ILO / COVID-19 YOUTH EMPLOYMENT

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27-May-2020 00:02:38
Almost one in six young people have stopped working since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic while those who remain employed have seen their working hours cut by 23 per cent, says the International Labour Organization. ILO

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STORY: ILO / COVID-19 YOUTH EMPLOYMENT
TRT: 2:38
SOURCE: ILO
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH /NATS

DATELINE: 27 MAY 2020, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND

SHOTLIST :

1. Med shot, Ryder and colleague on the podium
2. Close up, colleague
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Guy Ryder, Director-General, International Labour Organization (ILO):
“I think there are three messages that we're giving out in this monitor. The first is that our global estimates for the employment impact of the pandemic is 305 million. It's the same figure we gave out last time. So, I think we can see that we have a clear idea of what the overall job price has been of the pandemic.”
4. Med shot, Ryder and colleague on the podium
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Guy Ryder, Director-General, International Labour Organization (ILO):
“But then we're looking very specifically, and this is the second message, at the situation of young people and it's hardly a surprise. We see that young people have been the hardest and the quickest hit on the labor market. Starting already from a very bad place on labor markets, we've seen that no less than 1 in 6, slightly more than 1 in 6 young people who were in work at the beginning of the pandemic are no longer working. This is a dramatic situation but there are two more things affecting young people. One is the interruption of their education and training. We have seen this has happened on a very large scale to such an extent that 50 percent of young people don't know when they'll be able to complete their training. 10 percent think that they will never complete their training. So, this is a second hit on young people. And the third of course, is that in this always difficult entry to the labor market at the end of education for many young people, there's nowhere to go in a locked down economy. So, the danger is if you put these three things together, that we are creating a lockdown generation of young people who might face permanent, or at least long-term consequences, for this dramatic situation.”
6. Med shot, Ryder and colleague on the podium
7. SOUNDBITE (English) Guy Ryder, Director-General, International Labour Organization (ILO):
“And the last message is about testing and tracing. The World Health Organization insists very strongly, for good medical reasons, that we need to really focus on testing and tracing those who are affected by COVID-19. What we show in our monitor is that when you do that testing and tracing you get a positive impact on the labor market. That is to say, the loss of jobs is limited if you do more testing and tracing. Why? Because you can then rely less on lockdowns you give people more confidence as consumers, investors, and entrepreneurs. And thirdly of course, it's easier to come back to work, you can do this with greater knowledge, so you can get started that much more easily.”
8. Med shot, Ryder and colleague on the podium

STORYLINE:

Almost one in six young people have stopped working since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic while those who remain employed have seen their working hours cut by 23 per cent, says the International Labour Organization (ILO)

According to the ILO Monitor: COVID-19 and the world of work: 4th edition, youth are being disproportionately affected by the pandemic, and the substantial and rapid increase in youth unemployment seen since February is affecting young women more than young men.

The pandemic is inflicting a triple shock on young people. Not only is it destroying their employment, but it is also disrupting education and training, and placing major obstacles in the way of those seeking to enter the labour market or to move between jobs.

“The danger is if you put these three things together, that we are creating a lockdown generation of young people who might face permanent, or at least long-term consequences, for this dramatic situation,” said ILO’s Director-General Guy Ryder.

At 13.6 per cent, the youth unemployment rate in 2019 was already higher than for any other group. There were around 267 million young people not in employment, education or training (NEET) worldwide. Those 15-24-year old’s who were employed were also more likely to be in forms of work that leave them vulnerable, such as low paid occupations, informal sector work, or as migrant workers.
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2546578