, United Nations Special Rapporteur On Violence Against Women, Its Causes And Consequences:
“I also call on States to harmonize definitions of rape with international human rights standards, and to explicitly include lack of consent at its centre. Furthermore, urge States to abolish statutes of limitation for the prosecution of rape in conflict and in peace and to accelerate the harmonization of their laws on rape with international standards.”
12.Wide shot, General Assembly Hall

STORYLINE:

Speaking at the opening of 65th Session of the Commission on the Status of Women (CSW), UN chief António Guterres said, “what we need is not more training for women, but to train those in power on how to build inclusive institutions. We need to move beyond fixing women and instead fix our systems.”

In his remarks at the General Assembly Hall today (15 Mar), Guterres said that the COVID-19 pandemic is a crisis with a woman’s face and the fallout has shown how deeply gender inequality remains embedded in the world’s political, social and economic systems.

He stated that too often, when addressing the challenge of exclusion, it is suggested that the world should focus on training, capacity building, empowerment for women. But women already have the skills, the expertise and the capacity. He added that in many countries, women are graduating from higher education at higher rates than men -- and have been for some time.

The UN chief reiterated, “we must also support women leaders in all their diversity and abilities – including young women, migrant women, indigenous women, women with disabilities, women of colour and LGBTIQ+.”

Stating “pandemic recovery is our chance to engineer a re-set, reignite the Decade of Action for the Sustainable Development Goals and chart a path to an equal future for women and men,” Guterres called on all leaders to put in place five key building blocks.

He explained, “First, realize women’s equal rights fully, including by repealing discriminatory laws and enacting positive measures. Second, ensure equal representation – from company boards to parliaments, from higher education to public institutions – through special measures including quotas.”

The third is advancing women’s economic inclusion through equal pay, targeted credit, job protection and significant investments in the care economy and social protection.

The UN chief continued, “fourth, to enact an emergency response plan in each country to address violence against women and girls, and follow through with funding, policies, and political will. Fifth, to give space to the intergenerational transition that is under way. From the frontlines to online, young women are advocating for a more just and equal world – and merit greater support.”

Also speaking at the opening of the CSW, the President of the General Assembly Volkan Bozkir called on all Member States to “strengthen legislation against gender-based violence; establish reporting and redress mechanisms, for victims; commit to data collection, election observation, and violence monitoring and consider special and well-designed gender targets.”

Bozkir stated, “for no woman should feel the need, to justify her presence. Or make herself smaller, so that others are comfortable. Or fear expressing herself, exercising her right to vote, or seeking election to public office. No woman should be under threat, underpaid, or underestimated.”

Dubravka Simonovic, United Nations Special Rapporteur On Violence Against Women also spoke at the opening. She stated that her final thematic report to the Human Rights Council, in 2021 will address the prevention of rape as a human rights violation, a crime and a manifestation of gender-based violence against women and girls, both in peace and in conflict, with focus on States’ responsibility to prevent it, to change the prevalent rape culture or culture of impunity for perpetrators and stigmatization of victims.

She called on States to “harmonize definitions of rape with international human rights standards, and to explicitly include lack of consent at its centre.”

Furthermore, she urged States to “abolish statutes of limitation for the prosecution of rape in conflict and in peace and to accelerate the harmonization of their laws on rape with international standards.”
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