SOUTH SUDAN / RADIO GENDER BASED VIOLENCE

Preview Language:   Original
17-Dec-2020 00:03:02
Communities of Northern Bahr-el-Ghazal, in the North West of South Sudan have been sensitized on how to report incidents of sexual harassment, abuse and violence against women. This happened during a radio discussion sponsored by the United Nations Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS), having perceived the crucial role that media can play in ending gender-based violence. UNMISS

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Description
STORY: SOUTH SUDAN / RADIO GENDER BASED VIOLENCE
TRT: 3:02
SOURCE: UNMISS
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 08 DECEMBER 2020, NORTHERN-BAHR-EL-GHAZAL SOUTH SUDAN


SHOTLIST:

08 DECEMBER 2020, NORTHERN-BAHR-EL-GHAZAL SOUTH SUDAN

1. Wide shot, radio show discussion in studio
2. SOUNDBITE (English) Maria Angelo, Aweil resident:
“It’s our role as young people to identify and understand who we are, no matter what the culture bring on us. Because if you look at our culture girls need to get married so that our family will receive cows. But cows should not be the first priority. We need to go to school and study. We need to acquire quality education, so that we change our community, so that we bring development.”
3. Med shot, radio show discussion in studio
4. SOUNDBITE (English) Joseph Adoung, Youth Ambassador:
“This is very important, and I hope our community will respond; to listen, to pay their time to listen to the radio and help us to eliminate the gender-based violence directed to the women and girls in the country and the state, and the community at large.”
5. Various shots, inside radio studio
6. SOUNDBITE (English) Rebecca Abour, Former Minister of Child Welfare and Social Development, South Sudan:
“The role of media is great in fighting GBV (gender-based violence). It has been translated to the local languages. Those who can get communicated with the local radios, we have the local radios in the location. So, the messages are being passed. And the Government of South Sudan also plays a great role, put 35 percentage, which allowed women to patriciate. So, indication also it helped. Those are the tools which support the media.”
7. Med shot, radio discussion in studio
8. SOUNDBITE (English Mariama Dauda, Civil Affairs Officer, United Nations Mission in South Sudan:
“This year in commemoration of sixteen days of activism, we decided to host radio talk shows verses the usual gathering of the community and disseminating the messages through principle speech in the community. It turns out to be well received because, first of all, we did it in the local language broadening the outreach, and also co-acting and going into collaboration with local radios because radio Miraya is not everywhere.”
9. Wide shot, woman in radio studio

STORYLINE:

Communities of Northern Bahr-el-Ghazal, in the North West of South Sudan have been sensitized on how to report incidents of sexual harassment, abuse and violence against women. This happened during a radio discussion sponsored by the United Nations Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS), having perceived the crucial role that media can play in ending gender-based violence.

Participating youth are optimistic that the media has a role to play in breaking the silence on taboos like rape and other forms of sexual abuse. Sensitive issues such as early and forced marriages are also included.

SOUNDBITE (English) Maria Angelo, Aweil resident:
“It’s our role as young people to identify and understand who we are, no matter what the culture brings on us. Because if you look at our culture girls need to get married so that our family will receive cows. But cows should not be the first priority. We need to go to school and study. We need to acquire quality education, so that we change our community, so that we bring development.”

Three community radio stations with the greatest reach and number of listeners in Northern Bahr-el-Ghazal State - Akol Yam, Weerbei, and Nhomlaau – are powerful vehicles of important information in the region. They have been educating communities, which is necessary to help eradicate violence against women. Education on these issues can happen during discussions held on different media platforms.

SOUNDBITE (English) Joseph Adoung, Youth Ambassador:
“This is very important, and I hope our community will respond; to listen, to pay their time to listen to the radio and help us to eliminate the gender-based violence directed to the women and girls in the country and the state, and the community at large.”

Local media has been considered important when it comes to fighting these alarmingly common issues, raising awareness through messages on ending violence against women, which have been translated into local languages so as to maximize their reach and impact.

SOUNDBITE (English) Rebecca Abour, Former Minister of Child Welfare and Social Development, South Sudan:
“The role of media is great in fighting GBV (gender-based violence). It has been translated to the local languages. Those who can get communicated with the local radios, we have the local radios in the location. So, the messages are being passed. And the Government of South Sudan also plays a great role, put 35 percentage, which allowed women to patriciate. So, indication also it helped. Those are the tools which support the media.”

Mariama Dauda, a Civil Affairs Officer serving with the United Nations Mission in South Sudan, highlighted the importance of radio programmes to reach audiences in faraway places who may have no other chance of receiving such information.

SOUNDBITE (English Mariama Dauda, Civil Affairs Officer, United Nations Mission in South Sudan:
“This year in commemoration of sixteen days of activism, we decided to host radio talk shows verses the usual gathering of the community and disseminating the messages through principle speech in the community. It turns out to be well received because, first of all, we did it in the local language broadening the outreach, and also co-acting and going into collaboration with local radios because radio Miraya is not everywhere.”

These live radio shows like these are a valuable asset in spreading the word, particularly as the COVID-19 pandemic rages on, as many cannot attend workshops or read written material on how to prevent gender-based violence.
Series
Category
Geographic Subjects
Creator
UNMISS
Alternate Title
unifeed201217b
Asset ID
2594009