VIETNAM / SMART FARMING

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22-Jan-2021 00:03:59
Smartphone technology is helping rice farmers save their harvests in Vietnam, as the International Fund for Agricultural Development warned that without immediate action to help small-scale farmers adapt to climate change the hunger and migration will increase globally. IFAD

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STORY: VIET NAM / SMART FARMING
TRT: 3:59
SOURCE: IFAD
RESTRICTIONS: ONE
LANGUAGE: VIETNAMESE /NATS

DATELINE: 20 DECEMBER 2020, TRA VINH PROVINCE VIET NAM

SHOTLIST:

FILE – VARIOUS LOCATIONS

1. Close up, mobile phone screen
2. Med shot, woman on phone
3. Med shot, boy taking selfie in Kenya
4. Med shot, man taking photo on phone in Bolivia
5. Med shot, man in video call in Cambodia
6. Wide shot, man talking on mobile in Kenya

FILE – 2014, VIET NAM

7. Close up, Buddhist monk on phone
8. Med shot, four Buddhist monks on river bank
9. Various shots, men in boats
10. Tracking shot, river
11. Aerial shot, flooded paddy fields
12. Various shots, floods

20 DECEMBER 2020, TRA VINH PROVINCE VIET NAM

13. Close up, man throwing seed
14. Wide shot, man throwing seed
15. Wide shot, canal
16. Wide shot, farmers harvesting rice
17. Various shots, people walking in field
18. Close up, water running down a drainage channel
19. SOUNDBITE (Vietnamese) Thach Thi Than, Farmer, Tra Vinh Province: “When saltwater intrudes, it affects the rice to the point that some farmers even have all of their fields die. For example, in the last crop, my family's rice was also lost. Usually, one hectare of rice per year can yield 15, 16 bags, but sometimes we only get 5, 6 bags. So, salinity is impacting us a lot.”
20. Med shot, man sitting on log at beach
21. Wide shot, man sitting on log at beach with sea in distance
22. Wide shot, person raking rice on floor
23. Pan left, scooping rice into bags
24. Close up, tying up top of bags
25. Zoom in, river
26. Aerial shot, flooded fields
27. Close up, mobile phone screen with map and dots
28. Various shots, young guy making equipment
29. Med shot, two people manufacturing in factory
30. Zoom in, RYNAN Smart sensor box
31. Wide shot, people around equipment in the field
32. Close up app map on mobile screen
33. SOUNDBITE Vietnamese) Huynh Nghia Tho, IFAD-AMD Project Director: ‘’Every 15 minutes, a water sample is taken and on the database of sensors, the data is transferred to the operation center and analyzed indicators such as salinity, alkalinity, PH and tidal water level to notify people through the Rynan Mekong application system.”
34. Wide shot, floating yellow sensor
35. Various shots, solar panel sensors in field
36. Aerial shot, people walking between flooded fields
37. Wide shot, people looking at water flowing out of pipe into field
38. Close up, water flowing out of pipe
39. Med shot, woman turning off water valve
40. Close up, woman’s hands turning off valve
41. SOUNDBITE (Vietnamese) Thach Thi Than, Farmer, Tra Vinh Province:
‘’In the past, if our parents or we wanted to know if the water was salty or not, we had to taste it like this to decide whether to get water into the field or not. But nowadays, we can stay at home and still be able to collect water information”
42. SOUNDBITE (Vietnamese) Nguyen Thi Lun, Deputy Director, Bureau for Plan Protection, Tra Vinh Department of Agriculture and Rural Development:
“This monitoring equipment to measure salinity helps people reduce the riskiest possibility of saline intrusion into the field, helping to protect farmers' productivity. “
43. Close up, mobile screen
44. Med shot, two men inspecting rice stalks
45. Close up, rice paddy
46. Wide shot, rice paddy with white flags
47. Aerial shot, rice paddy with white flags
48. Close up, hands fixing light to top of yellow pedestal
49. Various shots, workers install triangular solar panels to top of saline sensor
50. Close up, completing paperwork in front of saline sensor
51. Close of mobile phone displaying app information
52. Med shot, two men looking at the phone
53. Aerial shot, rice paddies, some flooded

STORYLINE:

The warning comes ahead of the Climate Adaptation Summit, which will be held online on 25-26 January, when IFAD will announce the launch of its USD 500 million Enhanced Adaptation for Smallholder Agriculture Programme (ASAP+) envisioned to be the largest fund dedicated to channeling climate finance to small-scale producers.

Currently only 1.7 percent of climate finance is channelled to small-scale farmers – a fraction of what is needed.

IFAD has been at the forefront of helping small rural farmers adapt to climate change. In Vietnam, smartphone technology is helping rice farmers save their harvests.

Across the world billions of people are using their smartphones for surfing, selfies and social media. But here in the Mekong delta they’re using them to tackle the changing weather.
Vietnam is a country that has been hit hard by climate change.

Heavier rainfall and rising temperatures have increased the risk of floods, typhoons and droughts. The low-lying Mekong Delta -which produces more than half the country’s rice -has been badly affected. Rising sea levels have seen saltwater leaching into paddy fields severely damaging crops.

SOUNDBITE (Vietnamese) Thach Thi Than, Farmer, Tra Vinh Province: “When saltwater intrudes, it affects the rice to the point that some farmers even have all of their fields die. For example, in the last crop, my family's rice was also lost. Usually, one hectare of rice per year can yield 15, 16 bags, but sometimes we only get 5, 6 bags. So, salinity is impacting us a lot.”

The Vietnam government estimates drought and salinity will affect more than three hundred and fifty thousand hectares of rice this year. The impact is devastating to paddy rice farmers who are getting only one harvest a year rather than three. The huge drop in production is driving more farmers into hunger and poverty and seeing a dramatic reduction in rice entering the food chain.

The International Fund for Agricultural Development or IFAD is helping farmers using smartphones and sensors as an early warning system to detect the salt before it can do any damage.

Sensors have been placed in Thach Thi’s paddy fields and in neighbouring farmer’s fields and the results are monitored, recorded and sent onto the farmers using a simple smartphone app.

SOUNDBITE Vietnamese) Huynh Nghia Tho, IFAD-AMD Project Director: ‘’Every 15 minutes, a water sample is taken and on the database of sensors, the data is transferred to the operation center and analyzed indicators such as salinity, alkalinity, PH and tidal water level to notify people through the Rynan Mekong application system.”

These instant alerts have given farmers early warnings of increasing saline levels so that they can act more quickly to save their crops.

SOUNDBITE (Vietnamese) Thach Thi Than, Farmer, Tra Vinh Province:
‘’In the past, if our parents or we wanted to know if the water was salty or not, we had to taste it like this to decide whether to get water into the field or not. But nowadays, we can stay at home and still be able to collect water information”

SOUNDBITE (Vietnamese) Nguyen Thi Lun, Deputy Director, Bureau for Plan Protection, Tra Vinh Department of Agriculture and Rural Development:
“This monitoring equipment to measure salinity helps people reduce the riskiest possibility of saline intrusion into the field, helping to protect farmers' productivity. “

The saline early warning system has had some dramatic results, with a damage from salinity lowering to a tenth of the damage compared to the last time the fields were affected by salty water.

IFAD’s new climate adaptation programme ASAP + aims to raise USD 500 million to help at least 10 million farmers like these to have the tools they need to adapt to climate change so that they can stay on their land and continue to earn a living growing the food for their communities.
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Geographic Subjects
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IFAD
Alternate Title
unifeed210122c
Asset ID
2598744