UN / RYDER LABOUR COVID-19

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30-Jun-2020 00:02:45
The number of working hours lost across the world in the first half of 2020 was significantly worse than previously estimated, while the highly uncertain recovery in the second half of the year will not be enough to go back to pre-pandemic levels, even in the best scenario, and risks seeing continuing large-scale job losses, warns the International Labour Organization (ILO). ILO

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STORY: ILO / RYDER LABOUR COVID-19
TRT: 02:45
SOURCE: ILO
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 30 JUNE 2020, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND

SHOTLIST:

1. Wide shot, dais
2. SOUNDBITE (English) Guy Ryder, Director-General, International Labour Organization (ILO):
“But I think the first piece of news, and it's a bad piece of news, is that the situation is worse than we had previously estimated for the first half of this year which is now coming to an end. Our latest estimate is for the loss of the equivalent of 400 million full time jobs. That's up from 305 million in our estimate of one months ago. And this reflects the fact that the pandemic is really hitting hard, particularly in the Americas, in the developing world in general but in the Americas.”
3. Wide shot, dais
4. SOUNDBITE (English) Guy Ryder, Director-General, International Labour Organization (ILO):
even the best scenarios, none of them takes us back to the situation where we started the year. There will be considerable loss of jobs and employment through to the end of this year and that's really a worry.”
5. Wide shot, dais
6. SOUNDBITE (English) Guy Ryder, Director-General, International Labour Organization (ILO):
“We take a particular look at the situation of women. Perhaps counterintuitively, most times when you get a downturn in the economy, women don't suffer as much as men. Men get shaken out of the labor market more quickly because they tend to work in in sectors which are closely linked to the economic cycle. It’s different this time. Women are concentrated in the sectors which have been most hit by the pandemic. They're very heavily represented in domestic work, in the frontline health and social care sectors, and this burden of unpaid care which is always the prerogative of women has been intensified by the pandemic. So, we run the risk of losing the albeit modest gains in gender equality that we've recorded in recent years.”
7. Wide shot, dais
8. SOUNDBITE (English) Guy Ryder, Director-General, International Labour Organization (ILO):
“So how do we sequence and balance the health and the social economic policy responses to the pandemic? How do we sustain the enormous effort of stimulus that the world has put in up until this point as debt begins to rise? How do we do better in international cooperation? Because, at the risk of exaggerating, each country has looked after itself so far. We need to help those who are least able to bring the resources to bear. How do you make sure that Social Dialogue and respect of rights is taken seriously in all of this? And finally, how do we build back better? How do we create that better future of work? A fairer one where the vulnerable and the hardest hit are given priority attention. That was the aim of our centenary and the Future of Work initiative. It mustn't get swept away by this pandemic. In fact, it's needed more than ever because of this pandemic.”
9. Wide shot, dais

STORYLINE:
The number of working hours lost across the world in the first half of 2020 was significantly worse than previously estimated, while the highly uncertain recovery in the second half of the year will not be enough to go back to pre-pandemic levels, even in the best scenario, and risks seeing continuing large-scale job losses, warns the International Labour Organization (ILO).

ILO’s Director-General Guy Ryder said “the situation is worse than we had previously estimated for the first half of this year which is now coming to an end. Our latest estimate is for the loss of the equivalent of 400 million full time jobs. That's up from 305 million in our estimate of one months ago. And this reflects the fact that the pandemic is really hitting hard, particularly in the Americas, in the developing world in general but in the Americas.”

Ryder said, “even the best scenarios, none of them takes us back to the situation where we started the year. There will be considerable loss of jobs and employment through to the end of this year and that's really a worry.”

The ILO Director-General said, “most times when you get a downturn in the economy, women don't suffer as much as men. Men get shaken out of the labor market more quickly because they tend to work in in sectors which are closely linked to the economic cycle. It’s different this time. Women are concentrated in the sectors which have been most hit by the pandemic. They're very heavily represented in domestic work, in the frontline health and social care sectors, and this burden of unpaid care which is always the prerogative of women has been intensified by the pandemic. So, we run the risk of losing the albeit modest gains in gender equality that we've recorded in recent years.”

Ryder said, “how do we sequence and balance the health and the social economic policy responses to the pandemic? How do we sustain the enormous effort of stimulus that the world has put in up until this point as debt begins to rise? How do we do better in international cooperation? Because, at the risk of exaggerating, each country has looked after itself so far. We need to help those who are least able to bring the resources to bear. How do you make sure that Social Dialogue and respect of rights is taken seriously in all of this? And finally, how do we build back better? How do we create that better future of work? A fairer one where the vulnerable and the hardest hit are given priority attention. That was the aim of our centenary and the Future of Work initiative. It mustn't get swept away by this pandemic. In fact, it's needed more than ever because of this pandemic.”

According to the ILO Monitor: COVID-19 and the world of work: 5th Edition, there was a 14 per cent drop in global working hours during the second quarter of 2020, equivalent to the loss of 400 million full-time jobs (based on a 48-hour working week). This is a sharp increase on the previous Monitor’s estimate (issued on May 27), of a 10.7 per cent drop (305 million jobs).
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