ETHIOPIA / SOMALI REFUGEES

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20-Sep-2019 00:03:00
Worsening drought and insecurity caused by Al Shabab have forced more than 5,000 Somalis to seek refuge in Ethiopia so far this year – about four times the total number that crossed the border in 2018. UNHCR

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STORY: ETHIOPIA / SOMALI REFUGEES
TRT:3:00
SOURCE: UNHCR
RESTRICTIONS: PLEASE CREDIT UNHCR ON SCREEN
LANGUAGE: SOMALI /ENGLISH /NATS

DATELINE: 5 SEPTEMBER 2019, DOLLO ADO REFUGEE CAMP, ETHIOPIA

SHOTLIST:

1. Wide shot, people walking through dry area
2. Wide shot, Barwako walking with a pot in hand
3. Various shots, Barwako in a shelter with her children
4. SOUNDBITE (Somali) Barwako Abdi, Somali Refugee:
“I left because of my children. I want my children to succeed and have a bright future. Living on the farm when there is drought is always difficult. I have raised my children in hardship. I can’t let them be taken away by the fighters.”
5. Various shots, new arrivals at reception center
6. Wide shot, women and children walking at reception center
7. SOUNDBITE (English) Muhammad Harfoush, Protection Officer, UNHCR:
“New arrivals never stopped coming to Ethiopia, so every year we have some more coming and reporting the same challenges when it comes to drought, insecurity, shortage of food and water.
8. Med shot, woman drinking from a cup
9. Med shot, child with mother
10. SOUNDBITE (English) Muhammad Harfoush, Protection Officer, UNHCR:
“Daily arrivals are accommodated at the reception center, then transferred to the camp depending on the availability of shelters so that is a key challenge we have, we are trying to address it.”
11. Wide shot, beds at reception center
12. Med shot, new arrivals at reception center
13. Med shot, woman and child walking through dry landscape
14. Wide shot, man walking behind donkey car in dry landscape
15. Wide shot, children at reception center
16. SOUNDBITE (Somali) Shalle Hassan Abdirahman, Somali Refugee:
“There was a time when we would cultivate the farms. The river would rise, and it would flow, and we survived. We planted maize, tomatoes, sesame and other things along the river. Now the river is dry and there is no more rain. What’s worse is that Al Shabab forced us to give them the little we had.”
17. Various shots, nearly dry riverbed with donkeys in background
18. Various shots, Shale walking through reception center
Shale and his family at reception center
19. SOUNDBITE (Somali) Shalle Hassan Abdirahman, Somali Refugee:
“Everyone is affected. They will not stay. Drought is in the land and people are afraid that with Al Shabab they will be killed.”
20. Med shot, child at reception center

STORYLINE:

Barwako Noor Abdi knew her family could not endure another drought, so she sold the little land they had left in Somalia and fled to Ethiopia.

SOUNDBITE (Somali) Barwako Abdi, Somali Refugee:
“I left because of my children. I want my children to succeed and have a bright future. Living on the farm when there is drought is always difficult. I have raised my children in hardship. I can’t let them be taken away by the fighters.”

Ethiopia has received 5000 Somali refugees so far this year - almost four times more than in 2018. They arrive every day.

SOUNDBITE (English) Muhammad Harfoush, Protection Officer, UNHCR:
“New arrivals never stopped coming to Ethiopia, so every year we have some more coming and reporting the same challenges when it comes to drought, insecurity, shortage of food and water.

Climate change is fueling a cycle of vulnerability for pastoralists and farmers like Barwako while insecurity continues to threaten daily life.

SOUNDBITE (English) Muhammad Harfoush, Protection Officer, UNHCR:
“Daily arrivals are accommodated at the reception center, then transferred to the camp depending on the availability of shelters so that is a key challenge we have, we are trying to address it.”

Many people arriving at UNHCR’s reception centre in Dollo Ado, 3 kilometers from the border with Somalia, say the drought is making it harder to pay the “tax” that Al Shabab regularly extort from those living in areas under their control.

SOUNDBITE (Somali) Shalle Hassan Abdirahman, Somali Refugee:
“There was a time when we would cultivate the farms. The river would rise, and it would flow, and we survived. We planted maize, tomatoes, sesame and other things along the river. Now the river is dry and there is no more rain. What’s worse is that Al Shabab forced us to give them the little we had.”

In Ethiopia, Shale found safety. Back in Somalia, about two million people face starvation and constant threat from armed groups.

SOUNDBITE (Somali) Shalle Hassan Abdirahman, Somali Refugee:
“Everyone is affected. They will not stay. Drought is in the land and people are afraid that with Al Shabab they will be killed.”

In 2011, drought in the Horn of Africa region caused a food crisis that affected more than 10 million people. This year, more than 2 million Somalis are at risk of severe hunger.
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UNHCR
Alternate Title
unifeed190920f
Asset ID
2451853