SOUTH SUDAN / DISPLACED CHILDREN LIBRARY

Preview Language:   Original
14-Feb-2020 00:03:23
United Nations peacekeepers serving in South Sudan constructed a library and filled the shelves with both new and used books, so that children living inside a Protection of Civilians site in Juba get a chance for better life. UNMISS

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Description
STORY: SOUTH SUDAN / DISPLACED CHILDREN LIBRARY
TRT: 3:23
SOURCE: UNMISS
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGES: ENGLISH /NATS

DATELINE: 10 FEBRUARY 2020, JUBA, SOUTH SUDAN

SHOTLIST:

1. Various shots, Nyakhan Yien Jiek reading book
2. Long shot, School in the POC site
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Nyakhan Yien Jiek, Teacher, Hope Primary School:
“Education is very important because to give knowledge makes you to be busy at school. You will just think of school.”
4. Various shots, classroom
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Elisabeth Joyce Nilssen, UN Police Advisor:
“There is a tea place over there with a lot of young people. I was sitting talking with them and they were a little bit frustrated because they do not have the possibility to go to university because they don’t have the money. And then I said, yeah, but what about books but what about reading books? Oh, of course we would love reading books, but we don’t have them. And then I said, okay, if I bring books would you like to read them then? They said that would be fantastic and then I got the idea, maybe, I should make a library for these people because they want to read English, they want to practice English, but they don’t have the possibility, many of these people in here, so that’s how the idea came up.”
6. Wide shot, peacekeepers packing books
7. Med shot, loading books in truck
8. Tracking shot, van travelling through POC
9. Wide shot, Elizabeth cleaning bookshelves
10. Med shot, unloading books
11. Med Shot, teacher placing books in the shelves
12. SOUNDBITE (English) Lieut. Col. Edward Carpenter, UNMISS peacekeeper:
“I donated everything that I have here, found some from my Australian colleagues, and then over the Christmas holidays I sent a tweet out and asked all my friends to mail me their books. So, they’ve sent a lot of boxes and I’ve got a few more boxes coming so we are here trying to fill this school up so that young men and women who want to study English, read English and kind of escape from the life in the POC through a book have the opportunity to do that.”
13. Various shots, Library room
14. SOUNDBITE (English) James Kot Nyuon, Teacher, Hope Primary School:
"Those who are traumatized will be pleased by some books if they read them. I know life is very difficult here. Because of this education, people feel they are not in a very tough life, because of this education. Because of UNMISS, people feel happy, UNMISS helped them. UNMISS is always with us, protecting us in terms of security, it is giving us services like these books, so people are happy when they are in school.”
15. Various shots, classroom

STORYLINE:

Nyakhan Yien Jiek, a primary school teacher was captivated by a story of an American teenager describing his daily adventures in the book “Diary of a Wimpy Kid.” His experience is a complete novelty to this young woman, who is living and working in the United Nations protection site for displaced families in Juba.

Nyakhan is better off than many others her age. She was lucky enough to train as a teacher and, at just 23-years-old, is dedicating her life to giving the next generation the opportunities she missed out on during the civil war in South Sudan.

SOUNDBITE (English) Nyakhan Yien Jiek, Teacher, Hope Primary School:
“Education is very important because to give knowledge makes you to be busy at school. You will just think of school.”

Hundreds of children attend Hope Primary School in the protection site. Many were born in the camp after their parents sought sanctuary from the violent conflict in 2013. They have never experienced life outside. While they have access to food, water, basic healthcare and education, they are frustrated by the lack of opportunity to reach their full potential in life.

Recognizing the children’s hunger to learn, UN Police Advisor, Elisabeth Joyce Nilssen, from Norway began asking colleagues serving with the United Nations Mission in South Sudan to donate their old books. It quickly grew into a much bigger project as fellow peacekeepers joined her quest to give the children the chance for a better life. They constructed a library within a grass tukul and filled the shelves with both new and used books.

SOUNDBITE (English) Elisabeth Joyce Nilssen, UN Police Advisor:
“There is a tea place over there with a lot of young people. I was sitting talking with them and they were a little bit frustrated because they do not have the possibility to go to university because they don’t have the money. And then I said, yeah, but what about books but what about reading books? Oh, of course we would love reading books, but we don’t have them. And then I said, okay, if I bring books would you like to read them then? They said that would be fantastic and then I got the idea, maybe, I should make a library for these people because they want to read English, they want to practice English, but they don’t have the possibility, many of these people in here, so that’s how the idea came up.”

Having grown up in a poor community in Missouri in the United States, Lieutenant Colonel Edward Carpenter understood how important education is to opening children’s eyes to the world.

SOUNDBITE (English) Lieut. Col. Edward Carpenter, UNMISS peacekeeper:
“I donated everything that I have here, found some from my Australian colleagues, and then over the Christmas holidays I sent a tweet out and asked all my friends to mail me their books. So, they’ve sent a lot of boxes and I’ve got a few more boxes coming so we are here trying to fill this school up so that young men and women who want to study English, read English and kind of escape from the life in the POC through a book have the opportunity to do that.”

Teachers at the school say the library will give their students hope.

SOUNDBITE (English) James Kot Nyuon, Teacher, Hope Primary School:
"Those who are traumatized will be pleased by some books if they read them. I know life is very difficult here. Because of this education, people feel they are not in a very tough life, because of this education. Because of UNMISS, people feel happy, UNMISS helped them. UNMISS is always with us, protecting us in terms of security, it is giving us services like these books, so people are happy when they are in school.”

Happiness seems elusive for these children as the peace process stalls in South Sudan. But, despite the challenges, they manage to find joy in the simple pleasure of learning as they dream of a brighter future.
Series
Category
Geographic Subjects
Creator
UNMISS
Alternate Title
unifeed200214b
Asset ID
2532207