UN / GUTERRES 2020 AGENDA

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22-Jan-2020 00:03:07
In laying his priorities for the year ahead, UN chief António Guterres identified “four horsemen” which endanger progress in the 21st century and could “jeopardize every aspect of our shared future.” UNIFEED

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STORY: UN / GUTERRES 2020 AGENDA
TRT: 3:07
SOURCE: UNIFEED
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / FRENCH / NATS

DATELINE: 22 JANUARY 2020, NEW YORK CITY

SHOTLIST:

FILE - NEW YORK CITY

1. Wide shot, UNHQ exterior

22 JANUARY 2020, NEW YORK CITY

2. Wide shot, Trusteeship Council
3. SOUNDBITE (English) António Guterres, Secretary-General, United Nations:
“The four horsemen – epic geopolitical tensions, the climate crisis, global mistrust and the downsides of technology – can jeopardize every aspect of our shared future. That is why commemorating the 75th anniversary with nice speeches won’t do. We must address these four 21st-century challenges with four 21st-century solutions.”
4. Wide shot, Trusteeship Council
5. SOUNDBITE (English) António Guterres, Secretary-General, United Nations:
“But as we look ahead, we have our work cut out for us. We see Gordian Knots across the world -- from the Gulf to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, from the Sahel and Lake Chad to Venezuela. Security Council resolutions are being ignored. Outside interference is fuelling fires. And we are at risk of losing pillars of the international disarmament and arms control architecture without viable alternatives. Yes, the United Nations continues to deliver life-saving aid to millions of people in desperate need. But temporary relief is no substitute for permanent solutions.”
6. Wide shot, Trusteeship Council
7. SOUNDBITE (English) António Guterres, Secretary-General, United Nations:
“We are at war with nature. And nature is fighting back hard. One cannot look at the recent fires in Australia – at people fleeing their homes and wildlife consumed by the flames – without profound sadness at today’s plight and fear for what the future may bring. Meanwhile, air pollution combined with climate change is killing 7 million people every year. Gradual approaches are no longer enough.”
8. Wide shot, Trusteeship Council
9. SOUNDBITE (English) António Guterres, Secretary-General, United Nations:
“So, let us make the 2020s the Decade of Action and let us make 2020 the year of urgency. And, as we do, let us spare no effort to rebuild trust. I make a special appeal to all Member States: Listen to people. Open new channels for all to be heard and find common ground. Respect freedom of peaceful assembly and expression. Protect civic space and freedom of the press. And let us harness the ideas and energy and sense of hope of young people —in particular young women — demanding change and constructive solutions.”
10. Wide shot, Trusteeship Council
11. SOUNDBITE (French) António Guterres, Secretary-General, United Nations:
“We need a common effort to ensure artificial intelligence is a force for the service of humans. Despite last year’s important step within the Convention on Certain Conventional Weapons, we are still lurching toward a world of killer machines acting outside human judgment or control. I have a simple and direct plea to all Member States: Ban lethal autonomous weapons now.”
12. Wide shot, Trusteeship Council

STORYLINE:

In laying his priorities for the year ahead, UN chief António Guterres identified “four horsemen” which endanger progress in the 21st century and could “jeopardize every aspect of our shared future.”

Addressing the General Assembly today (22 Jan), Guterres said these “horsemen” include “epic geopolitical tensions, the climate crisis, global mistrust and the downsides of technology.” He added that as we commemorate the UN’s 75th anniversary in 2020, “nice speeches won’t do; we must address these four 21st-century challenges with four 21st-century solutions.”

Guterres stressed the role of prevention, mediation and peacekeeping to address geopolitical tensions. He noted that there are some signs of hope, but underscored that “as we look ahead, we have our work cut out for us.” He added, “We see Gordian Knots across the world -- from the Gulf to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, from the Sahel and Lake Chad to Venezuela. Security Council resolutions are being ignored. Outside interference is fuelling fires. And we are at risk of losing pillars of the international disarmament and arms control architecture without viable alternatives. Yes, the United Nations continues to deliver life-saving aid to millions of people in desperate need. But temporary relief is no substitute for permanent solutions.”

The Secretary-General said the threat of climate catastrophe must be met with the promise of climate action. He said, “We are at war with nature. And nature is fighting back hard. One cannot look at the recent fires in Australia – at people fleeing their homes and wildlife consumed by the flames – without profound sadness at today’s plight and fear for what the future may bring. Meanwhile, air pollution combined with climate change is killing 7 million people every year. Gradual approaches are no longer enough.”

Guterres called on the main emitters to lead the way and step up ahead of COP26 in Glasgow adding that he believed the climate battle was a battle we could still win.

To address global mistrust, the Secretary-General said countries must build a fair globalization, and he highlighted the importance of women fully participating in all aspects of society including decision-making. He said concrete progress has been made on the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development but noted that the world was still off track.

He launched the Decade of Action to deliver the Sustainable Development Goals by 2030 which he said was central to achieving a fair globalization, boosting economic growth and preventing conflict.

He said, “Let us make the 2020s the Decade of Action and let us make 2020 the year of urgency. And, as we do, let us spare no effort to rebuild trust. I make a special appeal to all Member States: Listen to people. Open new channels for all to be heard and find common ground. Respect freedom of peaceful assembly and expression. Protect civic space and freedom of the press. And let us harness the ideas and energy and sense of hope of young people —in particular young women — demanding change and constructive solutions.”

The Secretary-General said that we must steer technology for positive change and promote global digital cooperation, noting that the UN is a tailor-made platform for governments, business and civil society to come together to build agile and flexible regulatory frameworks.

Guterres underscored the need to ensure that “artificial intelligence is a force for the service of humans.” He said, “Despite last year’s important step within the Convention on Certain Conventional Weapons, we are still lurching toward a world of killer machines acting outside human judgment or control. I have a simple and direct plea to all Member States: Ban lethal autonomous weapons now.”

The UN chief added that across the work in facing these four big threats, the promotion and protection of all human rights must be central. He expressed his deep concern over the different ways in which respect for human rights is being eroded around the world. He told the General Assembly that he would launch a call for stepped up global action on human rights and human dignity next month in Geneva.
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