UN / SOUTH EAST ASIA REFUGEES

Preview Language:   Original
01-Oct-2019 00:01:12
Refugee movements in South East Asia dropped sharply over the 18 months between January 2018 and June 2019, but the threats for those fleeing violence and persecution are higher, according to a report released on Monday by the UN Refugee Agency (UNHCR) in Bangkok. UNIFEED

Available Language: English
Type
Language
Format
Acquire
/
English
Other Formats
Description
STORY: UN / SOUTH EAST ASIA REFUGEES
TRT: 1:12
SOURCE: UNIFEED
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 01 OCTOBER 2019, NEW YORK CITY / FILE

SHOTLIST:

FILE – RECENT – NEW YORK CITY

1.Wide shot, exterior, United Nations

01 OCTOBER 2019, NEW YORK CITY

2.Wide shot, press briefing room
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Stéphane Dujarric, Spokesperson for the Secretary-General:
“The UN Refugee agency said today that while movements of refugees in South East Asia have dropped in the 18 months between January 2018 and June 2019, the threats for those fleeing violence and persecution are higher. The Rohingyas remained the largest refugee group on the move in this region. When nearly 18,000 were registered as new arrivals in Bangladesh during this period. Nearly 1,600 refugees and asylum-seekers embarked on dangerous maritime journeys in the Bay of Bengal and Andaman Sea and at least 15 of these people drowned, but that is obviously a conservative figure.”
4. Med shot, reporters
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Stéphane Dujarric, Spokesperson for the Secretary-General:
“UNHCR is calling on all countries in this region and beyond to expand opportunities for solutions through safe and legal pathways that can help reduce the likelihood that refugees will risk desperate and dangerous journeys or be forced into the hands of criminal smuggling networks and find protection or reunite with their families.”
6. Wide shot, press briefing room

STORYLINE:

Refugee movements in South East Asia dropped sharply over the 18 months between January 2018 and June 2019, but the threats for those fleeing violence and persecution are higher, according to a report released on Monday by the UN Refugee Agency (UNHCR) in Bangkok.

Speaking to reporters in New York today (01 Oct), UN spokesperson Stéphane Dujarric said, “the Rohingyas remained the largest refugee group on the move in this region. When nearly 18,000 were registered as new arrivals in Bangladesh during this period.”

Dujarric continued, “nearly 1,600 refugees and asylum-seekers embarked on dangerous maritime journeys in the Bay of Bengal and Andaman Sea and at least 15 of these people drowned, but that is obviously a conservative figure.”

The UN Spokesperson also said, “UNHCR is calling on all countries in this region and beyond to expand opportunities for solutions through safe and legal pathways that can help reduce the likelihood that refugees will risk desperate and dangerous journeys or be forced into the hands of criminal smuggling networks and find protection or reunite with their families.”

According to UN refugee agency, in previous years, smugglers were to blame for the majority of deaths. People were beaten to death or shot or deprived of food and water. Since early 2018 the primary cause of death or disappearance at sea has been a result of shipwrecks or boats in distress getting lost at sea. Many of these boats set sail without experienced crews and were not built, equipped or maintained for long journeys at sea.

Refugees’ testimonies gathered by UNHCR in 2019 also highlight the physical abuse by smugglers, often inflicted to extort ransoms from relatives or to enforce order and prevent demands for water and food during the irregular journey. Women and girls, especially those travelling on their own, were particularly at risk of rape and abuse. Of the refugees who had fled by land or sea more than 20 years ago, more than half said their journey was difficult but not life-threatening, but all those who had fled over last five years said they feared for their lives and described their journeys as hazardous or dangerous/very dangerous.

Meanwhile, across the rest of the region, small numbers of refugees have engaged in secondary movements from their initial country of asylum to another country. Physical threats, inability to meet basic needs, fears of deportation, tensions with the host community or lack of education opportunities were most commonly identified by refugees as triggers for their secondary displacement.
Series
Category
Topical Subjects
Geographic Subjects
Creator
UNIFEED
Alternate Title
unifeed191001b
Asset ID
2461298