CAR / HIV MEDICINE

Preview Language:   Original
26-Nov-2019 00:03:09
Community groups deliver HIV medicine in a remote area in the conflict-torn Central African Republic (CAR). UNAIDS

Available Language: French
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Description
STORY: CAR / HIV MEDICINE
TRT: 3:10
SOURCE: UNAIDS
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: FRENCH / NATS

DATELINE: OCTOBER 2019, ZENMIO, CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC

SHOTLIST:

1.Various shots, aerial drone shots, of Zemio and surrounding area
2.Close up, sign Zemio
3.various shots, street views
4.Wide shot, trees growing within torn down brick building
5.Wide shot, Toyota car next to another one with broken windows and no wheels
6.Various shots, Marina living with HIV, with her child
7.SOUNDBITE (French) Marina, Woman living with HIV:
“Before I was strong and healthy with the treatment. Due to the violence, I had to flee to DRC. We did not have anything to eat, it was very hard. I could not take my pills. That's when I got sick again...The viral load became very high.”
8. Wide shot, exterior, Zemio hospital
9.Wide shot, sign indicating waiting room of hospital
10.Wide shot, exterior female ward at hospital
11.Wide shot, inside of room with male nurse talking to staff
12.Close up, male nurse Bienvenu looking at patient, mosquito net up
13.SOUNDBITE (French) Bienvenu, Zemio Hospital Nurse:
"There is poverty here, there is starvation here. Women have had to resort to sex to scrape 100 francs for their survival."
14.Wide shot, Bienvenu going through papers
15.Vairous shots, Bienvenu’s hand comparing and writing down patient information in a ledger
16.Wide shot, Fiacre at hospital dispensary
17.Wide shot, pharmacist looking at a list with a pen
18.Close up, boxes of pills
19.Various shots, Pharmacist giving pills to Fiacre
20. Various shots, Fiacre carrying box of ARVs leaving the hospital
21.SOUNDBITE (French) Fiacre, Community ARV Group member:
“The nurses came to check my viral load ... I am now undetectable.”
21.Various shots, nurse preparing HIV test by imbibing cotton pad with alcohol
22. Close up, blood on testing strip

STORYLINE:

Community groups deliver HIV medicine in a remote area in the conflict-torn Central African Republic (CAR).

In a remote area of southeastern Central African Republic (CAR), few convoys pass and getting supplies remains difficult. Infrastructure is non-existent and illegal checkpoints manned by armed men litter the roads.

Due to the 2017 conflicts between armed groups more than 40,000 people are displaced in the area. At least 30,000 live in neighboring countries of South Sudan and the Democratic Republic of Congo.

Marina has been living with HIV since 2010. Two years ago, she left her country because of the clashes. She returned to Zemio two months ago despite the insecurity to access treatment. Not all have been so lucky. Due to the isolation and population displacement, the Haut Mbomou region where Zemio is located has the highest HIV prevalence in CAR: 12%, more than triple the rest of the country.

SOUNDBITE (French) Marina, Woman living with HIV:
“Before I was strong and healthy with the treatment. Due to the violence, I had to flee to DRC. We did not have anything to eat, it was very hard. I could not take my pills. That's when I got sick again...The viral load became very high.”

SOUNDBITE (French) Bienvenu, Zemio Hospital Nurse:
"There is poverty here, there is starvation here. Women have had to resort to sex to scrape 100 francs for their survival."

Fiacre is a representative of a CAG, "Community ARV Group." Set up in late 2016 by Medecins Sans Frontieres, CAGs are groups of people living with HIV who support and help each other. He bicycles to the local Zemio hospital to pick up 6-months worth of ARVs for a dozen people. He limits hospital trips for others as well as costs of travel. Once the supplies are loaded, he gets his blood work checked.

SOUNDBITE (French) Fiacre, Community ARV Group member:
“The nurses came to check my viral load ... I am now undetectable.”

Over the past year, out of 700 CAG members in the region's different groups, 80 per cent have had their viral load suppressed thanks to effective treatment.

A person living with HIV taking regular antiretroviral treatment, like Fiacre who is HIV positive, will have such low levels that blood tests cannot detect it. Therefore, a person becomes undetectable and no longer transmits HIV.

Community initiatives - many initiated by people living or affected by HIV - have always played a major role in the global fight against HIV. For UNAIDS, strengthening and supporting them is key to ensure the response to HIV remains relevant and grounded.

UNAIDS Estimates that 37.9 million people globally were living with HIV; 24 people were accessing treatment; 1.7 million people became newly infected with HIV in 2018; 770 000 people died from AIDS-related illnesses in 2018; 32.0 million people have died from AIDS-related illnesses since the start of the epidemic.
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UNAIDS
Alternate Title
unifeed191126d
Asset ID
2506993