WHO / CORONAVIRUS

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22-Jan-2020 00:02:45
Adjourning a meeting of the International Health Regulations Emergency Committee until tomorrow as it seeks more information, WHO Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said, “if we're going to keep the world safe, transparency is number one.” WHO

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STORY: WHO / CORONAVIRUS
TRT: 02:45
SOURCE: WHO
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH

DATELINE: 22 JANUARY 2020, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND

SHOTLIST:

1. Various shots, exterior, WHO Headquarters
2. Med shot, arrival of WHO Director-General Dr Tedros, greeted by Dr Didier Houssin, Chairperson of the International Health Regulations Emergency Committee
3. Med shot, Dr Tedros, Houssin, and Dr Michael Ryan, Executive Director, WHO Health Emergencies Programme at the dais
4. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director-General, WHO:
“Transparency is very important. That really, really helps. And if we're going to keep the world safe, transparency is number one and that's what we are seeing happening and we encouraged them to continue in that direction. You have also heard, I think from the Chinese leadership exactly the same thing. We have to be transparent and do everything we can to protect ourselves and also to protect the international community.”
5. Wide shot, conference room
6. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Michael Ryan, Executive Director, WHO Health Emergencies Programme:
“The primary issue is to limit human to human transmission, to reduce secondary infections, especially amongst close contacts and particularly in healthcare environments. We need to prevent transmission through amplification events and super spreading events and obviously, prevent further international spread.”
7. Med shot, Dr Tedros
8. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Michael Ryan, Executive Director, WHO Health Emergencies Programme:
“Just to briefly summarize to you that WHO has been on full activation of our incident management system since the last day of 2019. We are across the three levels of our organization. We've been coordinating a series of global expert networks and partnerships that have dealt with laboratory diagnostic assay development, infection prevention and control, clinical management, standardized data collection, medical modeling, research and development, and many other pillars of the response. We've been providing technical support to member States, both member States affected and unaffected States.”
9. Wide shot, conference room
10. SOUNDBITE (English) Der Maria Van Kerkhove, WHO Head a.i., Emerging Diseases and Zoonosis:
“Within China, we've asked our, our colleagues in China to further explain to us what they're doing to better understand the extent of infection in Wuhan, but also in other parts of China. And then importantly, amongst those cases that they've identified, how many of those are related to human to human transmission?”
11. Wide shot, conference room
12. SOUNDBITE (English) Der Maria Van Kerkhove, WHO Head a.i., Emerging Diseases and Zoonosis:
“What we understand from the 2019 novel coronavirus is that it can cause a range of disease in individuals who are infected from mild disease all the way to severe disease and death. That's quite a range. Investigations are still ongoing to better articulate what proportion of individuals will have mild disease or severe disease and what risk factors they may have to result in more significant disease.”
13. Wide shot, conference room

STORYLINE:
Adjourning a meeting of the International Health Regulations Emergency Committee until tomorrow as it seeks more information, WHO Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus today (22 Jan) said, “if we're going to keep the world safe, transparency is number one.”

Talking to reporters, Dr Tedros said, “that's what we are seeing happening and we encouraged them to continue in that direction. You have also heard, I think from the Chinese leadership exactly the same thing. We have to be transparent and do everything we can to protect ourselves and also to protect the international community.”

Also briefing reporters, WHOs Executive Director for the Health Emergencies Programme said, “the primary issue is to limit human to human transmission, to reduce secondary infections, especially amongst close contacts and particularly in healthcare environments. We need to prevent transmission through amplification events and super spreading events and obviously, prevent further international spread.”

Ryan said, “just to briefly summarize to you that WHO has been on full activation of our incident management system since the last day of 2019. We are across the three levels of our organization. We've been coordinating a series of global expert networks and partnerships that have dealt with laboratory diagnostic assay development, infection prevention and control, clinical management, standardized data collection, medical modeling, research and development, and many other pillars of the response. We've been providing technical support to member States, both member States affected and unaffected States.”

For her part, WHO’s Head of Emerging Diseases and Zoonosis, Der Maria Van Kerkhove, said, “within China, we've asked our, our colleagues in China to further explain to us what they're doing to better understand the extent of infection in Wuhan, but also in other parts of China. And then importantly, amongst those cases that they've identified, how many of those are related to human to human transmission?”

Van Kerkhove said, “what we understand from the 2019 novel coronavirus is that it can cause a range of disease in individuals who are infected from mild disease all the way to severe disease and death. That's quite a range. Investigations are still ongoing to better articulate what proportion of individuals will have mild disease or severe disease and what risk factors they may have to result in more significant disease.”

On 31 December 2019, WHO was alerted to several cases of pneumonia in Wuhan City, Hubei Province of China. The virus did not match any other known virus. This raised concern because when a virus is new, we do not know how it affects people.

One week later, on 7 January, Chinese authorities confirmed that they had identified a new virus. The new virus is a coronavirus, which is a family of viruses that include the common cold, and viruses such as SARS and MERS. This new virus was temporarily named “2019-nCoV.”

WHO has been working with Chinese authorities and global experts to learn more about the virus, how it affects the people who are sick with it, how they can be treated, and what countries can do to respond.

Because this is a coronavirus, which usually causes respiratory illness, WHO has advice to people on how to protect themselves and those around them from getting the disease.
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