UN / SYRIA

Preview Language:   Original
20-Jan-2021 00:03:03
UN Special Envoy for Syria Geir O. Pedersen today said, “the political process is not as yet delivering real changes in Syrian’s lives nor a real vision for the future. Steps that could build confidence are not really being taken.” UNIFEED

Available Language: English
Type
Language
Format
Acquire
/
English
Other Formats
Description
STORY: UN / SYRIA
TRT: 3:03
SOURCE: UNIFEED
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 20 JANUARY 2021, NEW YORK CITY / FILE

SHOTLIST:

RECENT – NEW YORK CITY

1.Wide shot, exterior, United Nations Headquarters

20 JANUARY 2021, NEW YORK CITY

2.Multiscreen
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Geir O. Pedersen, Special Envoy for Syria, United Nations:
“The political process is not as yet delivering real changes in Syrian’s lives nor a real vision for the future. Steps that could build confidence are not really being taken.”
4.Multiscreen
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Geir O. Pedersen, Special Envoy for Syria, United Nations:
“As I continue to take stock of the implementation of resolution 2254, it is clear that no one actor or group of actors can impose their will on Syria or settle the conflict. They must work together. Yes, the process must be Syrian-owned and led. But the conflict is highly internationalized, with five foreign armies active in Syria. We cannot pretend that the solutions are only in the hands of the Syrians, or that the UN can do it alone.”
6. Multiscreen
7. SOUNDBITE (English) Geir O. Pedersen, Special Envoy for Syria, United Nations:
“I am more convinced than ever that we need a comprehensive approach – inclusive of all issues, and all actors, moving in mutual and reciprocal steps on all the issues outlined in resolution 2254. This could unlock genuine progress, and could chart a safe and secure path out of this crisis for all Syrians – men and women. I continue to engage widely on this front, with all key actors. I look forward to continuing to do so - including of course with the new US Administration that takes office today.”
8. Multiscreen
9. SOUNDBITE (English) Mark Lowcock, Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs and Emergency Relief Coordinator and the Head of the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA):
“Mr. President, we have told you before of our concern that many vulnerable families would not be sufficiently prepared for winter this year. Unfortunately, those concerns are proving justified. As a result of heavy rainfall affecting thousands of people in the north-west this week, people are telling us that they, their children and their elderly parents are spending whole nights standing upright in their tents because they are inundated with so much water.”
10. Multimedia
11. SOUNDBITE (English) Mark Lowcock, Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs and Emergency Relief Coordinator and the Head of the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA):
“Compounding the economic crisis is the impact of COVID. While testing remains too limited to convey the true extent of the outbreak, there are indications that Syria may be experiencing a renewed wave of infections. Cases reported in Government areas increased by 64 per cent between November and December. More than 50 per cent of tests are coming back positive in Sweida and Tartous; in Homs it is 60 per cent. Survey data in December revealed 45 per cent of households as having lost one or more sources of income over the previous month because of restrictions related to COVID.”
12. Multimedia

STORYLINE:

UN Special Envoy for Syria Geir O. Pedersen today said, “the political process is not as yet delivering real changes in Syrian’s lives nor a real vision for the future. Steps that could build confidence are not really being taken.”

Addressing the Security Council today (20 Jan) via video link, the Special Envoy said that the Syrian people have seen less all-out violence than before. The last 10 months have been the calmest in the history of the conflict. Frontlines have barely shifted. But this is a fragile calm.

Pedersen also stated that he continues to take stock of the implementation of resolution 2254, “it is clear that no one actor or group of actors can impose their will on Syria or settle the conflict.”

He added, “they must work together. Yes, the process must be Syrian-owned and led. But the conflict is highly internationalized, with five foreign armies active in Syria. We cannot pretend that the solutions are only in the hands of the Syrians, or that the UN can do it alone.”
The Special Envoy also said, “I am more convinced than ever that we need a comprehensive approach – inclusive of all issues, and all actors, moving in mutual and reciprocal steps on all the issues outlined in resolution 2254.”

He continued, “this could unlock genuine progress, and could chart a safe and secure path out of this crisis for all Syrians – men and women, adding that he continues to “engage widely on this front, with all key actors. I look forward to continuing to do so - including of course with the new US Administration that takes office today.”

On the humanitarian front, UN humanitarian chief Mark Lowcock told the Council that it concerns him that “many vulnerable families would not be sufficiently prepared for winter this year.”

He said, “unfortunately, those concerns are proving justified. As a result of heavy rainfall affecting thousands of people in the north-west this week, people are telling us that they, their children and their elderly parents are spending whole nights standing upright in their tents because they are inundated with so much water.”

On the economic crisis impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic, Lowcock said, “while testing remains too limited to convey the true extent of the outbreak, there are indications that Syria may be experiencing a renewed wave of infections.”

He stated, “cases reported in Government areas increased by 64 per cent between November and December. More than 50 per cent of tests are coming back positive in Sweida and Tartous; in Homs it is 60 per cent.”

The humanitarian chief continued, “survey data in December revealed 45 per cent of households as having lost one or more sources of income over the previous month because of restrictions related to COVID.”

Lowcock also said that the UN will continue to use every opportunity to deliver aid to those most in need, adding that it will require adequate funding, improved access, and an end to the violence that has tormented Syrians for nearly a decade.
Series
Category
Geographic Subjects
Creator
UNIFEED
Alternate Title
unifeed210120b
Asset ID
2598159