SOUTH SUDAN / HEAVY RAINS FLOODING

Preview Language:   Original
02-Dec-2019 00:02:23
Humanitarians are providing emergency relief, including food, access to clean water, shelter and medicine to prevent the spread of waterborne diseases among families affected by heavy rains, which caused devastating floods across the Jonglei region. UNMISS

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Description
STORY: SOUTH SUDAN / HEAVY RAINS FLOODING
TRT: 2:23
SOURCE: UNMISS
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGES: ENGLISH / LOU NUER / NATS

DATELINE: 28 NOVEMBER 2019, AKOBO, SOUTH SUDAN / FILE

SHOTLIST:

28 NOVEMBER 2019, AKOBO, SOUTH SUDAN

1. Various Shots, Residents of Akobo

FILE - 12 SEPTEMBER 2018, ADDIS ABABA, ETHIOPIA

2. Various Shots, Peace Agreement Signing

28 NOVEMBER 2019, AKOBO, SOUTH SUDAN

3. Various Shots, Akobo Floods
4. SOUNDBITE (Lou Nuer) Nadak Pal, Akobo Flood Victim:
“When we were displaced by the flooding, we felt sad because we had to leave everything behind. We need shelter. We need food. Now we are not getting those things because we had to leave our homes. I’m sleeping outside which is not good.”
5. Various Shots, Humanitarian distribution
6. SOUNDBITE (English) David Shearer, Special Representative of the UN Secretary-General for South Sudan and Head of UNMISS:
“This area here is low-lying. The water is coming down from Ethiopia as well. It’s a real tragedy. We will go back and have a talk to the humanitarians. I know that the World Food Programme through Oxfam is already bringing some food in. Obviously, the scale of need is perhaps more than anyone thought. And the real worry, to be honest, is further down the track in a few months’ time. Yes, we can supply emergency support now, but these people are going to rely, or have been relying for years and years, on harvests. Those harvests are likely to be badly affected so there is going to be less food that they are going to grow themselves so they may be more dependent on food coming in from outside.”
7. Various Shots, UNMISS Base Flooding
8. SOUNDBITE (Lou Nuer) Nadak Pal, Akobo Flood Victim:
“Peace is good for the community. When you talk about peace, you can get everything you want. You can get food from your garden. You can look forward in life. Peace is good.”
9. Various Shots, Residents of Akobo

STORYLINE:

Thousands of families forced to flee their homes during the civil war in South Sudan have been returning to the town of Akobo in the wake of a new peace deal signed by the country’s leaders last year. The agreement, which included a ceasefire, has resulted in a significant reduction in political violence, giving families the confidence needed to head home and rebuild their lives.

But heavy rain, which has resulted in devastating floods across the Jonglei region, has proven to be another set-back for this already poverty-stricken community. Houses and land have been submerged in water, families have been displaced yet again, and access to basic services is extremely limited.

SOUNDBITE (Lou Nuer) Nadak Pal, Akobo Flood Victim:
“When we were displaced by the flooding, we felt sad because we had to leave everything behind. We need shelter. We need food. Now we are not getting those things because we had to leave our homes. I’m sleeping outside which is not good.”

Humanitarians are providing emergency relief, including food, access to clean water, shelter and medicine to prevent the spread of waterborne diseases. That life-saving support is critical to easing the immediate crisis, but the damage caused by the flooding over the longer-term will ultimately increase the hardship and suffering of Akobo residents.

SOUNDBITE (English) David Shearer, Special Representative of the UN Secretary-General for South Sudan and Head of UNMISS:
“This area here is low-lying. The water is coming down from Ethiopia as well. It’s a real tragedy. We will go back and have a talk to the humanitarians. I know that the World Food Programme through Oxfam is already bringing some food in. Obviously, the scale of need is perhaps more than anyone thought. And the real worry, to be honest, is further down the track in a few months’ time. Yes, we can supply emergency support now, but these people are going to rely, or have been relying for years and years, on harvests. Those harvests are likely to be badly affected so there is going to be less food that they are going to grow themselves so they may be more dependent on food coming in from outside.”

The United Nations Mission in South Sudan established a new peacekeeping base in Akobo in February 2018 to help protect civilians and facilitate the safe delivery of humanitarian aid. The base, the first to be located in opposition-held territory since the civil war erupted, also suffered severe damage from the floods.

Despite the challenges they face, the peacekeepers and the local community remain committed to working together to build reconciliation and peace.

SOUNDBITE (Lou Nuer) Nadak Pal, Akobo Flood Victim:
“Peace is good for the community. When you talk about peace, you can get everything you want. You can get food from your garden. You can look forward in life. Peace is good.”

Their hope is that the international community will respond to their suffering and commit fresh funding to the flood relief effort as well as maintaining political pressure on South Sudan’s leaders to deliver the durable peace they have promised for so long.
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UNMISS
Alternate Title
unifeed191202c
Asset ID
2508744