SOUTH SUDAN / MARKET BORDERS CLOSURE

Preview Language:   Original
01-Apr-2020 00:02:21
A weekly market at Sakure, along the border between South Sudan and the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) is closed as the South Sudanese Government’s effort to mitigate the global threat posed by COVID-19. UNMISS

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STORY: SOUTH SUDAN / MARKET BORDERS CLOSURE
TRT: 02:21
SOURCE: UNMISS
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGES: ARABIC / ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 1 APRIL 2020, SAKURE, SOUTH SUDAN

SHOTLIST:

1.Various shots, traders at Sakure weekly border market.
2.Various shots, UNMISS team talking to locals at the border market.
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Venasio Sinoyosa, Clinical Officer, Sakure Primary Health Care Center:
“When it comes to the coronavirus, if it reaches us, I’m sure most people will be affected because right now there is no screening here. We have screening only for Ebola. Maybe it will start later; we are not sure. The border is closed, yes; [but] there are many panya [small] roads where people can flock and go to Congo, the Congolese also come here.”
4.Various shots, traders at Sakure weekly border market.
5.SOUNDBITE (Arabic) George Bol, South Sudanese Trader:
“I come here every Friday with salt and soap sell to the Congolese. I use the money to buy flour, oil and rice which I take home for my children. This has been my routine every week but now it is going to be harder for me to feed my family. Right now, I don’t have anything at home. I was hoping to find a few things here today.
6.Various shots, traders at Sakure weekly border market.
7.SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Lilian Sundry, South Sudanese Trader:
“It is really affecting us because we are dependent on this market. I always come here to buy palm oil and sell it in our village. This has been helping me. But now with this sickness, there is nothing we can do. I have to go home and take care of my children.”
8.Various shots, traders at Sakure weekly border market

STORYLINE:

A weekly market at Sakure, along the border between South Sudan and the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) is closed as the South Sudanese Government’s effort to mitigate the global threat posed by COVID-19.

The market used to be busy every Friday with traders from both countries meeting and exchanging goods. However, the government of South Sudan recently announced the closure of borders with neighboring countries. This resulted in the market closing down as well.

A team from the UN Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS) visited the area to assess the security and human rights situation in the area and monitor the return and reintegration of displaced persons as well as commercial activities at the border.

The traders are feeling the impact of the risks posed by the virus and the closure of the porous borders in an attempt to prevent it arriving in the country which is already struggling to recover from the five-year civil war.

SOUNDBITE (English) Venasio Sinoyosa, Clinical Officer, Sakure Primary Health Care Center:
“When it comes to the coronavirus, if it reaches us, I’m sure most people will be affected because right now there is no screening here. We have screening only for Ebola. Maybe it [the screening] will start later; we are not sure. The border is closed, yes; [but] there are many panya [small] roads where people can flock and go to Congo; the Congolese also come here.”

Most communities around this border area are dependent on this weekly market so the traders are suffering as a result of its closure.

SOUNDBITE (Arabic) George Bol, South Sudanese Trader:
“I come here every Friday with salt and soap sell to the Congolese. I use the money to buy flour, oil and rice which I take home for my children. This has been my routine every week but now it is going to be harder for me to feed my family. Right now, I don’t have anything at home. I was hoping to find a few things here today.

Lilian Sundry, too, is heading back home empty-handed, though she says she is happy to have time to take care of her children.

SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Lilian Sundry, South Sudanese Trader:
“It is really affecting us because we are dependent on this market. I always come here to buy palm oil and sell it in our village. This has been helping me. But now with this sickness, there is nothing we can do. I have to go home and take care of my children.”

South Sudan is currently one of the few countries in Africa without any recorded cases of COVID-19.
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Creator
UNMISS
Alternate Title
unifeed200401d
Asset ID
2542308