UN / SOUTH SUDAN

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03-Mar-2021 00:02:37
The head of UN Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS), David Shearer told the Security Council, “protection of civilians through our peacekeepers is just one means of providing protection. More important in the long term is to create a protective environment where all citizens benefit from the rule of law.” UNIFEED

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STORY: UN / SOUTH SUDAN
TRT: 2:37
SOURCE: UNIFEED
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LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 03 MARCH 2021, NEW YORK CITY / FILE

SHOTLIST:

RECENT – NEW YORK CITY

1. Wide shot, exterior, United Nations Headquarters

03 MARCH 2021, NEW YORK CITY

2. Multiscreen
3. SOUNDBITE (English) David Shearer, Special Representative of the Secretary-General and Head of UNMISS:
“Protection of civilians through our peacekeepers is just one means of providing protection. More important in the long term is to create a protective environment where all citizens benefit from the rule of law. So, we are looking to redeploy staff and resources to build the capacity of important institutions, including the courts, justice system and national police. Individual Police Officers will train and mentor local police. We are also looking to build on the success of the mobile courts by making them permanent so that all victims have access to justice. It means putting South Sudanese in the hot seat to tackle the impunity that has plagued this country – particularly sexual violence – so we will ultimately have fewer victims.”
4. Multiscreen
5. SOUNDBITE (English) David Shearer, Special Representative of the Secretary-General and Head of UNMISS:
“The reality is, though, that the peace process remains extremely fragile. Many citizens are wary about the political will – they fear the positive progress may collapse. It is for those people that we, the international community, must remain united and committed to pushing the peace process forward. We can’t sit on the sidelines as spectators. Look back four years. That’s what failure looks like and it’s in no one’s interests to return.”
6. Multiscreen
7. SOUNDBITE (English) David Shearer, Special Representative of the Secretary-General and Head of UNMISS:
“True sovereignty means responsibility – being responsible – to really care, in a tangible and demonstrable way, for all the nation’s 12 million citizens. It also means independence. Yet, South Sudan is perhaps one of the most dependent nations in history. Its education and health systems, its roads and infrastructure are provided by outsiders. And that’s where I feel that we, the international community, also have responsibility. We fail to question our role – and we don’t acknowledge the influence of institutional pressures and ambitions on our actions. We have too eagerly stepped in and shouldered responsibilities that should be the job of the South Sudanese – and have added to their dependency – and, in doing so, undermined their dignity.”
8. Multiscreen

STORYLINE:

The head of UN Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS), David Shearer told the Security Council, “protection of civilians through our peacekeepers is just one means of providing protection. More important in the long term is to create a protective environment where all citizens benefit from the rule of law.”

Speaking to Security Council via a video link today (03 Mar), Shearer stated that the Mission is looking to redeploy staff and resources to “build the capacity of important institutions, including the courts, justice system and national police” in South Sudan, adding that individual Police Officers will train and mentor local police.

He continued, “We are also looking to build on the success of the mobile courts by making them permanent so that all victims have access to justice. It means putting South Sudanese in the hot seat to tackle the impunity that has plagued this country – particularly sexual violence – so we will ultimately have fewer victims.”

Today is Shearer’s last briefing to the Council as the Special Representative of the Secretary-General in South Sudan. Sharing his personal reflections after four years working in the country, he said that he can look back with a certain level of comfort about how far the country has come. There is a ceasefire, a peace deal, a transitional Government, a Presidency, Council of Ministers, Governors, and local leadership slowly being installed.

However, he said, “the reality is, though, that the peace process remains extremely fragile. Many citizens are wary about the political will – they fear the positive progress may collapse.”

The mission’s chief reiterated, “it is for those people that we, the international community, must remain united and committed to pushing the peace process forward. We can’t sit on the sidelines as spectators. Look back four years. That’s what failure looks like and it’s in no one’s interests to return.”

Shearer also stated that there are two areas that have not been confronted anywhere. The first is the continuing absence of a financial system that works for the people of South Sudan. He stated that the wealth of the country – from oil and elsewhere – bypasses its people, siphoned off in secrecy with no public accountability for how it is spent.

The second, Shearer said that he was struck by the immense pride South Sudanese have in their country and the massive UN presence will inevitably bump up against their hard-won sovereignty.

He explained, “true sovereignty means responsibility – being responsible – to really care, in a tangible and demonstrable way, for all the nation’s 12 million citizens. It also means independence. Yet, South Sudan is perhaps one of the most dependent nations in history. Its education and health systems, its roads and infrastructure are provided by outsiders. And that’s where I feel that we, the international community, also have responsibility.”

Shearer continued, “we fail to question our role – and we don’t acknowledge the influence of institutional pressures and ambitions on our actions. We have too eagerly stepped in and shouldered responsibilities that should be the job of the South Sudanese – and have added to their dependency – and, in doing so, undermined their dignity.”

He stated that State-building is a finely tuned endeavour that constantly needs to be re-evaluated and questioned.
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