UN / AFRICA TERRORISM

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11-Mar-2020 00:03:01
In her remarks to the Security Council on countering terrorism and extremism in Africa, UN chief of political affairs Rosemary Dicarlo said, “the threat of terrorism is often a consequence of development, humanitarian, human rights and security challenges that terrorist groups seek to exploit. Security and military solutions are thus not sufficient.” UNIFEED

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STORY: UN / AFRICA TERRORISM
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DATELINE: 11 MARCH 2020, NEW YORK CITY / FILE

SHOTLIST:

FILE – RECENT – NEW YORK CITY
1.Wide shot, exterior, United Nations Headquarters
11 MARCH 2020, NEW YORK CITY
2.Various shots, Security Council
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Rosemary A. Dicarlo, Under-Secretary-General for Political and Peacebuilding Affairs:
“The threat of terrorism is often a consequence of development, humanitarian,
human rights and security challenges that terrorist groups seek to exploit. Security and military solutions are thus not sufficient. We must address poverty, weak governance, intercommunal tensions, gender inequality, youth unemployment, illicit activities such as the trafficking in weapons and people, and the use of new technologies and social media to recruit, inflame and incite.”
4. Wide shot, Security Council
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Rosemary A. Dicarlo, Under-Secretary-General for Political and Peacebuilding Affairs:
“As terrorism has no borders, preventing and combatting it requires strong multilateral cooperation. The United Nations remains committed to bringing Member States together to share counterterrorism best practices, expertise and resources.”
6. Wide shot, Security Council
7. SOUNDBITE (English) Fatima Kyari Mohammed, Permanent Observer of the African Union to the United Nations:
“The double-edged sword of technology is a reality we have to grapple with as techniques become more sophisticated as we have seen with the reality of ‘Drone terrorism’. Terrorist groups have also perfected the art of recruitment, facilitated by the use of cyber platforms and structural vulnerabilities such as poverty, ethnic and religious fissures as well competing political ideologies.”
8.Wide shot, Security Council
9. SOUNDBITE (English) Fatima Kyari Mohammed, Permanent Observer of the African Union to the United Nations:
“We have recognized now more than ever that reinforcing our efforts to ensure the conditions conducive to the spread of terrorism must be addressed in an integrated and comprehensive manner; the need to focus more on prevention, while integrating security and law enforcement responses, as well as sustainable post-conflict stabilization and reconstruction.”
10. Wide shot, Security Council
11. SOUNDBITE (English) Fatima Kyari Mohammed, Permanent Observer of the African Union to the United Nations:
“All Member States must continuously seek to work together through approaches that do not cause harm, but rather reflect the principles that bind together our international community, and with a sense of solidarity and responsibility for the immediate and long-term welfare of all societies across the globe.”
12. Wide shot, Security Council
13. SOUNDBITE (English) Abdoulaye Mar Dieye, Assistant-Secretary-General and Special Adviser to the UNDP Administrator:
“Many violent extremist groups in Africa have coopted the message of women’s empowerment and improved socio-economic conditions. Many women who joined voluntarily are attracted by that message. If these root causes of violent extremism are not addressed, the risk of ongoing recruitment of women, including re-recruitment of many thousands of female returnees, will continue.”
14. Wide shot, Security Council

STORYLINE:

In her remarks to the Security Council on countering terrorism and extremism in Africa, UN chief of political affairs Rosemary Dicarlo said, “the threat of terrorism is often a consequence of development, humanitarian, human rights and security challenges that terrorist groups seek to exploit. Security and military solutions are thus not sufficient.”

Noting that terrorism and violent extremism, which continues to grow in various parts of the continent, despite efforts to prevent and counter it at the national, regional and international levels, Dicarlo said that the continent faces vulnerabilities that hinder its economic development and undermine human rights and the rule of law.

She noted that Al-Shabaab continues to pose the most persistent threat to
security in Somalia and East Africa despite the intensified military operations against it in recent years. ISIL and Al-Qaida affiliates are collaborating with each other to undertake increasingly sophisticated attacks in West Africa, especially in Burkina Faso, Mali and Niger. ISIL also continues to operate in Libya despite recent setbacks, and it is restructuring and empowering its affiliates in Eastern, Southern and Central Africa.

DiCarlo stressed that security and military solutions are “not sufficient.” He said, “We must address poverty, weak governance, intercommunal tensions, gender inequality, youth unemployment, illicit activities such as the trafficking in weapons and people, and the use of new technologies and social media to recruit, inflame and incite.”

The UN political chief said terrorism has no borders, and as such, “preventing and combatting it requires strong multilateral cooperation.” She said the UN remained committed to bringing Member States together to share counterterrorism best practices, expertise and resources.

Fatima Kyari Mohammed, the African Union’s ambassador to the United Nations, said, “The double-edged sword of technology is a reality we have to grapple with as techniques become more sophisticated as we have seen with the reality of ‘Drone terrorism’. Terrorist groups have also perfected the art of recruitment, facilitated by the use of cyber platforms and structural vulnerabilities such as poverty, ethnic and religious fissures as well competing political ideologies.”

The AU ambassador added, “We have recognized now more than ever that reinforcing our efforts to ensure the conditions conducive to the spread of terrorism must be addressed in an integrated and comprehensive manner; the need to focus more on prevention, while integrating security and law enforcement responses, as well as sustainable post-conflict stabilization and reconstruction.”

Mohamed stressed that all Member States “must continuously seek to work together through approaches that do not cause harm, but rather reflect the principles that bind together our international community, and with a sense of solidarity and responsibility for the immediate and long-term welfare of all societies across the globe.”


Abdoulaye Mar Dieye, Assistant-Secretary-General and Special Adviser to the UNDP Administrator, said many violent extremist groups in Africa have “coopted the message of women’s empowerment and improved socio-economic conditions.” He noted that many women who joined voluntarily were attracted by that message, adding that if these root causes of violent extremism are not addressed, “the risk of ongoing recruitment of women, including re-recruitment of many thousands of female returnees, will continue.”
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