MAURITANIA / MALIAN REFUGEE CONSTRUCTOR

Preview Language:   Original
13-Jul-2020 00:01:09
Through a UNHCR job training programme, Farka Ould Hassen, a Malian father of twelve children sheltering in Mauritania since 2012, has obtained skills in construction, enabling him to help support his family and prepare for a return home. UNHCR

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Description
STORY: MAURITANIA / MALIAN REFUGEE CONSTRUCTOR
TRT: 1:09
SOURCE: UNHCR
RESTRICTIONS: PLEASE CREDIT UNHCR ON SCREEN
LANGUAGE: HASANYI /NATS

DATELINE: 1 FEBRUARY 2020, MBERA REFUGEE CAMP, MAURITANIA

SHOTLIST:

1. Wide shot, Farka carrying roll of wire fencing
2. UPSOUND (Hasanyi) Farka Ould Hassen, Malian refugee in Mauritania:
“When I start with the wire, I do it like this.”
3. Various shots, Farka making fence
4. SOUNDBITE (Hasanyi) Farka Ould Hassen, Malian refugee in Mauritania:
“I am blessed to have so many children, but they are weak, very weak. And we are poor.”
5. Med shot, Farka working on fence
6. SOUNDBITE (Hasanyi) Farka Ould Hassen, Malian refugee in Mauritania:
“Of course I want to go home to Mali. And I’m going to use what I’ve learned in my own fields.”
7. Wide shot, expo of artisanal products made by refugees
8. Med shot, jewelry on display
9. Pan left, women dancing

STORYLINE:

Through a UNHCR job training programme, Farka Ould Hassen, a Malian father of twelve children sheltering in Mauritania since 2012, has obtained skills in construction, enabling him to help support his family and prepare for a return home.

Farka, 46, was a farmer in Niafunké, a village on the Niger river near Timbuktu, in central Mali. There he grew rice, millet and vegetables and raised goats and sheep. He provided for his family, including two wives and 12 children. But in 2012, at the start of the uprising by Islamist and rebel groups in the north of Mali, he fled along with his whole family. Many of the nearly 60,000 Malian refugees who made it across the border into Mauritania have been there since the beginning of the conflict, and insecurity has kept them here.

Like Farka, most Malian refugees in Mauritania live in and around the Mbera refugee camp close to the border. The camp, located in a harsh desert environment of the Hodh Ecchargui region, is managed by UNHCR in cooperation with aid partners and the Mauritanian authorities. Farka was in a group of 15 people in a training programme, carried out by UNHCR’s implementing partner COOPI, to make wire fencing.

UNHCR and the International Labor Organization, with the support of the European Union, the United States and Japan, have also begun a vocational training school for construction (Ecole Chantier) in Mbera, offering training and employment to refugees and members of the host communities, both men and women.

Participants have built the school’s own buildings and are in the process of building a school extension and an asphalt road. Some 200 youth have been trained in plumbing, bricklaying, formwork, and renewable energy so far. In addition to helping break down gender stereotypes, the project offers them the prospect of building marketable skills and contributing to the local economy. In line with the Global Compact on Refugees, Mauritania has committed to ensuring refugees have same conditions of access to labour market as nationals.
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UNHCR
Alternate Title
unifeed200713d
Asset ID
2550537