WHO / COVID-19 WOMEN CHILDREN ADOLESCENTS

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12-Jun-2020 00:04:14
WHO’s Director-General, Tedros Ghebreyesus, expressed concern about the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic “on people who already struggle to access health services, often women, children and adolescents.” WHO

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STORY: WHO / COVID-19 WOMEN CHILDREN ADOLESCENTS
TRT: 04:14
SOURCE: WHO
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LANGUAGES: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 12 JUNE 2020, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND / FILE

SHOTLIST:

FILE - GENEVA, SWITZERLAND

1. Various shots, WHO Headquarters exterior

12 JUNE 2020, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND

2. Wide shot, dais
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Tedros Ghebreyesus, Director-General, World Health Organization (WHO):
"As the pandemic accelerates in low and middle-income countries, WHO is especially concerned about its impact on people who already struggle to access health services, often women, children and adolescents. The indirect effects of COVID-19 on these groups may be greater than the number of deaths due to the virus itself. Because the pandemic has overwhelmed health systems in many places, women may have a heightened risk of dying from complications of pregnancy and childbirth."
4. Wide shot, dais
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Natalia Kanem, Executive Director, United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA):
"Pregnancies don't stop for the pandemic, sexual and reproductive health services are not just nice to have, they are essential. Even before the emergence of COVID-19 for millions of women, timely high quality maternal health care was unavailable, it was inaccessible, or it was not affordable. And now with the pandemic, we'seeing exacerbation of already limited access to care, putting women's health and lives at risk."
6. Wide shot dais
7. SOUNDBITE (English) Natalia Kanem, Executive Director, United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA):
“With COVID-19 affecting health systems, many pregnant women are being cut off from reproductive health care. Many thousands could die from preventable complications of pregnancy and childbirth."
8. Wide shot, dais
9. SOUNDBITE (English) Tedros Ghebreyesus, Director-General, World Health Organization (WHO):
“We know that children are at relatively low-risk of COVID-19 but are at high risk of numerous other diseases and conditions that breastfeeding prevents. Based on the available evidence, WHO’s advice is that the benefits of breastfeeding outweigh any potential risks of transmission of COVID-19. Mothers with suspected or confirmed COVID-19 should be encouraged to initiate and continue breastfeeding and not be separated from their infants, unless the mother is too unwell.”
10. Wide shot, dais
11. SOUNDBITE (English) Anshu Banerjee, Director, Maternal, Newborn, Child and Adolescent Health and Ageing, World Health Organization (WHO):
"So far, we have not been able to detect live virus in breast milk. So, several cases have been identified where there have been RNA fragments or fragments of the virus in breast milk, but we haven't actually identified live virus in breast milk. And so, the risk of transmission from mother to child, therefore, so far has not been established.”
12. Wide shot dais
13. SOUNDBITE (English) Michael Ryan, Executive Director, Health Emergencies Programme, World Health Organization (WHO):
“The current uptick in cases in some countries can be represented, yes, as a second wave or a second peak. In other words, that the disease has not reached a very low level, maintained a low level and then come back sometime later in the year, this is possibly in some countries related to a reopening of society, remixing of people, and being in a situation without adequate social distancing without adequate, measures in place.”
14. Wide shot, dais
15. SOUNDBITE (English) Michael Ryan, Executive Director, Health Emergencies Programme, World Health Organization (WHO):
"So, it's not surprising at all that any country coming out of a so-called lockdown can have clusters of disease, reemergence of disease and clusters. That's not necessarily a second wave, that is just, a result of, many of you, as journalists have asked us, there is a careful balance to be struck between keeping everyone at home and continuing to completely suppress transmission of COVID-19 and the untoward effects of that on the economy and society. And that's not an easy balance. This is a public health dilemma, and it's one that has to be carefully managed and balanced by every government every minute of every day. And there are no correct answers in that regard."
16. Wide shot, dais

STORYLINE:

WHO’s Director-General, Tedros Ghebreyesus, today (12 Jun) expressed concern about the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic “on people who already struggle to access health services, often women, children and adolescents.”

Dr. Tedros said, “the indirect effects of COVID-19 on these groups may be greater than the number of deaths due to the virus itself” He said that as the pandemic has overwhelmed health systems, “women may have a heightened risk of dying from complications of pregnancy and childbirth."

Joining Dr. Tedros, the Executive Director of the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) said, “pregnancies don't stop for the pandemic, sexual and reproductive health services are not just nice to have, they are essential. Even before the emergence of COVID-19 for millions of women, timely high quality maternal health care was unavailable, it was inaccessible, or it was not affordable. And now with the pandemic, we'seeing exacerbation of already limited access to care, putting women's health and lives at risk."

She stressed that as COVID-19 affects health systems, “many pregnant women are being cut off from reproductive health care” and “many thousands could die from preventable complications of pregnancy and childbirth."

Dr. Tedros said children “are at relatively low-risk of COVID-19 but are at high risk of numerous other diseases and conditions that breastfeeding prevents.”

He said that based on available evidence, “WHO’s advice is that the benefits of breastfeeding outweigh any potential risks of transmission of COVID-19” and “others with suspected or confirmed COVID-19 should be encouraged to initiate and continue breastfeeding and not be separated from their infants, unless the mother is too unwell.”

WHO’s Director of Maternal, Newborn, Child and Adolescent Health and Ageing, Anshu Banerjee, said, "so far, we have not been able to detect live virus in breast milk. So, several cases have been identified where there have been RNA fragments or fragments of the virus in breast milk, but we haven't actually identified live virus in breast milk. And so, the risk of transmission from mother to child, therefore, so far has not been established.”


For his part, WHO’s Executive Director of its Health Emergencies Programme, Michael Ryan, said, a second wave of infections “is possibly in some countries related to a reopening of society, remixing of people, and being in a situation without adequate social distancing without adequate, measures in place.”

He said, “it's not surprising at all that any country coming out of a so-called lockdown can have clusters of disease, reemergence of disease and clusters. That's not necessarily a second wave, that is just, a result of, many of you, as journalists have asked us, there is a careful balance to be struck between keeping everyone at home and continuing to completely suppress transmission of COVID-19 and the untoward effects of that on the economy and society. And that's not an easy balance. This is a public health dilemma, and it's one that has to be carefully managed and balanced by every government every minute of every day. And there are no correct answers in that regard."

According to the WHO’s latest situation report, there are now globally 7,410,510 confirmed cases and 418,294 confirmed deaths.
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