SOMALIA / LOCUST CONTROL

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16-Mar-2020 00:03:10
The Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) said it was working together with the Ministry of Agricultural Development of Somaliland to curb the spread of desert locusts through control operations with the use of biopesticide and surveillance efforts with an innovative tool called eLocust3. FAO

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STORY: SOMALIA / LOCUST CONTROL
TRT: 3:10
SOURCE: FAO
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 5 FEBRUARY 2020 / 5 MARCH 2020, GAROWE, SOMALIA / LUGHAYE DISTRICT, SOMALILAND

SHOTLIST:

5 FEBRUARY 2020, GAROWE, SOMALIA

1. Various shots, hopper bands jumping through the stones
2. Close up, a hopper on a stone.

5 MARCH 2020, OUTSKIRTS OF GEERISA TOWN, LUGHAYE DISTRICT, SOMALILAND

3. Various shots, workers in protective gears spraying biopesticide during the control operations carried out by the Plant Protection Department of the Ministry of Agricultural Development of Somaliland
4. Close up, a desert locust being held by a hand in glove
5. Various shots, hopper bands on tree, bushes and ground
6. Wide shot, a worker standing next to a vehicle with mounted sprayer
7. Various shots, vehicle with mounted sprayer spraying biopesticide
8. Wide shot, desert locust swarm flying in the fiend
9. Wide shot, people in the field

5 MARCH 2020, GEERISA TOWN, LUGHAYE DISTRICT, SOMALILAND

10. SOUNDBITE (English) Mohamed Mohamoud, Director, Plant Protection Department, Ministry of Agriculture of Somaliland:
“We prefer to use this biopesticide for safety to the animal, we have many livestock in Somaliland here, and also this biopesticdes is friendly to the environment and also it is safe to the people- people in the area of the community and also for the staff that is spraying this biopesticide.”
11. SOUNDBITE (English) Mohamed Mohamoud, Director, Plant Protection Department, Ministry of Agriculture of Somaliland:
“(Referring to the eLocust3 technology) This tablet is very very important because, I think, it works with the satellite and when you send the report by it, it sent directly what time when you conduct the control or survey, it goes to the Rome ( FAO’s headquarters) it sent and also to the region, the locust office. So it’s very important. And also it has many important information inside about the desert locusts.”
12. Various shots, Mohamed Mohamoud using the tablet

STORYLINE:

The Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) said it was working together with the Ministry of Agricultural Development of Somaliland to curb the spread of desert locusts through control operations with the use of biopesticide and surveillance efforts with an innovative tool called eLocust3.

Control operations were carried out by the Plant Protection Department of the Ministry of Agricultural Development of Somaliland on the outskirts of Geerisa town, Lughaye district, Somaliland to contain the formation of new swarms of desert locust immature adults.

Control operations in this breeding ground include the use of biopesticide through sprayers and a vehicle-mounted sprayer. Biopesticides target specifically locusts and do not harm other insects which are pollinators.

The team led by Mohamed Mohamoud, Director of the Plant Protection Department at the Ministry of Agriculture of Somaliland, is also conducting surveillance efforts thanks to the eLocust3 technology. Data gathered is transmitted via satellite to FAO’s Desert Locust Information Service to update in real time the information about the current situation in the field.

FAO said it was currently fundraising to increase the capacities of the Ministry in terms of teams on the ground to contain as much as possible the upsurge.

Desert Locust is considered the most destructive migratory pest in the world. A swarm covering one square kilometer contains 40 million locusts can eat the same amount of food in one day as 35,000 people.

FAO said the situation was extremely alarming in East Africa, a region where 20 million people are already considered food insecure.

Pasture and croplands have already suffered damage in Djibouti, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Kenya and Somalia, and there are potentially severe consequences for the region where millions rely on agriculture and livestock rearing for their survival.

According to FAO's Desert Locust Information Service, this is the worst outbreak to strike Ethiopia and Somalia for 25 years and the worst infestation that Kenya has experienced in 70 years.
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Creator
FAO
Alternate Title
unifeed200316a
Asset ID
2540706