WFP / CENTRAL AMERICA HUNGER

Preview Language:   Original
23-Feb-2021 00:04:14
Hunger in El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua has increased almost fourfold over the past two years - from 2.2 million people in 2018 to close to 8 million people in 2021 – a result of the economic crisis caused by COVID-19 and years of extreme climate events. WFP

Available Language: English
Type
Language
Format
Acquire
Original
SD PAL
Original
HD PAL
Original
HD NTSC
/
English
Other Formats
Description
STORY: WFP / CENTRAL AMERICA HUNGER
TRT: 04:14
SOURCE: WFP
RESTRICTIONS: PLEASE CREDIT WFP ON SCREEN
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / SPANISH / NATS

DATELINE: 18 FEBRUARY 2021, ROME, ITALY / 11-13 FEBRUARY 2021, HONDURAS / FILE

SHOTLIST:

13 FEBRUARY 2021, SANTA BARBARA, HONDURAS

1. Various shots, destruction caused by Hurricanes Eta and Iota as WFP team assesses the damage to houses on the banks of the River Ulúa

12 FEBRUARY 2021, SANTA BARBARA, HONDURAS

2. Various shots, Marlene Rosales and her children collecting trash and firewood from a garbage dump site.

11 FEBRUARY 2021, SANTA BARBARA, HONDURAS

3. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Marlene Rosales, Migrant:
“Before the pandemic, we had jobs. But with the pandemic, everything closed. We weren’t allowed to leave. The curfews started. Nobody could leave their home, so we couldn´t work anymore and we couldn’t bring any food home. After that, the hurricanes arrived.”

FILE - 18 NOVEMBER 2020, PIMIENTA, DEPARTMENT OF CORTÉS, HONDURAS

4. Various shots, damage and flooding from the River Ulúa, caused by Hurricanes Iota
5. Various shots, Honduran Red Cross using boats to evacuate people stranded by the flood

11 FEBRUARY 2021, SANTA BARBARA, HONDURAS

6. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Marlene Rosales, Migrant:
“Sometimes the children got sick and we didn’t have a cent. This is why we decided to leave. Because we wanted to finish the house, buy the children beds, find a good job, have a whole different life. But when we left, unfortunately, we couldn’t cross over.”

12 FEBRUARY 2021, SANTA BARBARA, HONDURAS

7. Various shots, Marlene collecting herbs
8. Various shots of Marlene’s home

11 FEBRUARY 2021, SANTA BARBARA, HONDURAS

9. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Marlene Rosales, Migrant:
“When there´s only enough food for them (children), it´s only for them. Even if we don´t eat. You know that, as parents, we prefer that children eat rather than us.”
10. Various shots, Marlene and her children unpack WFP food rations.

18 FEBRUARY 2021, ROME, ITALY

11. SOUNDBITE (English) Miguel Barreto, Regional Director, World Food Programme (WFP):
“According to our surveys, now 15 percent of the people are thinking to migrate. If we compare that figure with 2018; In 2018 it was just 8 percent and if we compare just one country like Honduras – in Honduras 17 percent of the people are thinking to migrate because of this crisis. So, WFP is ready to continue helping governments. We are planning to reach 2.6 million in 2021, and we need 46 million USD to cover that gap.”

12 FEBRUARY 2021, SANTA BARBARA, HONDURAS

12. Various shots, Marlene’s children eating food provided by WFP

STORYLINE:

Hunger in El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua has increased almost fourfold over the past two years - from 2.2 million people in 2018 to close to 8 million people in 2021 – a result of the economic crisis caused by COVID-19 and years of extreme climate events.

Of this figure, 1.7 million people are in the ‘Emergency’ category of food insecurity and require urgent food assistance.

Marlene and her husband lost their jobs during the pandemic and were forced to find work day to day while supplementing their diet by foraging for wild plants and roots. In November, when the hurricanes passed through, they lost their part time jobs as well. As a last resort they decided to join the migrant caravans but were blocked in Guatemala and forced to turn back. Now they make a living selling scrap metal and plastic bottles - They make US$0.08 for every two pounds of scrap metal.

SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Marlene Rosales, Migrant:
“Before the pandemic, we had jobs. But with the pandemic, everything closed. We weren’t allowed to leave. The curfews started. Nobody could leave their home, so we couldn´t work anymore and we couldn’t bring any food home. After that, the hurricanes arrived.”

With homes and farms destroyed, food stocks running low and job opportunities shrinking, nearly 15 percent of people surveyed by WFP in January 2021 said that they were making concrete plans to migrate. In a 2018 post-drought assessment only eight percent of respondents indicated they were planning to migrate.

SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Marlene Rosales, Migrant:
“Sometimes the children got sick and we didn’t have a cent. This is why we decided to leave. Because we wanted to finish the house, buy the children beds, find a good job, have a whole different life. But when we left, unfortunately, we couldn’t cross over.”

The record 2020 Atlantic hurricane season dealt a severe blow to millions who were previously relatively untouched by hunger, among them people dependent on the service economy, tourism and informal jobs. Hurricanes Eta and Iota that struck Central America in November 2020 upended the lives of 6.8 million people who lost their homes and livelihoods.

Marlene and her children collect “Yerba Mora” or Black Nightshade, which is not usually eaten but it is edible and used as a supplement to their diet in times of scarcity.

SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Marlene Rosales, Migrant:
“When there´s only enough food for them (children), it´s only for them. Even if we don´t eat. You know that, as parents, we prefer that children eat rather than us.”

Since November 2020, WFP has provided food assistance to 69,886 families in Honduras affected by Hurricanes Eta and Iota.

SOUNDBITE (English) Miguel Barreto, Regional Director, World Food Programme (WFP):
“According to our surveys, now 15 percent of the people are thinking to migrate. If we compare that figure with 2018; In 2018 it was just 8 percent and if we compare just one country like Honduras – in Honduras 17 percent of the people are thinking to migrate because of this crisis. So, WFP is ready to continue helping governments. We are planning to reach 2.6 million in 2021, and we need 46 million USD to cover that gap.”

The hurricanes destroyed over 200,000 hectares of staple food and cash crops in the four countries and more than 10,000 hectares of coffee farmland in Honduras and Nicaragua. The hurricanes struck as these communities were already dealing with job losses and a shrinking economy, a fallout of COVID-19.
WFP surveys estimate that food security in Central America nosedived as a result of COVID-19. The number of households that did not have enough to eat during COVID-19 nearly doubled in Guatemala compared to pre-pandemic numbers. In Honduras, it increased by more than 50 percent. An overwhelming majority of households in Honduras, Guatemala and El Salvador reported income losses or unemployment during the pandemic.

Communities in Central America have borne the brunt of a climate emergency, where consecutive years of drought and erratic weather have disrupted food production – especially staples like maize and beans, which depend heavily on regular rainfall.

WFP calls on the international community to support its efforts in Central America to provide urgent humanitarian assistance and to invest in long-term development projects and national social protection programmes that help vulnerable communities withstand recurrent weather extremes and economic shocks.

WFP plans to assist 2.6 million people in El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, and Nicaragua in 2021 and requires US$47.3 million over the next six months.
Series
Category
Topical Subjects
Geographic Subjects
Corporate Subjects
Creator
WFP
Alternate Title
unifeed210223b
Asset ID
2603792