WFP / SYRIA 10 YEARS

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11-Mar-2021 00:04:02
After a decade of upheaval, conflict and displacement, Syrians are facing the worst humanitarian conditions since the start of the crisis, with millions of people sliding into hunger in the last year alone, according to the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP). WFP

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STORY: WFP / SYRIA 10 YEARS
TRT: 04:02
SOURCE: WFP
RESTRICTIONS: PLEASE CREDIT WFP ON SCREEN
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / ARABIC / NATS

DATELINE: 02 MARCH 21, ROME, ITALY / 29 JANUARY 2021, 22-24 FEBRUARY 2021, ALEPPO, SYRIA / FILE

SHOTLIST:

FILE- 6 OCTOBER 2020, ALEPPO, SYRIA

1. Various shots, general views of Aleppo which has suffered massive destruction, death and displacement since the onset of the war

24 FEBRUARY 2021, ALEPPO, SYRIA

2. Various shots, marketplace

22 FEBRUARY 2021, ALEPPO, SYRIA

3. Tilt up, Abo Mohammed’s grocery store, situated in a destroyed building in the Sukari area of Aleppo
4. SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Abo Mohammed, Grocery Store Vendor:
“My sales have really dropped - around 50 percent - because of the increase in prices. Sometimes people even buy pieces of a vegetable because they can’t afford a whole one. This is what is happening now.”

29 JANUARY 2021, ALEPPO, SYRIA

5.Various shots, child being tested and receiving nutritious supplementary food at Al Dablan nutrition clinic

02 MARCH 2021, ROME, ITALY

6. SOUNDBITE (English) Arif Hussain, Chief Economist, World Food Programme (WFP):
“You have COVID, you have loss of the value of the currency itself and then you have mass displacement. So when you put all of these things together there is no surprise that we are seeing rising food insecurity, rising hunger, not only in the breadth, meaning lots and lots of people, but also in the depth, meaning people are closer to starvation today than ever before.”

22 FEBRUARY 2021, ALEPPO, SYRIA

7. Various shots, Om Muhammad, a widowed mother of 8 children, at home in the Sukari area
8. SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Om Muhammad, Displaced Person:
“One day a mortar hit our house when we were living in the Menyan area. When my husband came home and saw the destruction, he thought we had all been killed and was so shocked he died from a heart attack. We suffered a lot.”
9. Various shots, Om Muhammad eating rice cooked on a kerosene pump stove
10. SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Om Muhammad, Displaced Person:
“We haven’t had meat since Eid Adha (31 July 2020). And when I go to the market, I can only look at the vegetables because they are so expensive.”
11. Various shots, Om Muhammad and her children in the living room

02 MARCH 21, ROME, ITALY


12. SOUNDBITE (English) Arif Hussain, Chief Economist, World Food Programme (WFP):
“Imagine a 12-year old. Today they can vote. 21, 22 years old and all they have seen is war. So, what we need to do, first and foremost we need to get to peace. And the second thing is to rebuild. Rebuild the population, rebuild the children making sure they start going to school, making sure they have better nutrition and then also helping to rebuild the infrastructure.”

24 FEBRUARY 2021, ALEPPO, SYRIA

13. Various shots, WFP food distribution.

23 FEBRUARY 2021, ALEPPO, SYRIA

14. Various shots, people in long waiting queues for subsidized bread.

STORYLINE:

After a decade of upheaval, conflict and displacement, Syrians are facing the worst humanitarian conditions since the start of the crisis, with millions of people sliding into hunger in the last year alone, according to the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP).

Syrians are facing multiple shocks, including the collapse of the Syrian pound, its impact on the price of basic commodities, the fall-out from the financial crisis in Lebanon, as well as the ongoing hostilities and large-scale displacement. The Covid-19 pandemic has further exacerbated the food security situation.

Some 4.5 million people have sunk into hunger and food insecurity in the last year alone.

SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Abo Mohammed, Grocery Store Vendor:
“My sales have really dropped - around 50 percent - because of the increase in prices. Sometimes people even buy pieces of a vegetable because they can’t afford a whole one. This is what is happening now.”

A recent assessment by WFP and partners estimates that a record 12.4 million Syrians – nearly 60 percent of the population – suffer from food insecurity and hunger today, double the number in 2018. The study also revealed that the number of people who cannot survive without food assistance has doubled in a year, reaching 1.3 million people.

SOUNDBITE (English) Arif Hussain, Chief Economist, World Food Programme (WFP):
“You have COVID, you have loss of the value of the currency itself and then you have mass displacement. So when you put all of these things together there is no surprise that we are seeing rising food insecurity, rising hunger, not only in the breadth, meaning lots and lots of people, but also in the depth, meaning people are closer to starvation today than ever before.”

Food prices have increased by more than 200 percent just in the last year. Families report that, even during the worst years of conflict, life was never as hard as it is now. Parents say they have not eaten meat and fruit for months as prices of staple foods have soared beyond reach.

SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Om Muhammad, Displaced Person:
“One day a mortar hit our house when we were living in the Menyan area. When my husband came home and saw the destruction, he thought we had all been killed and was so shocked he died from a heart attack. We suffered a lot.”

SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Om Muhammad, Displaced Person:
“We haven’t had meat since Eid Adha (31 July 2020). And when I go to the market, I can only look at the vegetables because they are so expensive.”


WFP has provided monthly food assistance for nearly 5 million people inside Syria over the past ten years, using every means available to reach people in need. WFP is also providing assistance for more than 1.5 million Syrian refugees in neighbouring Turkey, Lebanon, Jordan, Iraq and Egypt. These five countries host more than 5.6 million Syrians, the biggest refugee group in the world.

SOUNDBITE (English) Arif Hussain, Chief Economist, World Food Programme (WFP):
“Imagine a 12-year old. Today they can vote. 21, 22 years old and all they have seen is war. So, what we need to do, first and foremost we need to get to peace. And the second thing is to rebuild. Rebuild the population, rebuild the children making sure they start going to school, making sure they have better nutrition and then also helping to rebuild the infrastructure.”

The COVID-19 pandemic and the consequent economic downturn have pushed hundreds of thousands of Syrian refugees in the region deeper into poverty. Meanwhile, in the five countries hosting refugees, WFP is facing funding shortfalls and could soon be forced to choose between providing reduced rations or prioritising the most vulnerable only.

Across the region, progress made over the last ten years to improve food security are already being reversed; In Lebanon – where WFP is assisting nearly 900,000 Syrian refugees – the economic downturn, steep inflation, COVID-19 and finally the Beirut blast have pushed the number of Syrian refugee families living under the extreme poverty line to a staggering 89 percent in 2020, up from 55 per cent only a year before. Half of all Syrian refugees in the country are food insecure compared to 29% in 2019.

The United States, Germany and the European Commission have been WFP’s top donors over the past decade, providing a total of US$6.8 billion for operations inside Syria and in neighbouring countries.
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