ETHIOPIA / REFUGEES JOB TRAINING

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29-Oct-2019 00:04:34
A vocational training program in Ethiopia funded by the German development agency is offering refugee and host communities shared opportunities to learn, contribute to the country’s economy and become more independent. UNHCR

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STORY: ETHIOPIA / REFUGEES JOB TRAINING
TRT: 4:34
SOURCE: UNHCR
RESTRICTIONS: PLEASE CREDIT UNHCR ON SCREEN
LANGUAGE: AMHARIC / ARABIC / ENGLISH

DATELINE: 2-3 SEPTEMBER 2019, ADDIS ABABA, ETHIOPIA

SHOTLIST:

2-3 SEPTEMBER 2019, ADDIS ABABA, ETHIOPIA

1. Med shot, Hanan in class among students
2. Wide shot, teacher conducting lesson
3. SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Hanan Seif Hassan, Yemeni refugee:
“I felt shy about going back to school after all these years but when I saw how others were working, I got excited and settled in.”
4. Various shots, Hanan and Yanchinew in class
5. SOUNDBITE (Amharic) Yanchinew Gebeyahu, Ethiopian student:
“People came from different countries and it was difficult to understand each other.”
6. Close up, Yanchinew
7. Med shot, Hanan and Yanchinew in class
8. SOUNDBITE (Amharic) Yanchinew Gebeyahu, Ethiopian student:
“I knew things would get better with time.”
9. Wide shot, students making samosas
10. Close up, samosas being fried
11. SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Hanan Seif Hassan, Yemeni refugee:
“We stuff it with meat, lentils, fruits, dates, tahini and cheese. We stuff it with anything that is requested, with whatever people like.”
12. Various shots, students in cooking class
13. SOUNDBITE (Amharic) Yanchinew Gebeyahu, Ethiopian student:
“Within a day it is possible to make 200 samosas. If we can have a market for those 200 samosas per day, I think that we are going to make a profit.”
14. Wide shot, busy street
15. Med shot, Hanan and Yanchinew walking in street
16. Wide shot, men opening workshop doors
17. Various shots, students in metal training class
18. SOUNDBITE (English) Melese Yigzaw, Dean, Nefas Silk College:
“We conduct, we design, we prepare curriculums that helps to give the training for refugees and host communities, but we are delivering the courses or the classes on the same class like that of regular students.”
19. Various shots, students in metal training class
20. SOUNDBITE (English) Tobias Erbet, Project Coordinator, Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ):
“The college itself is also benefiting, you know. Teachers here receive additional training in their respective subject matter, welding, woodwork and so on. We will support the college in establishing an entrepreneurship centre which can give support to upcoming start-ups of course from the inclusive classes for refugees and Ethiopians.”
21. Various shots, students in cooking class
22. SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Hanan Seif Hassan, Yemeni refugee:
“She is a really close friend and I love her so much. She is very sweet and decent.”
23. Various shots, students in cooking class
24. SOUNDBITE (Amharic) Yanchinew Gebeyahu, Ethiopian student:
“Learning together has exposed me to different cultures and languages and I have learned something. I now know how they live back home.”
25. Med shots, Hanan and Yanchinew in streets

STORYLINE:

A vocational training program in Ethiopia funded by the German development agency is offering refugee and host communities shared opportunities to learn, contribute to the country’s economy and become more independent.

Ethiopia’s Nefas Silk Polytechnic College offers a first of its kind training program where refugees learn skills in cooking, woodwork, mechanics and other subjects, alongside Ethiopians in the same class.

The initiative at Nefas Silk College is part of the Qualifications and Employment Perspectives for Refugees and Host Communities Programme (QEP), commissioned by the German Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ) and implemented by GIZ, the German development agency.


Hanan Seif Hassan, 32-year-old refugee from Yemen, was not sure what to expect at first. She worried about fitting in as a mature student and a refugee.

SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Hanan Seif Hassan, Yemeni refugee:
“I felt shy about going back to school after all these years but when I saw how others were working, I got excited and settled in.”

Spending time with her Ethiopian peers has also helped Hanan forge a deeper understanding and appreciation of her new home. Her concerns evaporated once she got to know her classmates, including her Ethiopian best friend, Yanchinew Gebeyehu, 26.

SOUNDBITE (Amharic) Yanchinew Gebeyahu, Ethiopian student:
“People came from different countries and it was difficult to understand each other.”

The women became friends while attending a vocational training course at Addis Ababa’s Nefas Silk Polytechnic College.

SOUNDBITE (Amharic) Yanchinew Gebeyahu, Ethiopian student:
“I knew things would get better with time.”

All morning, Hanan and her friends have been chopping onions, peeling carrots, boiling lentils, cooking rice and preparing samosas – to sell as popular snacks.

SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Hanan Seif Hassan, Yemeni refugee:
“We stuff it with meat, lentils, fruits, dates, tahini and cheese. We stuff it with anything that is requested, with whatever people like.”

QEP improves employment prospects in Ethiopia for both refugees and Ethiopians alike. After six months of training, Hanan and Yanchinew came up with a business plan to help launch their samosas on the market.

SOUNDBITE (Amharic) Yanchinew Gebeyahu, Ethiopian student:
“Within a day it is possible to make 200 samosas. If we can have a market for those 200 samosas per day, I think that we are going to make a profit.”

Home to one of the largest refugee populations in Africa, Ethiopia passed a historic new refugee law in January 2019.

Melese Yigzaw, dean of the college said it is vital that refugees and Ethiopians are given the same opportunities to prepare for the job market.

SOUNDBITE (English) Melese Yigzaw, Dean, Nefas Silk College:
“We conduct, we design, we prepare curriculums that helps to give the training for refugees and host communities, but we are delivering the courses or the classes on the same class like that of regular students.”

Considered one of the most progressive refugee policies anywhere in the world, the Refugee Proclamation gives refugees the right to obtain work permits, access primary education, legally register births and marriages and access financial services, such as banking.

With support, the skills learned here could be life changing. Graduates could start a business or find jobs, and the college can reach more people.

SOUNDBITE (English) Tobias Erbet, Project Coordinator, Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ):
“The college itself is also benefiting, you know. Teachers here receive additional training in their respective subject matter, welding, woodwork and so on. We will support the college in establishing an entrepreneurship centre which can give support to upcoming start-ups of course from the inclusive classes for refugees and Ethiopians.”

Education and access to safe, decent work are topics under discussion at the Global Refugee Forum a high-level meeting to be held in Geneva later this year. States, the private sector and other actors will announce high-impact contributions that will give refugees a chance to use and further develop their skills and contribute to economic growth in their host communities.

For Hanan, Ethiopia has offered her opportunities that she would never have dreamt of back home. Her bond with Yanchinew grows stronger by the day.

SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Hanan Seif Hassan, Yemeni refugee:
“She is a really close friend and I love her so much. She is very sweet and decent.”

SOUNDBITE (Amharic) Yanchinew Gebeyahu, Ethiopian student:
“Learning together has exposed me to different cultures and languages and I have learned something. I now know how they live back home.”
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unifeed191029e
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2486941