UN / SEXUAL VIOLENCE

Preview Language:   Original
30-Oct-2019 00:03:15
UN Special Representative on Sexual Violence in Conflict Pramila Patten said the past ten years have seen more concerted action to combat this scourge than what we have seen in the rest of human history combined. UNIFEED

Available Languages: Arabic, English, French
Type
Language
Format
Acquire
/
Arabic
Other Formats
Description
STORY: UN / SEXUAL VIOLENCE
TRT: 3:15
SOURCE: UNIFEED
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ARABIC / ENGLISH / FRENCH

DATELINE: 30 OCTOBER 2019, NEW YORK CITY

SHOTLIST:

FILE - NEW YORK CITY

1. Aerial shot, UNHQ exterior

30 OCTOBER 2019, NEW YORK CITY

2. Wide shot, ECOSOC Chamber
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Pramila Patten, Special Representative of the Secretary-General on Sexual Violence in Conflict, United Nations:
“A survivor-centred, rights-based response requires tailored, contextual solutions. It means giving voice and choice to survivors, restoring their agency, building their resilience, and enshrining their experience on the historical record. Solidarity and empathy must lead to action.”
4. Wide shot, participants in meeting
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Pramila Patten, Special Representative of the Secretary-General on Sexual Violence in Conflict, United Nations:
“So, let us seize this moment to set the stage for a new decade of decisive action to remove sexual violence from our daily headlines and relegate it – once and for all – to the annals of history. Let us live up to the founding promise of the UN Charter to ‘save succeeding generations from the scourge of war,’ including from its most intimate, ancient and enduring atrocity, the scourge of wartime rape.”
6. Wide shot, ECOSOC Chamber
7. SOUNDBITE (English) Grace Naledi Mandisa Pandor, Minister of International Relations and Cooperation, South Africa:
“Some of our armed forces have been involved in violence, sexual violence, gender-based violence, against those they are meant to protect. This has been a shame for our country, and we have had to pass appropriate legislation in order to be able to prosecute such individuals. But it is clear that if we deploy uniformed services in any part of the world, we should not make an assumption that it is understood that those who serve and there to protect the weak and innocent. They must be trained to understand that they are there to protect.”
8. Wide shot, Pandor at podium
9. Wide shot, participants in meeting
10. SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Nadia Murad, Nobel Peace Prize Laureate:
“Reparations are a right and pressure should be applied on governments to shoulder their responsibilities in providing this right. Reparations also aid survivors in starting to heal. Reparations make survivors visible, heard, and recognized. Survivors cannot start gathering the broken pieces of their lives and begin rebuilding without reparations.”
11. Wide shot, participants in meeting
12. SOUNDBITE (French) Denis Mukwege, Nobel Peace Prize Laureate:
“Until recently, the link between sexual violence and international peace and security wasn’t properly established and the cries of survivors were not heard. Indifference and inaction prevailed for far too long. Ladies and gentlemen, today something that was once seen as an inevitable consequence of war is not seen as something that can be avoided.”
13. Wide shot, ECOSOC Chamber

STORYLINE:

UN Special Representative on Sexual Violence in Conflict Pramila Patten said the past ten years have seen more concerted action to combat this scourge than what we have seen in the rest of human history combined.

Speaking at an event commemorating the tenth anniversary of the mandate on Sexual Violence in Conflict, Patten said there is a new consensus that conflict-related sexual violence is a threat to international peace and security. She called for a “survivor-centred, rights-based response” which requires “tailored, contextual solutions.” She said this means “giving voice and choice to survivors, restoring their agency, building their resilience, and enshrining their experience on the historical record. Solidarity and empathy must lead to action.”

Looking to the future, Patten asked for a “new decade of decisive action to remove sexual violence from our daily headlines and relegate it – once and for all – to the annals of history.” She called on the international community to “live up to the founding promise of the UN Charter to ‘save succeeding generations from the scourge of war,’ including from its most intimate, ancient and enduring atrocity, the scourge of wartime rape.”

South African Foreign Minister Naledi Pandor said sexual violence occurs in all countries both in conflict and at peace and needs a multi-dimensional approach to address it. She said some South African peacekeepers “have been involved in violence, sexual violence, gender-based violence, against those they are meant to protect. This has been a shame for our country, and we have had to pass appropriate legislation in order to be able to prosecute such individuals.”

Pandor said it is clear that if “we deploy uniformed services in any part of the world, we should not make an assumption that it is understood that those who serve and there to protect the weak and innocent. They must be trained to understand that they are there to protect.” She also noted the importance of addressing sexual and gender-based violence which could be faced by women serving in peacekeeping missions.

The meeting also marked the launch of a new Global Fund for Survivors, which came as a result of efforts by Nobel Peace Prize Laureates Nadia Murad and Denis Mukwege.

Nadia Murad, a survivor of crimes committed by ISIL, the Fund would help transform the lives of thousands of survivors and their families. She said survivors must be a part of the peace and reconciliation process and play a meaningful role in all its aspects.

SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Nadia Murad, Nobel Peace Prize Laureate:
“Reparations are a right and pressure should be applied on governments to shoulder their responsibilities in providing this right. Reparations also aid survivors in starting to heal. Reparations make survivors visible, heard, and recognized. Survivors cannot start gathering the broken pieces of their lives and begin rebuilding without reparations.”

Murad said reparations did not have a high priority both at the national and international levels and this must change. She called on all states to support the work of the Global Fund for Survivors.

Denis Mukwege said the human community has a responsibility to answer the calls of victims. He stressed that this type of violence should never exist, and neither should funds to support them, and called on States to take responsibility in protecting their people, particularly women and children. He said we must redouble our efforts to ensure that victims’ rehabilitation in seen as a human right.

SOUNDBITE (French) Denis Mukwege, Nobel Peace Prize Laureate:
“Until recently, the link between sexual violence and international peace and security wasn’t properly established and the cries of survivors were not heard. Indifference and inaction prevailed for far too long. Ladies and gentlemen, today something that was once seen as an inevitable consequence of war is not seen as something that can be avoided.”

Mukwege said the Global Fund for Survivors will go hand in hand with the fight to end impunity for sexual crimes but is not a substitute for justice, adding that criminals must pay for their actions.
Series
Category
Topical Subjects
Personal Subjects
Creator
UNIFEED
Alternate Title
unifeed191030a
Asset ID
2488587