UN / TRANSITIONAL JUSTICE

Preview Language:   Original
13-Feb-2020 00:02:50
UN High Commissioner for Human Rights Michelle Bachelet said lasting peace is “interlinked with justice, development and respect for human rights” adding that for societies to move forward after conflicts “suffering needs to be acknowledged; confidence in State institutions restored; and justice done.” UNIFEED

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STORY: UN / TRANSITIONAL JUSTICE
TRT: 2:50
SOURCE: UNIFEED
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / SPANISH / NATS

DATELINE: 13 FEBRUARY 2020, NEW YORK CITY

SHOTLIST:

FILE - NEW YORK CITY

1. Wide shot, UNHQ exterior

13 FEBRUARY 2020, NEW YORK CITY

2. Wide shot, Security Council
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Michelle Bachelet, United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights:
“We know that lasting peace is interlinked with justice, development and respect for human rights. We know that peace does not automatically break out when weapons fall silent and atrocity crimes cease. To be able to rebuild lives — without fear of recurrence - and for society to move forward, suffering needs to be acknowledged; confidence in State institutions restored; and justice done.”
4. Med shot, delegates
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Michelle Bachelet, United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights:
“Creating trust and understanding between former enemies, and crafting a path towards sustainable peace and reconciliation, will always be a difficult challenge. Transitional justice, we know, cannot be imported or imposed from outside. Locally led and locally appropriate permutations of transitional justice have the best chances of success. Without humility and modesty, the risks of failure are real.”
6. Wide shot, Security Council
7. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Father Francisco de Roux, President, Commission for the Clarification of Truth, Coexistence and Non-repetition in Colombia:
“Peace between the State and the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC), thanks to those who reached the agreement and thanks to transitional justice, has brought positive changes to my country and has given society a new hope despite all the difficulties.”
8. Wide shot, Security Council
9. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Father Francisco de Roux, President, Commission for the Clarification of Truth, Coexistence and Non-repetition in Colombia:
“The second truth is moral, historical and social. It corresponds to the Commission of Truth. It is a truth that is not built but is discovered, that is made patent and cannot be kept silent. It is the truth that part of the testimony of the victims on all sides and asks why the events took place and the reason behind the violent processes and calls for reflection in the search for a general understanding of the tragedy, with the goal of building a new future, whether in Colombia, Peru, Guatemala, Sierra Leon, or Mali.”
10. Wide shot, Security Council
11. SOUNDBITE (English) Yasmin Sooka, Executive Director of the Foundation for Human Rights in South Africa, Trustee of the Desmond Tutu Peace Centre and Chair of the Commission on Human Rights in South Sudan:
“The reopened inquests in South Africa and the latest report that Omar Al-Bashir may be transferred to the International Criminal Court to face genocide and war crimes charges, demonstrates the importance of addressing impunity which is directly linked to restoring the Rule of Law as a prerequisite for national healing and reconciliation.”
12. Wide shot, Security Council

STORYLINE:

UN High Commissioner for Human Rights Michelle Bachelet said lasting peace is “interlinked with justice, development and respect for human rights” adding that for societies to move forward after conflicts “suffering needs to be acknowledged; confidence in State institutions restored; and justice done.”

Bachelet was addressing the Security Council via teleconference from Geneva today (13 Feb) in an open debate on transitional justice in conflict and post-conflict situations. She said that transitional justice processes that are context-specific nationally owned and focused on the needs and informed choices of victims can connect, empower and transform societies, and thereby contribute to lasting and just peace. She added that these processes have repeatedly shown they can help to address grievances and divisions.

The High Commissioner stressed that for a society to truly succeed in establishing a transition to sustainable peace, issues such as systemic discrimination and exclusion, institutional deficiencies, unfair power structures, inequalities and structural impunity must be identified, acknowledged and addressed. She said guarantees of non-recurrence are often relate to institution building, adding that it is also essential to ensure the broadest possible participation of civil society organizations in
decision-making.

Bachelet said, “Creating trust and understanding between former enemies, and crafting a path towards sustainable peace and reconciliation, will always be a difficult challenge. Transitional justice, we know, cannot be imported or imposed from outside. Locally led and locally appropriate permutations of transitional justice have the best chances of success. Without humility and modesty, the risks of failure are real.” She noted however that the international community, and particularly the Security Council, had a key role in assisting transitional States in these complex processes by sharing experiences, mandating international support and encouraging the implementation of genuinely comprehensive approaches.

Father Francisco de Roux, President of the Commission for the Clarification of Truth, Coexistence and Non-repetition in Colombia, said peace between the State and FARC in his country, “thanks to those who reached the agreement and thanks to transitional justice, has brought positive changes to my country and has given society a new hope despite all the difficulties.” He said victims of armed conflicts are the raison d’etre for transitional justice adding that the conflict in Colombia over its 50 years claimed the lives of some 240,000 people and created over nine million victims.

Father de Roux said truth was the gateway to transitional justice and a basis for the construction of a shared future for countries that have been divided by war. He said there were three types of truths, the first is judicial to guarantee that there is no impunity.

SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Father Francisco de Roux, President, Commission for the Clarification of Truth, Coexistence and Non-repetition in Colombia:
“The second truth is moral, historical and social. It corresponds to the Commission of Truth. It is a truth that is not built but is discovered, that is made patent and cannot be kept silent. It is the truth that part of the testimony of the victims on all sides and asks why the events took place and the reason behind the violent processes and calls for reflection in the search for a general understanding of the tragedy, with the goal of building a new future, whether in Colombia, Peru, Guatemala, Sierra Leon, or Mali.”

The third truth, Father de Roux lied in addressing the issue of missing person which for the families is the most cruel and concrete way to break the human being.

Yasmin Sooka, Executive Director of the Foundation for Human Rights in South Africa, said the re-opened inquest into crimes committed under apartheid in South Africa is a symbol of hope for countless victims and their families all over the world in their long arduous struggle for truth and justice.

SOUNDBITE (English) Yasmin Sooka, Executive Director of the Foundation for Human Rights in South Africa, Trustee of the Desmond Tutu Peace Centre and Chair of the Commission on Human Rights in South Sudan:
“The reopened inquests in South Africa and the latest report that Omar Al-Bashir may be transferred to the International Criminal Court to face genocide and war crimes charges, demonstrates the importance of addressing impunity which is directly linked to restoring the Rule of Law as a prerequisite for national healing and reconciliation.”

Sooka said transitional justice suggests the drawing of a line between the past and the future, however, even the best transitional justice processes often exclude many people who are not yet ready to speak or who have not been given the opportunity to tell their stories.

She stressed that fragile states emerging from conflict have not always been able to implement the ambitious transitional justice programmes they adopted, adding that many of them lack the technical capacity and the political will to do what is necessary. She said in both of these instances, the United Nations should be required to provide vital support for the implementation of such processes.
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Personal Subjects
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UNIFEED
Alternate Title
unifeed200213b
Asset ID
2531833