ICJ / AUNG SAN SUU KYI

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11-Dec-2019 00:03:28
Speaking at the International Court of Justice (ICJ), Nobel Peace laureate Aung San Suu Kyi said the case alleging genocide in Rakhine State brought against her country by the Gambia is “incomplete and misleading,” yet stressed the importance of the Court assessing the situation “dispassionately and accurately.” ICJ

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STORY: ICJ / AUNG SAN SUU KYI
TRT: 3:28
SOURCE: ICJ
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 11 DECEMBER 2019, THE HAGUE, NETHERLANDS

SHOTLIST:

11 DECEMBER 2019, THE HAGUE, NETHERLANDS

1. Various shots, judges entering Court
2. Med shot, Abdulqawi Ahmed Yusuf, President of the International Court of Justice 3.
4. Wide shot, Aung San Suu Kyi walking to podium
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Aung San Suu Kyi, Union Minister of Foreign Affairs, Myanmar:
“Regrettably, the Gambia has placed before the Court an incomplete and misleading factual picture of the situation in Rakhine State in Myanmar. Yet, it is of the utmost importance that the Court assess the situation obtained on the ground in Rakhine dispassionately and accurately.”
6. Wide shot, judges listening to Aung San Suu Kyi
7. SOUNDBITE (English) Aung San Suu Kyi, Union Minister of Foreign Affairs, Myanmar:
“It cannot be ruled out that disproportionate force was used by members of the defense services in some cases in disregard of international humanitarian law, or that they did not distinguish clearly enough between ARSA fighters and civilians. There may also have been failures to prevent civilians from looting or destroying property after fighting or in abandoned villages. But these are determinations to be made in the due course of the criminal justice process, not by any individual in the Myanmar Government.”
8. Wide shot, Aung San Suu Kyi addressing the Court
9. SOUNDBITE (English) Aung San Suu Kyi, Union Minister of Foreign Affairs, Myanmar:
“Can there be genocidal intent on the part of a State that actively investigates, prosecutes, and punishes soldiers and officers who are accused of wrongdoing? All of the focus here is on members of the military. I can assure you that appropriate action will also be taken against civilian offenders in line with due process. There will be no tolerance of human rights violations in the Rakhine or elsewhere in Myanmar.”
10. Wide shot, Aung San Suu Kyi addressing the Court
11. SOUNDBITE (English) Aung San Suu Kyi, Union Minister of Foreign Affairs, Myanmar:
“If war crimes have been committed by members of Myanmar’s Defense Services, they will be prosecuted through our military justice system in accordance with Myanmar’s constitution. It is a matter for the competent criminal justice authorities to assess whether, for example, there had been inadequate distinction between civilians and ARSA fighters, disproportionate use of force, violations of human rights, failure to prevent plundering of property or destruction, or acts of possible displacement of civilians. Such conduct if proven could be relevant under international humanitarian law or human rights conventions, but not under the 1948 genocide convention.”
12. Wide shot, judges listening to Aung San Suu Kyi
13. SOUNDBITE (English) Aung San Suu Kyi, Union Minister of Foreign Affairs, Myanmar:
“Rakhine today suffers an internal armed conflict between the Buddhist Arakan Army and Myanmar’s Defense Services. Muslims are not a party to this conflict, but may, like other civilians in the conflict area, be affected by security measures that are in place. We pray the Court to refrain from taking any action that might aggravate the ongoing conflict, and armed conflict, and peace and security in Rakhine.”
14. Wide shot, Court

STORYLINE:

Speaking at the International Court of Justice (ICJ), Nobel Peace laureate Aung San Suu Kyi said the case alleging genocide in Rakhine State brought against her country by the Gambia is “incomplete and misleading,” yet stressed the importance of the Court assessing the situation “dispassionately and accurately.”

In her statement today (11 Dec) at the ICJ, Aung San Suu Kyi said the situation in Rakhine is complex and outlined decades of tensions between Rakhine’s mainly Rohingya Muslim community and their Buddhist neighbours.

The Foreign Minister said, “It cannot be ruled out that disproportionate force was used by the defense services in some cases in disregard of international humanitarian law, or that they did not distinguish clearly enough between ARSA fighters and civilians. There may also have been failures to prevent civilians from looting or destroying property after fighting or in abandoned villages. But these are determinations to be made in the due course of the criminal justice process, not by any individual in the Myanmar Government.”

Suu Kyi said if war crimes have been committed by members of Myanmar’s defense services, they will be prosecuted through the country military justice system, in accordance with Myanmar’s constitution. She also listed several cases where military personnel were prosecuted and sentenced for wrong doings in the Rakhine.

SOUNDBITE (English) Aung San Suu Kyi, Union Minister of Foreign Affairs, Myanmar:
“Can there be genocidal intent on the part of a State that actively investigates, prosecutes, and punishes soldiers and officers who are accused of wrongdoing? All of the focus here is on members of the military. I can assure you that appropriate action will also be taken against civilian offenders in line with due process. There will be no tolerance of human rights violations in the Rakhine or elsewhere in Myanmar.”

The Foreign Minister stressed that Myanmar’s own military justice system must be responsible for investigating and prosecuting allegations of possible war crimes by soldiers or officers in Rakhine. She said, “It is a matter for the competent criminal justice authorities to assess whether, for example, there had been inadequate distinction between civilians and ARSA fighters, disproportionate use of force, violations of human rights, failure to prevent plundering of property or destruction, or acts of possible displacement of civilians. Such conduct if proven could be relevant under international humanitarian law or human rights conventions, but not under the 1948 genocide convention.”

Suu Kyi said Rakhine today suffers an internal armed conflict between the “Buddhist Arakan Army and Myanmar’s Defense Services; Muslims are not a party to this conflict, but may, like other civilians in the conflict area, be affected by security measures that are in place.” She called on the Court to refrain from taking any action that might “aggravate the ongoing conflict, and armed conflict, and peace and security in Rakhine.”
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